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13 Tips for Writing a Great Journal Article
 
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13 TIPS FOR WRITING A GREAT JOURNAL ARTICLE: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting gives tips on writing a journal article. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I have 13 tips for writing a great academic article or paper. First, let us start before any writing has occurred. Think about whether the effort is justified. Is the topic new and novel in the field? Is the article about a particularly timely topic in your area? Don’t just write an article because you can; rather look to make a difference. Second, think about where you want to submit the manuscript. Be a loyal reader of any journal you intend to submit to; do not just pick one out of an online search. Know the mission of the publication. This will allow you to focus your writing on that journal. Third, follow the instruction or guidelines for authors for that journal very closely, particularly in regard to length and format. Now, let us look at mechanics. The fourth tip is to follow closely the appropriate style manual. Whether the AMA, APA, Chicago style guides, or others, you will benefit by understanding these guidelines in your field. Fifth, short and concise is always better. This applies to the entire manuscript but also to sentence length and paragraph length as well. No one ever said, “I wish that paper was longer.” Ruthlessly delete all extraneous materials. Sixth, follow accepted practices in regard to grammar and style. If you do not know the expected practices find someone that does. Also, read the articles in the journals you are submitting to so you can understand the tone of these articles. Now, let us look at the content presentation. Seventh, when the paper is written, review the abstract very, very closely. Many people will read only the abstract and it needs to be flawless. Make sure it conforms to the abstract format in your intended publication. Eight, consider the article title very carefully. Avoid a boring title which is really just a label. Consider something thought provoking or maybe even provocative, but do not stray so far that it is corny or sensational. Ninth, make sure any tables, charts, images, or graphics are essential and created in a quality fashion. Does each item standalone by itself? Lastly, let us consider the review of the manuscript before submission. My tenth tip is to read the final manuscript aloud several times. This helps for clarity and language. Eleventh, aside from having the content reviewed by your peers before submission, have others outside your field read the paper as well. Listen closely to any suggestions they have. Twelfth, avoid any hint of plagiarism. Always cite your sources. Never take any passage or ideas from others. An error here can affect your career or reputation. Finally, I know many people that watch these videos are non-English language speakers that may be submitting to an English language journal. If so, I suggest having a native English language colleague or speaker read and help craft the paper before submission. This will likely increase the quality of the final product and therefore increase the likelihood of acceptance. If you do not know anyone to help with this, there are many editorial services that will now assist for a fee. Or email me for suggestions of editors that can help with this. At the end of the day, there is no secret to success. Attention to detail and a careful review of the language will hopefully improve your work.
Views: 9933 John Bond
What to think about before you start to write a journal article
 
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Discover the four A’s with editor Professor David Simon, as he offers advice on what to think about before you start to write an article. About us: Taylor & Francis Group partners with world-class authors, from leading scientists and researchers, to scholars and professionals operating at the top of their fields. Together, we publish in all areas of the Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, Technology and Medicine sectors. We are one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, eBooks, text books and reference works. For more author insights follow us at: https://www.facebook.com/tandfauthorservices https://twitter.com/tandfauthorserv https://www.linkedin.com/company/taylor-&-francis-group To browse our 2600+ journals visit: http://www.tandfonline.com And learn more about Informa at: https://informa.com/
Views: 67007 Taylor & Francis
What is Academic Publishing?
 
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WHAT IS ACADEMIC PUBLISHING?: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting defines academic publishing. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com MORE VIDEOS on what Academic Publishing is can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3icGmNLx9Wk6eUyeeTRR0uM JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process” To find out more about the book: https://www.riverwindsconsulting.com/rfps Buy it at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Request-Proposal-Publishing-Managing-Process-ebook/dp/B071W7MBLM/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1497619963&sr=1-1&keywords=john+bond+rfps SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPTHi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to give a broad overview of what is scholarly or academic publishing. To start with publishing is the broad term for the dissemination of knowledge. Traditional publishing can take many forms: books, monographs, or textbooks; journals or magazines; newspapers. All of these may now be in paper or electronic form or both. Now education or information can be in many other forms: videos, podcasts, learning modules, webinars, and many, many more. This knowledge can be distributed for free or at a cost, such as purchasing a product or via a subscription. The traditional steps of publishing are: product or content acquisitions, copy editing, production or page make up, printing or posting in the appropriate electronic form, and then marketing and distribution. Academic or scholarly publishing is an important part of publishing. The goal of scholarly publishing is to disseminate academic research and scholarship. The traditional ways have been through journals and books, but increasing other avenues exist as well. A few points distinguish scholarly publishing from general or trade publishing. First is peer review whereby experts in the field review the content to ensure accuracy and to determine the material advances the field of study. This helps a journal or the like be selective and that it ensures that quality content is published. Scholarly publishing many times is very specialized. An important trend in scholarly publishing is open access, whereby the content is free to almost anyone with internet access. The author or a funder pays for the publication of the material and there usually are few restrictions on its use or reuse. An incredible amount of content is created each year in academic publishing. There are perhaps 35,000 peer review journals in the world today that publish between two and two and half million peer reviewed articles each year. What qualifies as a publisher is now broader than ever before. Traditionally for-profit publishers, associations or societies, university presses and some others covered the constellation of groups that published content. Now open access organizations like PLOS or BioMed Central, content aggregators, websites, video channels like YouTube, social media sites, and many, many others count themselves rightly as publishers. In scholarly publishing, there may be between 2,000 to 3,000 or organizations publishing or creating content today, depending on how they are counted. How publishers describe themselves reflects the changing times. Elsevier, a large publisher, tags itself as “An Information Analytics Company, Empowering Knowledge.” Another publisher, Wolters Kluwer, says it “provides information, software, and services.” And Wiley says it is a global provider of “content-enabled solutions to improve outcomes in research, education and professional practice.” Note none of these say publish, books, or journals in their description. And things will only continue to evolve and change even more. Thank heavens.
Views: 1379 John Bond
How Open-Access Journals Are Transforming Science
 
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Academic publishers are locking up the latest research behind paywalls and hurting science, says Michael Eisen. We spoke with the co-founder of the Public Library of Science about democratizing scientific progress. Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://youtube.com/reasontv Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Reason.Magazine/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/reason Subscribe to our podcast at iTunes: https://goo.gl/az3a7a Reason is the planet's leading source of news, politics, and culture from a libertarian perspective. Go to reason.com for a point of view you won't get from legacy media and old left-right opinion magazines. ---------------- Michael Eisen's goal is to change the way scientific findings are disseminated. Most research papers today are locked behind paywalls, and access can cost hundreds of dollars per article. The general public, and most scientists, don't have comprehensive access to the most up-to-date research, even though much of it is funded by U.S. taxpayers. "It's a completely ridiculous system," says Eisen, an acclaimed biologist at UC Berkeley, an independent candidate for Senate in California running against Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D), and a co-founder of the Public Library of Science, or PLOS, which publishes some of the largest and most prestigious academic journals in the world. These publications stand out for another reason: They're open access, meaning that anyone with an internet connection can read them for free. PLOS seeks to break up the academic publishing cartel, and it's a leading force in the so-called open science movement, which aims to give the public access to cutting-edge research and democratize scientific progress. This movement became widely publicized after famed hacker and Reddit co-founder Aaron Swartz sought to upend the publishing system by uploading millions of articles for free; he was prosecuted relentlessly, and ultimately committed suicide in 2013. Eisen first thought he could simply convince his fellow scientists to start uploading their work, but that didn't work because universities and funding agencies use journals as a proxy for quality. They base tenure and award decisions in large part on how many articles a researcher publishes, and on the reputations of the publishers. To encourage a switch in researchers' thinking, PLOS's first journal, PLOS Biology, attempted to emulate what Eisen describes as the "snooty" journals such as Science and Nature, which generate prestige in part by rejecting most submitted papers. PLOS Biology became well regarded and provided a proof of concept for PLOS's model, in which funding agencies or universities pay a flat fee up front (typically $1,500, but adjusted based on ability to pay) that's then made accessible for free. The multidisciplinary journal PLOS ONE, created in 2006, used this same model to become the largest academic publication in the world, though it's been surpassed by other open access sources. PLOS ONE puts papers through a fairly typical peer review process, but it doesn't ask editors to determine a paper's importance; the journal will publish any study that follows sound science and reports its data. According to Eisen, this model encourages more thorough experiments, rather than flashy results that aren't reproducible, and allows readers to determine whether a particular study is important and valid. Reason spoke with Eisen at the BioHack the Planet Conference in Oakland, a gathering for DIY scientists known as biohackers who eschew traditional research institutions. They often carry out experiments in garage labs and share their raw findings on the internet in real time, a publishing model to which Eisen believes all scientists should aspire. Eisen also discussed why scientists and universities continue to prop up the academic publishing monopoly, how scientific progress suffers from the current regime, why he's running for senate as an independent, why he beleives political parties are obsolete, and the way forward for the open science movement. Produced by Justin Monticello. Cameras by Alexis Garcia and Monticello. Music by Silent Partner (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ha94-6CQdo0), Vibe Tracks (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3-fPJLhcato), and MK2 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2GRv3HYpoU).
Views: 12410 ReasonTV
All Scientific Papers Should Be Free; Here's Why They're Not
 
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Have you ever tried to access scientific research but the website says you have to pay? Why is that? Shouldn't information be free? Who Pays For Science? - https://youtu.be/L7oklmbtxoY Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here - http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Read More: Who Pick Up the Tab for Science? http://www.bu.edu/research/articles/funding-for-scientific-research/ "Scientists say that much of the public-and many politicians-do not have a general understanding of the scientific process, knowledge critical for smart decision-making in our increasingly technological society." Peer Review at Science Publications http://www.sciencemag.org/authors/peer-review-science-publications "For in-depth review, at least two outside referees are consulted. Reviewers are contacted before being sent a paper and are asked to return comments within 1 to 2 weeks for most papers. Reviewers may be selected to evaluate separate components of a manuscript." Vestiges of print publications in scientific journals https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/information-culture/vestiges-of-print-publication-in-scientific-journals/ "The first scientific journals were published in the late 17th century, and these print publications changed very little over time. Developments in printing technology, distribution and the advent of the commercial publisher all impacted the process, but the basic form was easily recognizable." ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos daily. Watch More DNews on Seeker http://www.seeker.com/show/dnews/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/+dnews Seeker http://www.seeker.com/ Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here: http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Written By: Trace Dominguez
Views: 152896 Seeker
Academic Workshop Publishing A Journal Article
 
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LPDP MONASH UNI WORKSHOP
Views: 303 Alinda Chrisly
What is ACADEMIC PUBLISHING? What does ACADEMIC PUBLISHING mean?
 
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What is ACADEMIC PUBLISHING? What does ACADEMIC PUBLISHING mean? Academic publishing is the subfield of publishing which distributes academic research and scholarship. Most academic work is published in academic journal article, book or thesis form. The part of academic written output that is not formally published but merely printed up or posted on the Internet is often called "grey literature". Most scientific and scholarly journals, and many academic and scholarly books, though not all, are based on some form of peer review or editorial refereeing to qualify texts for publication. Peer review quality and selectivity standards vary greatly from journal to journal, publisher to publisher, and field to field. Most established academic disciplines have their own journals and other outlets for publication, although many academic journals are somewhat interdisciplinary, and publish work from several distinct fields or subfields. There is also a tendency for existing journals to divide into specialized sections as the field itself becomes more specialized. Along with the variation in review and publication procedures, the kinds of publications that are accepted as contributions to knowledge or research differ greatly among fields and subfields. Academic publishing is undergoing major changes, as it makes the transition from the print to the electronic format. Business models are different in the electronic environment. Since the early 1990s, licensing of electronic resources, particularly journals, has been very common. Currently, an important trend, particularly with respect to journals in the sciences, is open access via the Internet. In open access publishing a journal article is made available free for all on the web by the publisher at the time of publication. It is typically made possible after the author pays hundreds or thousands of dollars in publication fees, thereby shifting the costs from the reader to the researcher or their funder. The Internet has facilitated open access self-archiving, in which authors themselves make a copy of their published articles available free for all on the web.
Views: 133 The Audiopedia
Leadership Lab: Publishing in Academic Journals
 
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Publishing in academic journals can present unfamiliar challenges without clear-cut solutions. What should you publish, and when? How to find the right journal for your submission? How to respond to feedback from anonymous readers? In this workshop, a panel of faculty members and journal editors will shed light on the publishing process, and answer any questions you may have. Panelists: -Susan Allen, Managing Editor, American Journal of Sociology -John Brehm, Professor of Political Science, author of numerous single-author and joint-author articles -Jan Goldstein, Norman and Edna Freehling Professor of History, the Conceptual and Historical Studies of Science, and the College, editor of the Journal of Modern History -Linda Smith, Assistant Director of the University of Chicago Writing Program
The process of academic publishing and academic portfolio management
 
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The panel discussion on the Process of Academic Publishing and Academic Portfolio Management addressed the "do's and dont's" of academic publishing and provided suggestions on building a solid academic reputation. Key points covered included: the process from project to publication; publication ethics; technical writing and prepping for acceptance; increasing citations; the differences between journal and conference publishing; and the editorial process. Panelists: Carrie Christensen (Publisher, Engineering, Elsevier) Elena Porro (Editorial Director, Cell Press) Albert Meyer (Professor in EECS and Editor in Chief for Information and Computation) Richard Braatz (Professor in Chemical Engineering, MIT) Organized by the Graduate Student Council Academics, Research, and Careers committee; recorded by the Office of the Dean for Graduate Education.
Views: 241 MIT ODGE
How to get a paper published in a high impact journal?
 
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Clare Llewellyn (UK)
Views: 23904 EASO Obesity
How to Write a Paper in a Weekend (By Prof. Pete Carr)
 
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In this video, Prof. Carr (faculty member at the University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry) is explaining the Algorithm of writing a paper in a weekend.
How to Write for Academic Journal?
 
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ISET Policy Institute Dr. Randall Filer, Hunter College, the City University of New York - discusses Dos and Don'ts of writing for academic journals. This video is best for people who are looking for some tips in academic writing - especially those who are aiming their papers to high-end journals.
Views: 25005 ISETchannel
The Structure and Economics of Scholarly Publishing
 
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On Friday, April 17, the UO Libraries hosted a talk by Carl T. Bergstrom, a University of Washington evolutionary biologist and well-known analyst of the scholarly communications industry. Bergstrom's talk is entitled "The Structure and Economics of Scholarly Publishing." Bergstrom is an expert on the economics of journal publishing and has developed a tool called the "eigenfactor," which provides an alternative to the impact factors currently used to rank journals. Bergstrom also discussed the sky-rocketing rates libraries and others have to pay for subscriptions to scholarly journals. Subscription rates have quickly outpaced library budgets for journal acquisitions and have limited their ability to provide university faculty members with ready access to journal articles.
How to Publish a Journal Article - Part One
 
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Dr Lucinda Becker at the University of Reading provides a practical two-part video presentation on how to get your journal article published
Views: 22510 SAGE
How To Submit an Article in Elsevier Journal
 
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Sorry for the spelling mistakes in the video, there are many. This describes the process to submit an article to a journal published by Elsevier.
Views: 59959 ET Beacon Project
Professor John Antonakis discusses the five diseases of academic publishing
 
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To learn more about the five diseases of academic publishing refer to the following article: Antonakis, J. (2017). On doing better science: From thrill of discovery to policy implications. The Leadership Quarterly, 28(1), 5-21. It is available on the Elsevier website: https://www.elsevier.com/connect/5-diseases-ailing-research-and-how-to-cure-them You may also contact Prof. John Antonakis directly at [email protected]
Views: 462 HECLausanneofficial
2018 Trends in Scholarly Publishing
 
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TRENDS IN SCHOLARLY PUBLISHING FOR 2018: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting some of the trends in publishing in 2018. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPTS Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about the trends in scholarly publishing for 2018. The academic publishing world continues to be buffeted by change. Whether this is positive or negative is in the eye of the beholder. Here is a random list of the key topics presenting opportunities and threats to the world of publishing. First, open access will evolve further. The players will continue to change as the commercialization of OA affects how it is perceived. Services connected to open access will expand. Key players may merge, be bought, or change their model. Second, preprints will continue to change the landscape of publishing. The more preprints are accepted in scholarly publishing and in academia, the more the subscription and OA models will be changed in regard to their perceived value. Third, will be an ongoing concern about the economy and its effect on scholarly publishing. Whether it is a market correction in 2018, change in government funding in the US and the trickle-down affect (or assault) on library budgets, or continue Mergers and Acquisitions activity; business and financial issues will stay on the front of people’s minds. Fourth, voice search will make inroads into scholarly publishing specifically with intelligent personal assistants like Siri, Alexa, and a growing list. Publishers will need to be vigilant in their preparation of their content and SEO procedures for the future in the world of voice search. Fifth, Sci-Hub will remain in the news and cause disruption. Woe to those publishers that are not thinking through authentication as well as how to deal with these types of services. Sixth, delivering content in video and audio form will grow with customer demand. Many publishers are using innovative ways to deliver journal abstracts, news articles, continuing education to mobile customers and readers as the usage numbers are skyrocketing. Seventh, machine learning will increase in the impact on scholarly content. Publishers will find opportunities with machine learning and artificial intelligence to partner with research institutions and others to create innovative non-book or journal products. And there many more I could discuss. How will the net-neutrality fight affect publishers? Also, topics such as workflows, accessibility for content, increased services provided by publishers will all present opportunities for publishing. How will it all turn out? Stay tuned over the next 12 months. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist to see more of my videos. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 838 John Bond
How to Write a Research Paper
 
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I'm going to go over the steps you can take to write your first research paper! Research papers have long been something only academics did, but the Internet has offered us several ways to democratize this process. Journals like Arxiv are open for public submissions, machine learning papers are generally open source so anyone can learn from them, and online communities offer advice in the way previously only a professor could. I'll go through these tips in order in as much detail as I can on how to write a research paper. Please Subscribe! And like. And comment. That's what keeps me going. Want more education? Connect with me here: Twitter: https://twitter.com/sirajraval Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sirajology instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sirajraval More learning resources: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1AYxMbYZQ1Y https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UiTaxAfIBPg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oPobmEZ4lfs&t=242s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KlgR1q3UQZE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DS2DOEkorDo&t=220s OpenAI's request for research: https://openai.com/requests-for-research/ Some of my papers: http://www.sirajcoin.io/whitepaper.html https://docs.google.com/document/d/1QFyBUV8pKqgl__4J1zT0BmIYfTYF8hnlyalOo7PJvLM/edit?usp=sharing (i turned this one into a book actually [Decentralized Applications]) Join us in the Wizards Slack channel: http://wizards.herokuapp.com/ And please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3191693 Signup for my newsletter for exciting updates in the field of AI: https://goo.gl/FZzJ5w Hit the Join button above to sign up to become a member of my channel for access to exclusive content!
Views: 145473 Siraj Raval
How to Write and Publish a Scientific Paper
 
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Publishing papers is how new discoveries are shared across the scientific community. Here at IRIS, we think that student researchers have just as much cause to be writing up their research as any other researcher. To demystify the process, we've made a couple of videos in collaboration with Institute of Physics Publishing, explaining the paper writing process. In this video we look at what actually goes into a paper; what to write, what order to write it in, how to write it, and what to do with your finished paper. Music by Lee Rosevere Video by Poppy Illsley
How to publish a journal article - part two
 
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Dr Lucinda Becker at the University of Reading provides a practical two-part video presentation on how to get your journal article published.
Views: 5197 SAGE
ISI Indexed Journals
 
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One major milestone and requirement in any scientific study is publishing articles in reliable academic journals, including ISI indexed journals. In order to achieve this, you might want to become familiar with some key terms in this field. What does ISI stand for? What are the differences between ISI-indexed journals and ISI-listed journals? How can you differentiate between ISI-indexed journals and ISI-listed journals? In addition to the above, specific terms used to introduce and describe a journal will be described in this course, such as Impact Factor, Immediacy Index, Eigenfactor, etc…
New York Times decries academics for publishing in fake journals, fails to see irony
 
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The New York Times recently published an article in their science section entitled, " Many Academics Are Eager to Publish in Worthless Journals," without an ounce of self-awareness. The Resident discusses. Follow The Resident at http://www.twitter.com/TheResident Find RT America in your area: http://rt.com/where-to-watch/ Or watch us online: http://rt.com/on-air/rt-america-air/ Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTAmerica Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_America
Views: 2498 RT America
Joe Rogan Experience #1191 - Peter Boghossian & James Lindsay
 
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Peter Boghossian is a philosophy instructor, activist, author, speaker, and atheism advocate. He is a full-time faculty member at Portland State University. James Lindsay has a Ph.D. in mathematics and a background in physics and is also the author of three books.
Views: 1299522 PowerfulJRE
What is a Scholarly Journal Article?
 
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Someday soon, you'll need to find a scholarly journal article for a project or research paper. Awesome. No problem. But, wait a second, what is a "scholarly journal article?" How is it different from a popular source like a newspaper or magazine article? Good question! Let's break down the differences. Scholarly journals enable scholars -- experts in a particular academic field -- to communicate their research with other experts by publishing articles and to stay current by reading about other scholars' work. Consequently, scholarly journals create a community of experts who are all participating in a kind of "conversation" in that academic field. Rather than a face-to-face conversation, this is a formal conversation, which takes place over months and years through these scholarly articles. The most important part of this long term written conversation - what makes it a "scholarly" conversation - is what's called the "peer review process." The peer review process works like this: in order for a scholar to get published in a scholarly journal, his or her expert peers must first read their work and critique it. These "peer reviewers" make sure the scholar has made valid arguments, and that he or she has cited appropriate experts in the field to support the argument. This is why you may hear scholarly articles referred to as peer-reviewed articles. These terms are often used interchangeably. This rigorous evaluation process ensures scholarly work meets a higher standard than popular publications and allows other scholars to rely on these articles for their own research. So, why is this important for you? First, the information in a scholarly text has been carefully evaluated, so it is more reliable and credible than information in popular sources. Second, reading scholarly journal articles for your projects can give you insight into professional argumentation and research practices. Finally, every scholarly text has extensive bibliographies that introduce you to important texts in the field, which can help you extend your research in that area. When you read the articles and books the scholar cited in his or her article, you are taking part in the scholarly conversation -- and getting leads additional sources! Okay, so where are these scholarly articles hiding? Let's say you're in a research database and you only want scholarly articles. How do you do it? In EBSCO's Academic Search Complete, you check the box for "Scholarly (Peer Reviewed) Journals" before clicking the search button. This limits the search results to material found in peer-reviewed publications. Note that some material in these publications, such as book reviews and editorials, may not be peer-reviewed. To make sure, click the article title and check that the document type is an "article" or "journal article." Other research databases have similar interfaces. For more information, please, Ask Us.
Academics expose corruption in Grievance Studies
 
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This playlist is the best way to learn about the The Grievance Studies Affair' and track the story as it unfolds - https://bit.ly/2zkBKBn This is first video revealing the behind-the-scenes story of how a trio of concerned left-wing academics (James Lindsay, Peter Boghossian and Helen Pluckrose) published seven intentionally absurd papers in leading scholarly journals in what has become known as 'The Grievance Studies Affair'. This series is associated with a feature-length documentary I'm working on. My plan is to play around with some of the footage I gather and upload it here to generate an audience and have a creative outlet while I learn about the complicated subject matter. My usual sources of film funding are blocked off to me because of the sensitive subject matter and the slow approach I'm taking. If you think what I'm doing is valuable and you're in a position to help, you can support the project here - https://www.patreon.com/mikenayna For anyone uncomfortable with Patreon, one-off transfers can be done here - https://paypal.me/mikenayna Read the full papers and project fact sheet: http://bit.ly/2OsWnnH The Wall Street Journal's take: https://www.wsj.com/articles/fake-news-comes-to-academia-1538520950 Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/pb/outlook/2018/10/04/paper-that-would-never-have-gotten-past-peer-review-criticizes-academy-film New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/06/opinion/grievance-studies-hoax.html Mother Jones: https://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2018/10/cultural-studies-is-the-target-of-another-hoax-and-this-one-stings/ The Times: https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/journals-publish-hoaxers-absurd-gender-studies-q7f60l7v6 The Australian: https://www.theaustralian.com.au/higher-education/a-degree-of-shame-as-academics-fall-for-grievance-studies-hoax/news-story/f5dd6380dac3cd42406ed21a689203f8 Buzzfeed: https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/virginiahughes/grievance-studies-sokal-hoax Ben Shapiro May Never Stop LOLing At This: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PwFmrI5QQFI Featuring: James Lindsay (@ConceptualJames) Peter Boghossian (@peterboghossian) Helen Pluckrose (@HPluckrose) Mike Nayna (@MikeNayna) NOTE: This video is cleared for fair use on the provision this source video is embedded or a prominent hyperlink to this video features in your content. I ask that you please respect all of the individuals that appear in my videos and keep your thoughts and feelings to the video in the comment thread. #GrievanceStudies #TheyDontSpeakForMe #PeterBoghossian #JamesLindsay #HelenPluckrose #MikeNayna #SokalSquared #GrievanceStudiesAffair #GenderStudies #Feminism #Intersectionality #JoeRogan
Views: 710170 Mike Nayna
Publishing Your First Research Paper
 
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My brother, who is in the third (penultimate) year of his PhD, briefly shares his experience of publishing his first ever research paper in a scientific journal. Are you a researcher? Have you published or are thinking of publishing a paper? If so, please do leave me a comment below. Hope this video helped and thanks for watching! :)
Views: 26148 MyTake
How to Read a Research Paper
 
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Ever wondered how I consume research so fast? I'm going to describe the process i use to read lots of machine learning research papers fast and efficiently. It's basically a 3-pass approach, i'll go over the details and show you the extra resources I use to learn these advanced topics. You don't have to be a PhD, anyone can read research papers. It just takes practice and patience. Please Subscribe! And like. And comment. That's what keeps me going. Want more education? Connect with me here: Twitter: https://twitter.com/sirajraval Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sirajology instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sirajraval More learning resources: http://www.arxiv-sanity.com/ https://www.reddit.com/r/MachineLearning/ https://www.elsevier.com/connect/infographic-how-to-read-a-scientific-paper https://www.quora.com/How-do-I-start-reading-research-papers-on-Machine-Learning https://www.reddit.com/r/MachineLearning/comments/6rj9r4/d_how_do_you_read_mathheavy_machine_learning/ https://machinelearningmastery.com/how-to-research-a-machine-learning-algorithm/ http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2016/03/how-seriously-read-scientific-paper Join us in the Wizards Slack channel: http://wizards.herokuapp.com/ And please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3191693 Signup for my newsletter for exciting updates in the field of AI: https://goo.gl/FZzJ5w Hit the Join button above to sign up to become a member of my channel for access to exclusive content!
Views: 204869 Siraj Raval
Publishing Academic Articles: Who, What, When, Where, How and Why?
 
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This 45-minute talk explores the basics of academic journal publishing in history: the reasons why one publishes journal articles, deciding what to submit, selecting a journal, preparing a manuscript for submission; navigating peer review; and making the best use of criticism.
Views: 39 Paul Kramer
What is Predatory Publishing?
 
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WHAT IS PREDATORY PUBLISHING? How does it relates to Open Access. How do I avoid predatory journals? This short video gives a quick overview of these terms as they relate to scholarly publishing. MORE VIDEOS on Predatory Publishing: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3hmdstctVjsHj6zB7Sxw8yN FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi. This is John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am to going to give an overview of predatory publishing. Predatory publishing is when an author pays to publish an article and the publisher or the journal provides little or no services. Predatory publishing is most closely associated with open access. A reminder, open access has two factors. One where the material is free of any barriers to access which means its available to anyone, anywhere, at any time. Also there are few or no limitations to its use such as a a copyright restriction. OA authors usually pay APC, or Author Processing Charge when their article is accepted for publication. This fee may be several hundred dollars all the way up $3,000 or even higher. This is where the predatory part comes in. As the industry started to migrate from the subscription model to the author pays model some outright illegal or unethical practices started to emerge. Typically, a journal would receive a scholarly article and have it peer reviewed. If the article met the journal’s quality standards and guidelines, then the journal might accept that article. Once accepted, it might be professionally edited and a format or layout applied to it. The author would see these changes and, once approved, the article would be published and posted online. A predatory journal might have a very high acceptance rate, perhaps 100%. The article might never have been peer reviewed. Also, a human may never have read the article or edited it. The original manuscript might be used instead of a typeset or formatted version. And the author might never have seen any of the changes or, in this case, the lack of them. Predatory journals are concentrating more on the money aspect of OA then on the quality or how the discipline is being furthered. So how do you spot a predatory publisher? Jeffrey Beall, a librarian at the University of Colorado, has been instrumental in identifying these journals and these publishers. A link to the list he created is listed at the end of this video. Here are some other ways to spot predatory publishers: Is the journal very aggressive in asking you to submit an article? Check with your colleagues about the reputation of the publication. Read some articles online and look at the quality yourself. Do you recognize colleagues or institutions that are familiar to you? How are the articles edited? Are they relatively error free? How about the website? Is it user-friendly? And finally, with the editorial board, are there people you recognize on there? If you continue to have doubts, feel free to reach out to one you may know, or know of, and ask their opinion of the publication and how often they review for the publication. At the end of the day, quality and peer review are key. More on that later. Well that’s it. Click on the link here to subscribe to my YouTube channel or to see more videos discussing predatory publishing. And leave a comment below or send me an email. Thank you very much and take care.
Views: 1750 John Bond
Sciencelevate: What is online publishing? Academic publishing? Short video
 
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This is a short video showing what is online publishing. Sciencelevate is an International publisher of scientific articles. Sciencelevate features journals like: 1. Journal of Brain Disorders and Neuropsychiatry Treatments 2. Global Journal of Cosmetics and Women's Health 3. Global Journal of Pharmaceutical Developments and Drug Innovations 4. Journal of Physics Innovation and Research Studies 5. Journal of Medical Research Advancements and Surgical Innovations 6. Journal of Diabetes and Genetic Disorder Remedies We aim to provide service to the literature dissemination globally in an ethical manner featuring journals that facilitate research / professionals to propagate their valuable works. follow us on facebook, twitter. facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sciencelevate/ twitter: https://twitter.com/sciencelevate
How Do I Choose the Best Journal for My Paper?
 
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HOW DO I CHOOSE THE BEST JOURNAL FOR MY PAPER? Which journal is the best one in scholarly publishing for my paper? This video lists the decision points when making this decision. MORE VIDEOS on Choosing Which Journal to Publish Your Article https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3jkGjy26P2tVNragL2ik0c2 FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: How do I decide the best journal for my paper? Hi there, I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am to going to be discussing how to choose a scholarly journal for you to submit your paper to. A bit about me: I’ve been in scholarly publishing for over 25 year and as Chief Content Officer for a major medical publisher oversaw the publishing of over 20,000 peer reviewed articles. So, you have collected your data and information or completed your study. You have written your paper. Now what? Prior to deciding, make sure you have had the paper read and critiqued by your colleagues and associates. Consider very carefully their feedback and make the changes where you see fit. Remember to give it one more very close check for grammar, spelling, format and style before moving on. Now you are ready. In starting to consider where to submit your paper, create a chart or list of the options under consideration. Include the journals you read and receive; and the ones you respect. Ask your co-workers and colleagues what journals best fit the topic of your paper and have them weigh in on their opinions on the publications. In your chart, list these journal names and their urls. Most journal website will have an About section that will list the Mission or Aims and Scope of the publication. Read them and see if they align with your content and article format. Add to the chart the journal’s frequency; that is monthly, bimonthly, quarterly. Closely review the Information for Authors published for each Journal, likely at their website. This is the best guide to see if your article is a fit and will save everyone time. Read it very closely. Not just their mission but also the specifications for format and types of articles that are interested in. Also, if a journal has an Impact Factor, it may be listed at their website. If not, sometimes searching the web for that journal’s current Impact Factor will give you an answer. List whether the journal is subscription based, or sent to members of a Society, or an Open Access publication. Sometimes a journal may be more than one of these. If it is Open Access, check out the APC or Author Processing Charge and include the amount, if any. The more widely the journal is available, for example an Open Access publication, the more your article will get downloaded and read. Next check on where the journal is indexed. For instance, in medicine or nursing, being included in Medline or CINAHL are essential. Check for your area of specialty to see if the journal is covered in your key abstracting and indexing service. Once again, go the website and ensure articles are included online in addition to in the paper version of the journal. Are they posted online at acceptance or only when a print version appears? What may be listed at a website is the average time a paper takes to get from submission to decision and then the time it takes to get from acceptance to being published. If your topic has a sense of urgency to it, this time can be a critical decision. These times may not be publicly available. On occasion, the acceptance rate or rejection rate from the previous year may be listed. This would be a key piece of data as well. Search your topic over at a journal’s website to see if they have published any articles on it over the past two years. Most journals are looking for new or novel takes on existing topics and you might want to see what they have recently published. Finally, submit to just one journal at a time. I know it is tempting to reduce the wait time and send out to many journals or publications, but etiquette (and ethics) demand one at a time only.....
Views: 14901 John Bond
Module 1 - Writing and Publishing a Scientific Paper : Core Components
 
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Module 1/5 : Core Components of a Manuscript . Feel free to visit our website, www.sciencedocs.com
Views: 2164 ScienceDocs Inc
Writing a journal paper
 
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The presentation explores the content of a journal paper regarding its form, structure and content. Presentation related documents can be found under this link: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/0ps4io3q0w5n0up/AADWrNNY2pe0sjWiqqV_qhK-a?dl=0
Views: 15107 Shady Attia
Predatory Publishing: From "Fake Academia" to Real Extortion in Scholarly Publishing
 
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March 22, 2017 Brandon Butler Have you ever received an unsolicited email from a publisher you’ve never heard of inviting you to submit a paper to a journal with a generic-but-believable-sounding name or a conference abroad or at an airport hotel? These publishers may advertise their journals as “open access” and promise to make your work visible to well-known indices; they may claim “impact factors” and editorial board members who are leaders in their field. All that’s required of you is a modest fee—an "author’s processing charge"—and these publishers can deliver the lifeblood of any academic career: a peer-reviewed publication. There’s just one catch: the journals are fake. These journals are labeled "predatory," and they are sometimes associated with the broader open-access movement. This Medical Center Hour tours the strange world of predatory publishing and describes some of its more outrageous excesses. But, as Brandon Butler will argue, the fake journals are just a distraction. The academy today faces more serious challenges as it wrestles with how best to share research and knowledge. How should academia confront the predatory moves of its most well-established publishing partners and take better advantage of open access? A John F. Anderson Memorial Lecture
Introduction to Scholarly Publishing # 02 -- The Journal Publishing Cycle
 
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Learn about the 6 steps in the journal publishing cycle: Organize editorial boards, manage submissions and peer review, typeset and production of articles, publish and dissemination of articles, and archiving.
Views: 2040 Elsevier Journals
How to Get Published: A Panel on Academic Publishing
 
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Are you interested in getting your research published? If so, check out the professional development event that occurred​ on Tuesday, March 22nd from 1:00-2:30pm in Wulling Hall 250. During this event, Dr. Muhammad Khalifa and Dr. Josh Collins discuss how to navigate the publishing process. Read Dr. Joshua Collin's article on publishing as a graduate student ("Writer’s Forum--Writing for Publication While in Graduate School: An Accessible Reality") here: http://53695501-488273507574230084.pr... ​Need that extra push to finish your manuscript? Take Dr. Collin's class this summer! Find out more here: http://olsa-umn.weebly.com/uploads/5/...
CAUGHT! Science Journals Publishing HUNDREDS of FRAUDULENT Articles!
 
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LINK TO A VERIFICATION ARTICLE HERE: http://www.thewire.com/technology/2014/03/more-computer-generated-nonsense-papers-pulled-science-journals/358735/ FIND ALL OUR MATERIAL HERE: http://www.ppsimmons.com JOIN US ON FaceBook! - http://www.facebook.com/ppsimmons JOIN US ON OUR BLOG! http://www.ppsimmons.blogspot.com GET CARL'S #1 BEST SELLING BOOKS HERE! http://www.amazon.com/Carl-Gallups/e/B00821JNHK Hear Carl Gallups (narrator) every Friday - 1330 WEBY AM - Gulf Coast Talk Radio Freedom Friday With Carl Gallups http://www.carlgallups.com LISTEN LIVE ON THE NET or YOUR SMART PHONE! LINKS ======= GET CARL'S #1 BEST SELLING BOOKS HERE! http://www.amazon.com/Carl-Gallups/e/B00821JNHK MORE CARL GALLUPS MINISTRY MATERIAL http://www.carlgallups.com/cgm/ HOW TO BE SAVED http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rP5EuPFEwh0 HOW TO KNOW IF YOU ARE IN A CULT http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L9fTuH16WQQ ASK QUESTIONS OR GET HELP WITH SALVATION - Click the EMAIL LINK http://www.carlgallups.com/ppsimmons/ http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1936488523/ref=as_li_ss_il?ie=UTF8&tag=s0231-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=1936488523#reader_1936488523 http://www.carlgallups.com/magicman THE MAGIC MAN IN THE SKY - WEBSITE http://www.carlgallups.com/rabbi THE RABBI WHO FOUND MESSIAH - WEBSITE http://www.facebook.com/ppsimmons PPSIMMONS FaceBook fan page http://www.youtube.com/ppsimmons PPSIMMONS YouTube channel http://www.carlgallups.com Carl Gallups' website
The Art of Scientific Publishing
 
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Scientific journals have very high rejection rates — 75 percent or greater. The transformation of a manuscript into a published paper is a major challenge. Learn the logistics of publishing in scientific journals and approaches for minimizing perils from expert editor Harold Drake, Chair of the Department of Ecological Microbiology at the University of Bayreuth in Germany and Editor-in-Chief of the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology (AEM). AEM has a broad interdisciplinary profile and is the number one cited journal in microbiology and biotechnology. AEM is published by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) which publishes many journals in various fields of microbiology, including virology, immunology, and clinical microbiology.
5 Tips for Publishing Academic Articles | Grad school | Episode #36
 
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We've all heard the "publish or perish" line but you don't have to fall prey to it. In fact, you can adopt the "publish and publish more" ideology to which I ascribe. If you want to learn some strategies pertaining to publishing then check this vid out. Please subscribe!!!!!! Let's connect: IG: Briana_Whiteside Twitter: Bri_Whiteside FB: Briana Whiteside Site: brianawhiteside.com
Views: 12 Briana Whiteside
Publishing in academic journals tips to have a perfect start
 
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Lyndsey Dixon, journals editorial director for Asia Pacific, Taylor & Francis talks the essential skills on planning and submitting articles to academic journals. It is designed not to teach how to write a paper, but instead to offer advices on choosing the correct journal and understanding journals publishing process and practice. This seminar will cover: Publishing ethics; Choose the right journal; Understand the standard and practice; Peer-review and publishing processes; Unique and persistent researcher identifiers (ORCID iD) Date: November 07, 2017 (Tuesday) Time: 12:30 - 14:00
Views: 129 HKUST Library
How to select academic journals for publishing?
 
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How to Select a Journal for you Research Paper? #Check if your selected journals are listed in: Thomson Reuters http://ip-science.thomsonreuters.com/mjl/ Norwegian Scientific Database https://dbh.nsd.uib.no/publiseringskanaler/Forside Publish or Perish http://www.harzing.com/resources/journal-quality-list #Research #Paper #Publication #Journal #Selection #Academic #Publishing #Elsevier #ResearchHUB
Views: 3921 Research HUB
Publishing in Academic Journals (complete series)
 
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This video covers a number of important issues relating to publishing in academic journals. It is a combination of all 4 parts of a series. It functions as a stand-alone informative video for researchers and research students, as well as a pre-workshop preparation resource for people coming to a workshop with me. The 4 parts can be watched separately and are: Part 1: What is changing (and not changing) in academic journal publishing Part 2: Copyright and Open Access issues Part 3: Journal quality and status indicators Part 4: Peer review
Views: 817 Nick Hopwood
Fall 2015 Academic Presses and Scholarly Publishing
 
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December 11, 2015 Featuring Elizabeth Ault (Duke University Press) and Sara Jo Cohen (Temple University Press) in conversation with Richard Brown (Georgetown University Press) and Peter Ginna (previously with Oxford University Press).