Home
Search results “Academic publishing articles”
13 Tips for Writing a Great Journal Article
 
05:01
13 TIPS FOR WRITING A GREAT JOURNAL ARTICLE: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting gives tips on writing a journal article. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I have 13 tips for writing a great academic article or paper. First, let us start before any writing has occurred. Think about whether the effort is justified. Is the topic new and novel in the field? Is the article about a particularly timely topic in your area? Don’t just write an article because you can; rather look to make a difference. Second, think about where you want to submit the manuscript. Be a loyal reader of any journal you intend to submit to; do not just pick one out of an online search. Know the mission of the publication. This will allow you to focus your writing on that journal. Third, follow the instruction or guidelines for authors for that journal very closely, particularly in regard to length and format. Now, let us look at mechanics. The fourth tip is to follow closely the appropriate style manual. Whether the AMA, APA, Chicago style guides, or others, you will benefit by understanding these guidelines in your field. Fifth, short and concise is always better. This applies to the entire manuscript but also to sentence length and paragraph length as well. No one ever said, “I wish that paper was longer.” Ruthlessly delete all extraneous materials. Sixth, follow accepted practices in regard to grammar and style. If you do not know the expected practices find someone that does. Also, read the articles in the journals you are submitting to so you can understand the tone of these articles. Now, let us look at the content presentation. Seventh, when the paper is written, review the abstract very, very closely. Many people will read only the abstract and it needs to be flawless. Make sure it conforms to the abstract format in your intended publication. Eight, consider the article title very carefully. Avoid a boring title which is really just a label. Consider something thought provoking or maybe even provocative, but do not stray so far that it is corny or sensational. Ninth, make sure any tables, charts, images, or graphics are essential and created in a quality fashion. Does each item standalone by itself? Lastly, let us consider the review of the manuscript before submission. My tenth tip is to read the final manuscript aloud several times. This helps for clarity and language. Eleventh, aside from having the content reviewed by your peers before submission, have others outside your field read the paper as well. Listen closely to any suggestions they have. Twelfth, avoid any hint of plagiarism. Always cite your sources. Never take any passage or ideas from others. An error here can affect your career or reputation. Finally, I know many people that watch these videos are non-English language speakers that may be submitting to an English language journal. If so, I suggest having a native English language colleague or speaker read and help craft the paper before submission. This will likely increase the quality of the final product and therefore increase the likelihood of acceptance. If you do not know anyone to help with this, there are many editorial services that will now assist for a fee. Or email me for suggestions of editors that can help with this. At the end of the day, there is no secret to success. Attention to detail and a careful review of the language will hopefully improve your work.
Views: 11261 John Bond
What is Academic Publishing?
 
04:25
WHAT IS ACADEMIC PUBLISHING?: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting defines academic publishing. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com MORE VIDEOS on what Academic Publishing is can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3icGmNLx9Wk6eUyeeTRR0uM JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process” To find out more about the book: https://www.riverwindsconsulting.com/rfps Buy it at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Request-Proposal-Publishing-Managing-Process-ebook/dp/B071W7MBLM/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1497619963&sr=1-1&keywords=john+bond+rfps SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPTHi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to give a broad overview of what is scholarly or academic publishing. To start with publishing is the broad term for the dissemination of knowledge. Traditional publishing can take many forms: books, monographs, or textbooks; journals or magazines; newspapers. All of these may now be in paper or electronic form or both. Now education or information can be in many other forms: videos, podcasts, learning modules, webinars, and many, many more. This knowledge can be distributed for free or at a cost, such as purchasing a product or via a subscription. The traditional steps of publishing are: product or content acquisitions, copy editing, production or page make up, printing or posting in the appropriate electronic form, and then marketing and distribution. Academic or scholarly publishing is an important part of publishing. The goal of scholarly publishing is to disseminate academic research and scholarship. The traditional ways have been through journals and books, but increasing other avenues exist as well. A few points distinguish scholarly publishing from general or trade publishing. First is peer review whereby experts in the field review the content to ensure accuracy and to determine the material advances the field of study. This helps a journal or the like be selective and that it ensures that quality content is published. Scholarly publishing many times is very specialized. An important trend in scholarly publishing is open access, whereby the content is free to almost anyone with internet access. The author or a funder pays for the publication of the material and there usually are few restrictions on its use or reuse. An incredible amount of content is created each year in academic publishing. There are perhaps 35,000 peer review journals in the world today that publish between two and two and half million peer reviewed articles each year. What qualifies as a publisher is now broader than ever before. Traditionally for-profit publishers, associations or societies, university presses and some others covered the constellation of groups that published content. Now open access organizations like PLOS or BioMed Central, content aggregators, websites, video channels like YouTube, social media sites, and many, many others count themselves rightly as publishers. In scholarly publishing, there may be between 2,000 to 3,000 or organizations publishing or creating content today, depending on how they are counted. How publishers describe themselves reflects the changing times. Elsevier, a large publisher, tags itself as “An Information Analytics Company, Empowering Knowledge.” Another publisher, Wolters Kluwer, says it “provides information, software, and services.” And Wiley says it is a global provider of “content-enabled solutions to improve outcomes in research, education and professional practice.” Note none of these say publish, books, or journals in their description. And things will only continue to evolve and change even more. Thank heavens.
Views: 1579 John Bond
What to think about before you start to write a journal article
 
03:49
Discover the four A’s with editor Professor David Simon, as he offers advice on what to think about before you start to write an article. About us: Taylor & Francis Group partners with world-class authors, from leading scientists and researchers, to scholars and professionals operating at the top of their fields. Together, we publish in all areas of the Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, Technology and Medicine sectors. We are one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, eBooks, text books and reference works. For more author insights follow us at: https://www.facebook.com/tandfauthorservices https://twitter.com/tandfauthorserv https://www.linkedin.com/company/taylor-&-francis-group To browse our 2600+ journals visit: http://www.tandfonline.com And learn more about Informa at: https://informa.com/
Views: 70429 Taylor & Francis
How Open-Access Journals Are Transforming Science
 
19:00
Academic publishers are locking up the latest research behind paywalls and hurting science, says Michael Eisen. We spoke with the co-founder of the Public Library of Science about democratizing scientific progress. Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://youtube.com/reasontv Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Reason.Magazine/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/reason Subscribe to our podcast at iTunes: https://goo.gl/az3a7a Reason is the planet's leading source of news, politics, and culture from a libertarian perspective. Go to reason.com for a point of view you won't get from legacy media and old left-right opinion magazines. ---------------- Michael Eisen's goal is to change the way scientific findings are disseminated. Most research papers today are locked behind paywalls, and access can cost hundreds of dollars per article. The general public, and most scientists, don't have comprehensive access to the most up-to-date research, even though much of it is funded by U.S. taxpayers. "It's a completely ridiculous system," says Eisen, an acclaimed biologist at UC Berkeley, an independent candidate for Senate in California running against Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D), and a co-founder of the Public Library of Science, or PLOS, which publishes some of the largest and most prestigious academic journals in the world. These publications stand out for another reason: They're open access, meaning that anyone with an internet connection can read them for free. PLOS seeks to break up the academic publishing cartel, and it's a leading force in the so-called open science movement, which aims to give the public access to cutting-edge research and democratize scientific progress. This movement became widely publicized after famed hacker and Reddit co-founder Aaron Swartz sought to upend the publishing system by uploading millions of articles for free; he was prosecuted relentlessly, and ultimately committed suicide in 2013. Eisen first thought he could simply convince his fellow scientists to start uploading their work, but that didn't work because universities and funding agencies use journals as a proxy for quality. They base tenure and award decisions in large part on how many articles a researcher publishes, and on the reputations of the publishers. To encourage a switch in researchers' thinking, PLOS's first journal, PLOS Biology, attempted to emulate what Eisen describes as the "snooty" journals such as Science and Nature, which generate prestige in part by rejecting most submitted papers. PLOS Biology became well regarded and provided a proof of concept for PLOS's model, in which funding agencies or universities pay a flat fee up front (typically $1,500, but adjusted based on ability to pay) that's then made accessible for free. The multidisciplinary journal PLOS ONE, created in 2006, used this same model to become the largest academic publication in the world, though it's been surpassed by other open access sources. PLOS ONE puts papers through a fairly typical peer review process, but it doesn't ask editors to determine a paper's importance; the journal will publish any study that follows sound science and reports its data. According to Eisen, this model encourages more thorough experiments, rather than flashy results that aren't reproducible, and allows readers to determine whether a particular study is important and valid. Reason spoke with Eisen at the BioHack the Planet Conference in Oakland, a gathering for DIY scientists known as biohackers who eschew traditional research institutions. They often carry out experiments in garage labs and share their raw findings on the internet in real time, a publishing model to which Eisen believes all scientists should aspire. Eisen also discussed why scientists and universities continue to prop up the academic publishing monopoly, how scientific progress suffers from the current regime, why he's running for senate as an independent, why he beleives political parties are obsolete, and the way forward for the open science movement. Produced by Justin Monticello. Cameras by Alexis Garcia and Monticello. Music by Silent Partner (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ha94-6CQdo0), Vibe Tracks (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3-fPJLhcato), and MK2 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2GRv3HYpoU).
Views: 13650 ReasonTV
How to get a paper published in a high impact journal?
 
49:53
Clare Llewellyn (UK)
Views: 25585 EASO Obesity
Publishing in Academic Journals (complete series)
 
32:07
This video covers a number of important issues relating to publishing in academic journals. It is a combination of all 4 parts of a series. It functions as a stand-alone informative video for researchers and research students, as well as a pre-workshop preparation resource for people coming to a workshop with me. The 4 parts can be watched separately and are: Part 1: What is changing (and not changing) in academic journal publishing Part 2: Copyright and Open Access issues Part 3: Journal quality and status indicators Part 4: Peer review
Views: 849 Nick Hopwood
Academic Workshop Publishing A Journal Article
 
03:08:26
LPDP MONASH UNI WORKSHOP
Views: 313 Alinda Chrisly
How to Publish a Journal Article - Part One
 
12:12
Dr Lucinda Becker at the University of Reading provides a practical two-part video presentation on how to get your journal article published
Views: 23483 SAGE
Publishing in academic journals tips to have a perfect start
 
01:24:25
Lyndsey Dixon, journals editorial director for Asia Pacific, Taylor & Francis talks the essential skills on planning and submitting articles to academic journals. It is designed not to teach how to write a paper, but instead to offer advices on choosing the correct journal and understanding journals publishing process and practice. This seminar will cover: Publishing ethics; Choose the right journal; Understand the standard and practice; Peer-review and publishing processes; Unique and persistent researcher identifiers (ORCID iD) Date: November 07, 2017 (Tuesday) Time: 12:30 - 14:00
Views: 172 HKUST Library
How to Write and Publish a Scientific Paper
 
06:14
Publishing papers is how new discoveries are shared across the scientific community. Here at IRIS, we think that student researchers have just as much cause to be writing up their research as any other researcher. To demystify the process, we've made a couple of videos in collaboration with Institute of Physics Publishing, explaining the paper writing process. In this video we look at what actually goes into a paper; what to write, what order to write it in, how to write it, and what to do with your finished paper. Music by Lee Rosevere Video by Poppy Illsley
The Future of Academic Publishing
 
19:18
Dialogic Chat w/ Associate Professor Peggy Semingson from the University of Texas at Arlington and Professor Evan Ortlieb from St. John's University.
Views: 112 Evan Ortlieb
How to Submit an Article
 
03:52
How to Submit an Article. This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses the procedure for submitting a paper to a peer review journal. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk how to submit an article to a scholarly journal for possible publication. So, you have done the research. You have compiled your data and drawn your conclusions. Your manuscript or paper is written. You have had colleagues and friends give you feedback and you have made appropriate changes. You have had it proofread by a friend. Now it is game time. You want to submit the manuscript for publication in a peer review journal. But how do you proceed? First, draft a list of possible journals for consideration. Hopefully, you know and read these journals religiously. This will help to decide which journal to try first, based on its niche. Next, go to your top targeted journal and read their Guidelines for Authors or Information for Authors. Study it and ensure you are in 100% compliance, such as with their requested page count, reference style, types of manuscripts they seek. Third, consider whether you should query the editor of the journal about their interest in the submission. Some journals encourage this, some allow it, and some don’t address queries without the manuscript. Now you are ready. Most journals will use a manuscript submission tracking system. Popular ones are Editorial Manager by Aries Systems, ScholarOne by Clarivate Analytics, and others. When you find get to journal’s page for submission, your first step will likely be registration. You will create an account that you will potentially use to check back in on its progress. Next you will need to enter into the system information about your manuscript. This will include title, authors including contact information and degrees, keywords, and more. Likely, you and the co-authors will need to sign a conflict of interest statement as well as potential financial disclosures. Next you will upload the manuscript. The text part of the manuscript will be separate, as might the abstract. After that, you will upload the various components such as tables, figures, videos, or more. Most journals have exacting requirements as to the format and size of the files. The journal might then display a PDF or complied version of the paper for you to approve. The final step is, although for some journals it might be earlier in the process, is signing a copyright statement or form. All authors of the paper will need to read and sign it, likely electronically. You may need to acknowledge any fees such as an APC or author processing charge for an open access journal, but they are usually not due at this stage. You may also be asked for colleagues in your area of specialty to submit your article to for peer review, but they are likely to have their own list as well. From there, the journal and peer review process take over. Each journal has a slightly different procedure, but they all roughly follow these steps. Good luck with publication. Well that’s it. I am a publishing consultant and work with associations, publishers, and individuals on a host of content related challenges. Reach out to me at RiverwindsConsulting.com with your questions. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click here to see my video on choosing the best journal for your paper. And make comments below. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 448 John Bond
Leadership Lab: Publishing in Academic Journals
 
01:14:11
Publishing in academic journals can present unfamiliar challenges without clear-cut solutions. What should you publish, and when? How to find the right journal for your submission? How to respond to feedback from anonymous readers? In this workshop, a panel of faculty members and journal editors will shed light on the publishing process, and answer any questions you may have. Panelists: -Susan Allen, Managing Editor, American Journal of Sociology -John Brehm, Professor of Political Science, author of numerous single-author and joint-author articles -Jan Goldstein, Norman and Edna Freehling Professor of History, the Conceptual and Historical Studies of Science, and the College, editor of the Journal of Modern History -Linda Smith, Assistant Director of the University of Chicago Writing Program
How to Write a Paper in a Weekend (By Prof. Pete Carr)
 
11:39
In this video, Prof. Carr (faculty member at the University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry) is explaining the Algorithm of writing a paper in a weekend.
How to Publish Like an Academic Rock Star
 
47:13
Do you have a doctoral thesis or manuscript you would like to publish? Join GEG for a talk by Dominic Byatt, Lead Publisher for Academic Social Sciences and Humanities at Oxford University Press. His talk will provide an insider’s guide to the publishing process, suggesting the best combination of strategy and tactics for placing book projects with the most appropriate publisher, and offering a host of practical tips and advice along the way. He will offer an insight into the current state of scholarly publishing in the social sciences and humanities, the many and varied challenges being faced by publishers, and likely future developments across the sector. Dominic was educated at University College, London, the University of Exeter, and Nuffield College, Oxford he has been publishing books at OUP since 1993. In addition to commissioning one of the world’s leading lists in political science he oversees a great deal of the Press’s academic publishing in Economics & Finance, Business & Management, Religion & Bibles, and Classics & Archaeology. He recently chaired the Political Studies Association’s ‘Reaching Out’ Commission. Chair: GEG Director Emily Jones
Writing a journal paper
 
43:24
The presentation explores the content of a journal paper regarding its form, structure and content. Presentation related documents can be found under this link: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/0ps4io3q0w5n0up/AADWrNNY2pe0sjWiqqV_qhK-a?dl=0
Views: 18347 Shady Attia
Publishing Your First Research Paper
 
06:28
My brother, who is in the third (penultimate) year of his PhD, briefly shares his experience of publishing his first ever research paper in a scientific journal. Are you a researcher? Have you published or are thinking of publishing a paper? If so, please do leave me a comment below. Hope this video helped and thanks for watching! :)
Views: 27172 MyTake
All Scientific Papers Should Be Free; Here's Why They're Not
 
04:43
Have you ever tried to access scientific research but the website says you have to pay? Why is that? Shouldn't information be free? Who Pays For Science? - https://youtu.be/L7oklmbtxoY Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here - http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Read More: Who Pick Up the Tab for Science? http://www.bu.edu/research/articles/funding-for-scientific-research/ "Scientists say that much of the public-and many politicians-do not have a general understanding of the scientific process, knowledge critical for smart decision-making in our increasingly technological society." Peer Review at Science Publications http://www.sciencemag.org/authors/peer-review-science-publications "For in-depth review, at least two outside referees are consulted. Reviewers are contacted before being sent a paper and are asked to return comments within 1 to 2 weeks for most papers. Reviewers may be selected to evaluate separate components of a manuscript." Vestiges of print publications in scientific journals https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/information-culture/vestiges-of-print-publication-in-scientific-journals/ "The first scientific journals were published in the late 17th century, and these print publications changed very little over time. Developments in printing technology, distribution and the advent of the commercial publisher all impacted the process, but the basic form was easily recognizable." ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos daily. Watch More DNews on Seeker http://www.seeker.com/show/dnews/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/+dnews Seeker http://www.seeker.com/ Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here: http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Written By: Trace Dominguez
Views: 153868 Seeker
What is ACADEMIC PUBLISHING? What does ACADEMIC PUBLISHING mean?
 
02:36
What is ACADEMIC PUBLISHING? What does ACADEMIC PUBLISHING mean? Academic publishing is the subfield of publishing which distributes academic research and scholarship. Most academic work is published in academic journal article, book or thesis form. The part of academic written output that is not formally published but merely printed up or posted on the Internet is often called "grey literature". Most scientific and scholarly journals, and many academic and scholarly books, though not all, are based on some form of peer review or editorial refereeing to qualify texts for publication. Peer review quality and selectivity standards vary greatly from journal to journal, publisher to publisher, and field to field. Most established academic disciplines have their own journals and other outlets for publication, although many academic journals are somewhat interdisciplinary, and publish work from several distinct fields or subfields. There is also a tendency for existing journals to divide into specialized sections as the field itself becomes more specialized. Along with the variation in review and publication procedures, the kinds of publications that are accepted as contributions to knowledge or research differ greatly among fields and subfields. Academic publishing is undergoing major changes, as it makes the transition from the print to the electronic format. Business models are different in the electronic environment. Since the early 1990s, licensing of electronic resources, particularly journals, has been very common. Currently, an important trend, particularly with respect to journals in the sciences, is open access via the Internet. In open access publishing a journal article is made available free for all on the web by the publisher at the time of publication. It is typically made possible after the author pays hundreds or thousands of dollars in publication fees, thereby shifting the costs from the reader to the researcher or their funder. The Internet has facilitated open access self-archiving, in which authors themselves make a copy of their published articles available free for all on the web.
Views: 138 The Audiopedia
How to write a scientific paper
 
08:34
Do you want to write and publish an academic or scientific paper? To get a paper published in a peer-reviewed journal is not difficult. This video will provide you with insights into what to include in each section of the paper and talk you through some of the best practices for writing. This video deals mostly with how to write up the results of quantitative research. The principles, however, apply to qualitative research too (with slightly different content in the methods section). You’ve done a study, you’ve collected and analysed the data. Now it’s time to write it up and get it published. This video was sponsored by BMC - https://www.biomedcentral.com This channel posts global health and public health teaching videos and videos about how to find the right job in global health. If you haven't already, please consider subscribing to this channel and becoming part of this community. SUBSCRIBE: -------------------- Click here: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=YourChannelNameHere LETS CONNECT: --------------------------- Twitter: @drgregmartin Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/drgregmartin/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thisweekinglobalhealth/ SUPPORT THIS CHANNEL ----------------------------------------- Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/drgregmartin
2018 Trends in Scholarly Publishing
 
03:05
TRENDS IN SCHOLARLY PUBLISHING FOR 2018: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting some of the trends in publishing in 2018. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPTS Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about the trends in scholarly publishing for 2018. The academic publishing world continues to be buffeted by change. Whether this is positive or negative is in the eye of the beholder. Here is a random list of the key topics presenting opportunities and threats to the world of publishing. First, open access will evolve further. The players will continue to change as the commercialization of OA affects how it is perceived. Services connected to open access will expand. Key players may merge, be bought, or change their model. Second, preprints will continue to change the landscape of publishing. The more preprints are accepted in scholarly publishing and in academia, the more the subscription and OA models will be changed in regard to their perceived value. Third, will be an ongoing concern about the economy and its effect on scholarly publishing. Whether it is a market correction in 2018, change in government funding in the US and the trickle-down affect (or assault) on library budgets, or continue Mergers and Acquisitions activity; business and financial issues will stay on the front of people’s minds. Fourth, voice search will make inroads into scholarly publishing specifically with intelligent personal assistants like Siri, Alexa, and a growing list. Publishers will need to be vigilant in their preparation of their content and SEO procedures for the future in the world of voice search. Fifth, Sci-Hub will remain in the news and cause disruption. Woe to those publishers that are not thinking through authentication as well as how to deal with these types of services. Sixth, delivering content in video and audio form will grow with customer demand. Many publishers are using innovative ways to deliver journal abstracts, news articles, continuing education to mobile customers and readers as the usage numbers are skyrocketing. Seventh, machine learning will increase in the impact on scholarly content. Publishers will find opportunities with machine learning and artificial intelligence to partner with research institutions and others to create innovative non-book or journal products. And there many more I could discuss. How will the net-neutrality fight affect publishers? Also, topics such as workflows, accessibility for content, increased services provided by publishers will all present opportunities for publishing. How will it all turn out? Stay tuned over the next 12 months. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist to see more of my videos. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 876 John Bond
Professor John Antonakis discusses the five diseases of academic publishing
 
03:55
To learn more about the five diseases of academic publishing refer to the following article: Antonakis, J. (2017). On doing better science: From thrill of discovery to policy implications. The Leadership Quarterly, 28(1), 5-21. It is available on the Elsevier website: https://www.elsevier.com/connect/5-diseases-ailing-research-and-how-to-cure-them You may also contact Prof. John Antonakis directly at [email protected]
Views: 484 HECLausanneofficial
How to select academic journals for publishing?
 
01:36
How to Select a Journal for you Research Paper? #Check if your selected journals are listed in: Thomson Reuters http://ip-science.thomsonreuters.com/mjl/ Norwegian Scientific Database https://dbh.nsd.uib.no/publiseringskanaler/Forside Publish or Perish http://www.harzing.com/resources/journal-quality-list #Research #Paper #Publication #Journal #Selection #Academic #Publishing #Elsevier #ResearchHUB
Views: 4096 Research HUB
Publishing a Scholarly Article
 
04:03
Produced by the University Library at the University of Michigan, 2010.
Views: 361 umichugli
Using Video in Academic Publishing
 
04:20
USING VIDEO IN PUBLISHING: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses the uses of video in scholarly publishing. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process” To find out more about the book: https://www.riverwindsconsulting.com/rfps/ Buy it at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Request-Proposal-Publishing-Managing-Process-ebook/dp/B071W7MBLM/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1497619963&sr=1-1&keywords=john+bond+rfps/ SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about the many ways publishers can use video. Consumption of video has grown by leaps and bounds in recent years and publishing has taken notice. Academic publishers are increasingly using video to create or augment content as well as in their marketing efforts and for customer support. Here are a few ideas on how to add video to your organization’s offerings. From a content perspective, there are several avenues. In a previous video, I’ve discussed creating video abstracts for journal articles. These video abstracts can dramatically increase article downloads or views by engaging readers or subscribers. Also, supplemental content to books or journals can be video based, including instructor’s materials to textbooks. Organizations with news components might have news articles read aloud and captured on video. These videos can add new ways for visually oriented customers to consume news. From a marketing or sales perspective, there are some great uses of video. First are author or editor interviews about a product. Create a crisp and clean 5-minute video of the author of a new monograph. The author can discuss how the book came about, what its focus is, or its features and benefits. Let their passion come across. Or make short commercials about the publication, maybe one-minute long. Show shots of the cover, inside visual pages, supporting material, author bios, etc. with narration overlaid. Or create guides to using a product or publication. These can be lengthier, depending on complexity. They can cover tech support questions that have been received; or demonstrate how to use and navigate around a publication or product. Film events such as book releases or author signings. They help to humanize the authors or editors. Finally, be creative and take risks. Maybe sponsor a film competition based around a major product you are releasing. Or invite students to submit work. Try new things and post the results online....
Views: 68 John Bond
Journal Paper Submission Process
 
36:42
This presentation is for early carrier researchers who are preparing to submit a journal paper. The presentation describes the required steps that needs to be addressed before submission and after submission. The presentation also elaborate on procedures that take place after acceptance as well as rejection. Finally, the presentation shares some common comments of reviewers and presents a checklist to use before submitting a paper.
Views: 20121 Shady Attia
How to Get Published in a Peer-Review Journal: Presentation
 
26:40
Bob Löwenberg, MD, PhD Blood Editor-in-Chief Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherland
How Do I Choose the Best Journal for My Paper?
 
05:01
HOW DO I CHOOSE THE BEST JOURNAL FOR MY PAPER? Which journal is the best one in scholarly publishing for my paper? This video lists the decision points when making this decision. MORE VIDEOS on Choosing Which Journal to Publish Your Article https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3jkGjy26P2tVNragL2ik0c2 FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: How do I decide the best journal for my paper? Hi there, I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am to going to be discussing how to choose a scholarly journal for you to submit your paper to. A bit about me: I’ve been in scholarly publishing for over 25 year and as Chief Content Officer for a major medical publisher oversaw the publishing of over 20,000 peer reviewed articles. So, you have collected your data and information or completed your study. You have written your paper. Now what? Prior to deciding, make sure you have had the paper read and critiqued by your colleagues and associates. Consider very carefully their feedback and make the changes where you see fit. Remember to give it one more very close check for grammar, spelling, format and style before moving on. Now you are ready. In starting to consider where to submit your paper, create a chart or list of the options under consideration. Include the journals you read and receive; and the ones you respect. Ask your co-workers and colleagues what journals best fit the topic of your paper and have them weigh in on their opinions on the publications. In your chart, list these journal names and their urls. Most journal website will have an About section that will list the Mission or Aims and Scope of the publication. Read them and see if they align with your content and article format. Add to the chart the journal’s frequency; that is monthly, bimonthly, quarterly. Closely review the Information for Authors published for each Journal, likely at their website. This is the best guide to see if your article is a fit and will save everyone time. Read it very closely. Not just their mission but also the specifications for format and types of articles that are interested in. Also, if a journal has an Impact Factor, it may be listed at their website. If not, sometimes searching the web for that journal’s current Impact Factor will give you an answer. List whether the journal is subscription based, or sent to members of a Society, or an Open Access publication. Sometimes a journal may be more than one of these. If it is Open Access, check out the APC or Author Processing Charge and include the amount, if any. The more widely the journal is available, for example an Open Access publication, the more your article will get downloaded and read. Next check on where the journal is indexed. For instance, in medicine or nursing, being included in Medline or CINAHL are essential. Check for your area of specialty to see if the journal is covered in your key abstracting and indexing service. Once again, go the website and ensure articles are included online in addition to in the paper version of the journal. Are they posted online at acceptance or only when a print version appears? What may be listed at a website is the average time a paper takes to get from submission to decision and then the time it takes to get from acceptance to being published. If your topic has a sense of urgency to it, this time can be a critical decision. These times may not be publicly available. On occasion, the acceptance rate or rejection rate from the previous year may be listed. This would be a key piece of data as well. Search your topic over at a journal’s website to see if they have published any articles on it over the past two years. Most journals are looking for new or novel takes on existing topics and you might want to see what they have recently published. Finally, submit to just one journal at a time. I know it is tempting to reduce the wait time and send out to many journals or publications, but etiquette (and ethics) demand one at a time only.....
Views: 15767 John Bond
How to Read a Research Paper
 
08:44
Ever wondered how I consume research so fast? I'm going to describe the process i use to read lots of machine learning research papers fast and efficiently. It's basically a 3-pass approach, i'll go over the details and show you the extra resources I use to learn these advanced topics. You don't have to be a PhD, anyone can read research papers. It just takes practice and patience. Please Subscribe! And like. And comment. That's what keeps me going. Want more education? Connect with me here: Twitter: https://twitter.com/sirajraval Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sirajology instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sirajraval More learning resources: http://www.arxiv-sanity.com/ https://www.reddit.com/r/MachineLearning/ https://www.elsevier.com/connect/infographic-how-to-read-a-scientific-paper https://www.quora.com/How-do-I-start-reading-research-papers-on-Machine-Learning https://www.reddit.com/r/MachineLearning/comments/6rj9r4/d_how_do_you_read_mathheavy_machine_learning/ https://machinelearningmastery.com/how-to-research-a-machine-learning-algorithm/ http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2016/03/how-seriously-read-scientific-paper Join us in the Wizards Slack channel: http://wizards.herokuapp.com/ And please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3191693 Signup for my newsletter for exciting updates in the field of AI: https://goo.gl/FZzJ5w Hit the Join button above to sign up to become a member of my channel for access to exclusive content!
Views: 228117 Siraj Raval
Introduction to Scholarly Publishing # 02 -- The Journal Publishing Cycle
 
09:56
Learn about the 6 steps in the journal publishing cycle: Organize editorial boards, manage submissions and peer review, typeset and production of articles, publish and dissemination of articles, and archiving.
Views: 2112 Elsevier Journals
How to Write for Academic Journal?
 
01:15:34
ISET Policy Institute Dr. Randall Filer, Hunter College, the City University of New York - discusses Dos and Don'ts of writing for academic journals. This video is best for people who are looking for some tips in academic writing - especially those who are aiming their papers to high-end journals.
Views: 25307 ISETchannel
Publishing Academic Articles: Who, What, When, Where, How and Why?
 
45:30
This 45-minute talk explores the basics of academic journal publishing in history: the reasons why one publishes journal articles, deciding what to submit, selecting a journal, preparing a manuscript for submission; navigating peer review; and making the best use of criticism.
Views: 43 Paul Kramer
Publish Article at Journal of American Academic Research How to Publish Article in USA in America
 
00:17
Publish Article at Journal of American Academic Research How to Publish Article in USA in America Thanks and Best Regards, Journal of American Academic Research JAAR Publishing Center San Francisco, CA, USA ISSN: 2328-1227 Email: [email protected] Website: https://www.american-journals.com/about LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/journal-of-american-academic-research Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/publishinginus Twitter: https://twitter.com/USAjournalJAAR Google+:https://plus.google.com/u/1/108301661896171519792/posts #journals #publish #publish #publishing #journal #usa #publishingservices #academicpublishing #facebook #twitter #bookpublishing #linkedin #publisher #publishers #publishers #publications #publication #books #articles #researchers #awards #travel #science #research #drallisonqiu #DrAllisonQiu #highereducation #universities #award #academicresearch #education #bookpublishing #academicresearch #professors #associateprofessor #reviews #california #teaching #neuroscience #academia #scholarships #doctorate #academics #phdchat #phdlife #professor #lecturing #phdstudent #researcher #hightechnology #phdstudent #scholarship #highereducationresearch #lecturer #scientificresearch #scholars #america #phd #university #scholar #researchpaper #grapevine #academicjournal
Views: 1229 Dr. Allison Qiu
Predatory Publishing: From "Fake Academia" to Real Extortion in Scholarly Publishing
 
01:02:59
March 22, 2017 Brandon Butler Have you ever received an unsolicited email from a publisher you’ve never heard of inviting you to submit a paper to a journal with a generic-but-believable-sounding name or a conference abroad or at an airport hotel? These publishers may advertise their journals as “open access” and promise to make your work visible to well-known indices; they may claim “impact factors” and editorial board members who are leaders in their field. All that’s required of you is a modest fee—an "author’s processing charge"—and these publishers can deliver the lifeblood of any academic career: a peer-reviewed publication. There’s just one catch: the journals are fake. These journals are labeled "predatory," and they are sometimes associated with the broader open-access movement. This Medical Center Hour tours the strange world of predatory publishing and describes some of its more outrageous excesses. But, as Brandon Butler will argue, the fake journals are just a distraction. The academy today faces more serious challenges as it wrestles with how best to share research and knowledge. How should academia confront the predatory moves of its most well-established publishing partners and take better advantage of open access? A John F. Anderson Memorial Lecture
Joe Rogan Experience #1191 - Peter Boghossian & James Lindsay
 
01:58:37
Peter Boghossian is a philosophy instructor, activist, author, speaker, and atheism advocate. He is a full-time faculty member at Portland State University. James Lindsay has a Ph.D. in mathematics and a background in physics and is also the author of three books.
Views: 1351437 PowerfulJRE
Editing: Things they don't tell you about what journal editors want
 
21:02
Pippa Smart, independent publishing and research communications consultant and Editor-in-Chief of the journal, Learned Publishing, provides some insights into the ‘black box’ of editorial decision-making and how authors can improve their chances of article acceptance. Recorded 6 July 2016 at a MedComms Networking event in Oxford. Produced by NetworkPharma.tv = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = ABSTRACT: Many authors are mystified both by the time it takes to publish work, and by the reasons for its being rejected or accepted only subject to revisions. The process of publication is actually straightforward. Following initial checks for completeness, suitability and plagiarism, high-impact journals tend to reject 70% or more of papers immediately, i.e. within a week or so, while those with less strict criteria will reject at least 30% of submissions. The commonest reasons are that the work is out of scope of the journal, or the quality is insufficient for a variety of reasons, from lack of originality, to flawed science and poor quality writing or overall structure. The review process is generally very time-consuming. It is standard practice to have three reviewers per article; one or two may be suggested by the authors, though not necessarily accepted. Recruiting these reviewers may require eight or more invitations. An editor will normally allow two weeks for review; however, deadlines are frequently missed, and the reviews received may be contradictory or unhelpful, necessitating a further round of reviewer recruitment or sometimes arbitration by an additional reviewer. Acceptance without changes following review is rare; the most common decision by an editor is to request revisions, which may be minor or major. Authors can greatly improve their chances of acceptance by carefully reading journal author guidelines, checking journal scopes to ensure that they submit to a suitable journal, and submitting good quality work. A good article will be attractive to a journal editor, communicate its message clearly and concisely, and encourage citation. Written by Penny Gray, Freelance Medical Writer = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = We are building a library of free webcasts, like this one, for the global MedComms Community and others at http://www.networkpharma.tv and we’d welcome your suggestions for new topics and speakers. Full details of this MedComms Networking event are at http://medcommsnetworking.com/event75.html Pippa’s presentation (PDF format) is at http://medcommsnetworking.com/presentations/smart_02_060716.pdf Pippa’s Linkedin page is at https://www.linkedin.com/in/pippa-smart-2b6b2a2/ More about PSP Consulting can be found at http://www.pspconsulting.org Filming and technical direction by Mario Crispino, Freelance Cameraman & Editor [For the avoidance of doubt: this video is intended to be freely accessible to all. Please feel free to share and use however you like. Cheers Peter Llewellyn, Director NetworkPharma Ltd and Founder of the MedComms Networking Community activity at http://www.medcommsnetworking.com]
Views: 15776 MedComms
Should I Publish in an Open Access Journal?
 
04:11
SHOULD I PUBLISH IN AN OPEN ACCESS JOURNAL? Deciding whether to publish in an Open Access journal or a traditional, subscription journal is an important one. This video details what points to consider when making this decision, in regard to scholarly publishing. MORE VIDEOS on deciding about publishing in an Open Access journal: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3jGxJAKviOyWjC4WuQc91Tu FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi there, I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to be discussing if you should publish in an Open Access journal? For many authors or researchers, the first step in the publication process is deciding whether to publish in an Open Access journal or in a traditional subscription or closed publication. The idea is that Open Access will deliver more downloads, more readers, and therefore a wider exposure to their work. On the flip side, many Open Access journal charge a fee. Many are newer publications and may not have the cache of the some older, more established subscription or society publications have. As a reminder, Open Access means there are no barriers to accessing or reading the articles in a journal such as needing a subscription. There are also limited or no copyright restrictions to the articles. There are several models for Open Access or OA. Gold OA is the most common one. Under Gold OA, the journal may have various business models. One might be to charge an APC or Author Processing Charge which could range from several hundred dollars to several thousand dollars. FYI according to the Directory of Open Access Journals 60% of all OA journals don’t charge an APC fee to the author. Check out DOAJ.org which calls itself, “s a community-curated list of open access journals and aims to be the starting point for all information searches for quality, peer reviewed open access material.” Another model is Green OA. Under this model the author self-archives their article at a publicly available repository run by someone such as at a university. So, in deciding whether to go Open Access there are five decision points: First, is the journal an established and legitimate journal. Jeffrey Beall, a librarian from Colorado, has done a great work in identifying predatory publishers that accept basically all articles and do no peer review or work on the manuscript. They just charge an APC and post your material. Check if the journal you are considering is on his list of predatory publications. A link to this list is posted at the end of this video. To confirm the journal conforms to accepted practices you can also check the DOAJ site to see there are listed there, although some legitimate ones may not be on this voluntary list. Second, confirm the publication is peer reviewed. Peer review is the bed rock of quality research. Third, what metrics are used to measure the articles or publication against their peers. Does the journal have an Impact Factor? An H Index? Altmetrics or alternative metrics for its social media engagements or shares. If it has these or other metrics, how do the compare to other journals in their field? Fourth, check where the journal is indexed. Is it in Google Scholar, Medline, CINAHL, or whatever index applies to your individual field? The most important thing for the journal is exposure and indexing directly helps with that exposure. Finally, reputation is key. Ask your colleagues about any publication in your particular field and how it is perceived. Many Open Access are high quality publications ones and are leaders in their field. Whether to pay an APC, if they charge one, may be a deciding factor. At the end of the day, the reputation of the journal and how widely it is distributed or available to readers are the key decision points. These two factors are important and that is the decision point as whether to publish in Open Access or not. Well that’s it. Click here to subscribe to my YouTube channel or to see the playlist as to dealing with the decision point as to publishing in Open Access or not or leave me a comment below or send me an email. Thanks a lot and take care.
Views: 5142 John Bond
Stossel: Academic Hoax
 
06:38
Journals applaud seven outrageously fake papers. --------- Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://youtube.com/reasontv Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Reason.Magaz... Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/reason Subscribe to our podcast at iTunes: https://goo.gl/az3a7a Reason is the planet's leading source of news, politics, and culture from a libertarian perspective. Go to reason.com for a point of view you won't get from legacy media and old left-right opinion magazines. --------- Three academics conducted what they call a "grievance studies" experiment. They wrote fake papers on ridiculous subjects and submitted them to prominent academic journals in fields that study gender, race, and sexuality. They did this to "expose a political corruption that has taken hold of the universities," say the hoaxers in a video which documented the process. John Stossel interviewed James Lindsay and Peter Boghossian who, along with Helen Pluckrose, sent so-called research papers to 20 journals. They were surprised when seven papers were accepted. One claimed that "dog humping incidents at dog parks" can be taken as "evidence of rape culture." It was honored as "excellent scholarship." Another paper rewrote a section of Adolf Hitler's Mein Kampf as intersectional feminism. Stossel assumed that the journals would apologize for publishing nonsense and question the quality of their scholarship. But instead they criticized the the hoaxers, complaining that they "engaged in flawed and unethical research." Of course, that was the point of the hoax. Boghossian is unapologetic, telling Stossel the hoax shows "scholarship in these disciplines is utterly corrupted … they have placed an agenda before the truth." When Stossel suggests, "maybe you are just conservative hacks looking to defend your white privilege." Lindsay replied "I've never voted for a Republican in my life." Boghossian added, "Nor have I." Stossel says what upsets him is that after the hoax "no university said 'we're not gonna use these journals' and no editor publicly said, 'we have to raise our standards.'" Instead, Portland State University began disciplinary procedures against Boghossian. The views expressed in this video are solely those of John Stossel; his independent production company, Stossel Productions; and the people he interviews. The claims and opinions set forth in the video and accompanying text are not necessarily those of Reason.
Views: 104769 ReasonTV
What is Predatory Publishing?
 
03:33
WHAT IS PREDATORY PUBLISHING? How does it relates to Open Access. How do I avoid predatory journals? This short video gives a quick overview of these terms as they relate to scholarly publishing. MORE VIDEOS on Predatory Publishing: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3hmdstctVjsHj6zB7Sxw8yN FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi. This is John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am to going to give an overview of predatory publishing. Predatory publishing is when an author pays to publish an article and the publisher or the journal provides little or no services. Predatory publishing is most closely associated with open access. A reminder, open access has two factors. One where the material is free of any barriers to access which means its available to anyone, anywhere, at any time. Also there are few or no limitations to its use such as a a copyright restriction. OA authors usually pay APC, or Author Processing Charge when their article is accepted for publication. This fee may be several hundred dollars all the way up $3,000 or even higher. This is where the predatory part comes in. As the industry started to migrate from the subscription model to the author pays model some outright illegal or unethical practices started to emerge. Typically, a journal would receive a scholarly article and have it peer reviewed. If the article met the journal’s quality standards and guidelines, then the journal might accept that article. Once accepted, it might be professionally edited and a format or layout applied to it. The author would see these changes and, once approved, the article would be published and posted online. A predatory journal might have a very high acceptance rate, perhaps 100%. The article might never have been peer reviewed. Also, a human may never have read the article or edited it. The original manuscript might be used instead of a typeset or formatted version. And the author might never have seen any of the changes or, in this case, the lack of them. Predatory journals are concentrating more on the money aspect of OA then on the quality or how the discipline is being furthered. So how do you spot a predatory publisher? Jeffrey Beall, a librarian at the University of Colorado, has been instrumental in identifying these journals and these publishers. A link to the list he created is listed at the end of this video. Here are some other ways to spot predatory publishers: Is the journal very aggressive in asking you to submit an article? Check with your colleagues about the reputation of the publication. Read some articles online and look at the quality yourself. Do you recognize colleagues or institutions that are familiar to you? How are the articles edited? Are they relatively error free? How about the website? Is it user-friendly? And finally, with the editorial board, are there people you recognize on there? If you continue to have doubts, feel free to reach out to one you may know, or know of, and ask their opinion of the publication and how often they review for the publication. At the end of the day, quality and peer review are key. More on that later. Well that’s it. Click on the link here to subscribe to my YouTube channel or to see more videos discussing predatory publishing. And leave a comment below or send me an email. Thank you very much and take care.
Views: 1899 John Bond
VSRD Academic Publishing : Login Creation
 
09:35
VSRD Academic Publishing : Login Creation
Tips from a journal editor: How to select a journal for your paper?
 
13:13
In this video, Bruce Dancik reveals what journal editors actually look for in a manuscript. He provides useful tips on how an author can find out which journal would be interested to publish his/her research and explains some of the important factors that an author should consider while choosing a suitable journal. This video is a part of an interview series in which Donald Samulack, President, US Operations, Editage, Cactus Communications, speaks to Bruce P. Dancik, Editor-in-Chief, NRC Research Press/Canadian Science Publishing, and Professor Emeritus, Dept. of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, at the 54th Annual Meet of the Council of Science Editors in 2011. For more insights into the publication process, visit http://www.editage.com/insights/
Views: 16842 Editage Insights
HOW TO PUBLISH IN JOURNALS AS A MED STUDENT
 
04:09
Do you want to learn how to publish your work in a journal as a medical student? This is a really important but challenging thing to do. In this video I share my top tips on how to maxmise your chances for success!
Views: 2204 All Access Medicine
How to Write a Research Paper
 
10:47
I'm going to go over the steps you can take to write your first research paper! Research papers have long been something only academics did, but the Internet has offered us several ways to democratize this process. Journals like Arxiv are open for public submissions, machine learning papers are generally open source so anyone can learn from them, and online communities offer advice in the way previously only a professor could. I'll go through these tips in order in as much detail as I can on how to write a research paper. Please Subscribe! And like. And comment. That's what keeps me going. Want more education? Connect with me here: Twitter: https://twitter.com/sirajraval Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sirajology instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sirajraval More learning resources: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1AYxMbYZQ1Y https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UiTaxAfIBPg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oPobmEZ4lfs&t=242s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KlgR1q3UQZE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DS2DOEkorDo&t=220s OpenAI's request for research: https://openai.com/requests-for-research/ Some of my papers: http://www.sirajcoin.io/whitepaper.html https://docs.google.com/document/d/1QFyBUV8pKqgl__4J1zT0BmIYfTYF8hnlyalOo7PJvLM/edit?usp=sharing (i turned this one into a book actually [Decentralized Applications]) Join us in the Wizards Slack channel: http://wizards.herokuapp.com/ And please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3191693 Signup for my newsletter for exciting updates in the field of AI: https://goo.gl/FZzJ5w Hit the Join button above to sign up to become a member of my channel for access to exclusive content!
Views: 172630 Siraj Raval
How to Get Published in a Peer-Reviewed Journal: Part 1- Planning and Execution
 
07:37
Dr. Cynthia Dunbar Blood Editor-in-Chief (2008-2012) National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; National Institutes of Health; Bethesda, MD