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How to Use Putty with SSH Keys on Windows
 
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In this tutorial, we will demonstrate how to use PuTTY with SSH keys in windows. Don't forget to check out our site http://howtech.tv/ for more free how-to videos! http://youtube.com/ithowtovids - our feed http://www.facebook.com/howtechtv - join us on facebook https://plus.google.com/103440382717658277879 - our group in Google+ In this easy step by step tutorial, you will learn how to use PuTTY as an SSH client in Windows. PuTTY is communication software available freely over the internet, which uses several network protocols including SSH. Logging in using PuTTY SSH keys allows the only those people who have a valid key pair, which further prevents any threat of unwanted hacking of data. Step#1: Configuring PuTTY terminal First of all, open up the PuTTY terminal. Over here, enter the host for the server which you want to connect to. Let's enter an IP address of one of the host here and leave the port to default. Step#2: Authorization With that done, let's move to the SSH option in the category portion, expand it and then click on the "Authorization" option. Here, browse for the Key File which will be automatically made when configuring this connection. Locate the file and then click on the OK button. Step#3: Connecting to SSH Server Once you are done with that, a terminal will open up and will prompt you for the username. Specify the username and hit enter. After that, the connection would be established completely, enabling you to perform any tasks depending upon the permissions set by the administrator. Step#4: Generate SSH Key Now let's see how we can generate the SSH keys. For that, open up the Putty key generator. Over here, click on the Generate button next to the "Generate a public/private Key pair" option, in the Actions section. Step#5: Encrypting and saving SSH Key You can also change the type of parameters according to your requirements, and even change the bits over here. When prompted to generate some randomness, keep moving the cursor over the blank screen over here. This step is basically used by the application for securing the encryption. Random movements can be hard to re-generate and the sequence produced by your movements is calculated by the application. Once the process completes, it will show you the encryption key in the preview area. To save this key, click on the Save Private Key button and it will prompt you with a notification asking you whether you want to create a key without a passphrase. Hit yes to ignore it for now and then specify the location for the file. Your PuTTY SSH key file would be saved with the ".ppk" extension. And that pretty much covers the basics of using PuTTY with SSH keys in windows.
How to Configure SSH on a Cisco Router or Switch
 
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Full explanation on how SSH works can be found here http://www.certbros.com/cisco/how-to-configure-ssh/ This video will guide you through how to configure and enable your Cisco Switch or Router to use SSH (secure socket shell) in 5 easy steps. SSH Vs Telnet SSH and Telnet are used to achieve the same result, to connect to the switch/router remotely however SSH and Telnet couldn't be more different in terms of security. While Telnet is still widely used but it has a BIG security flaw, it transmits all login details in PLAIN TEXT causing a huge security vulnerability and allowing anyone with the know how to pick out the logging information to you Cisco devices! SSH on the overhand is completely secure and should be used over telnet every time. It uses a very clever process that encrypts and decrypts the data that is sent, you can read more on how it is done here http://coplex.co.uk/cisco/how-to-configure-ssh/ SSH does have a few extra steps involved but still only takes a few minutes to set up as this videos shows you. This video uses a Cisco 3550 Switch however the process is the same for switches and routers. If you like the video please like, comment, subscribe Thank you. Do you Even CertBros? Website: http://www.certbros.com Subscribe: https://goo.gl/l999wu BRAND NEW FOURM: http://goo.gl/qLHWhF Twitter: https://twitter.com/certbros
Views: 27232 CertBros
Hashing Passwords | Node Authentication Tutorial – Part 3
 
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🚀Support Chris Courses with Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/chriscourses 🖥Professional Web Development Services from Chris: https://resovere.com/ Learn the basics behind hashing users' passwords and why it is so very important to do this within any password related app. When it comes to securing your users' passwords, it's integral, no, absolutely necessary to hash your users' passwords before storing them in a database. Hashing is the process of scrambling up a user's password into a long string of characters that's undecipherable. The interesting thing about hashing: once you put the password in the hasher, there's no way to convert it back to its original form (at least from a mathematical standpoint). This helps ensure that your users' passwords are unreadable in the off chance someone happens to stumble upon the data in your database. Code along with me as I demonstrate how to implement hashing functionality into our user based node app. bcrypt npm link: https://www.npmjs.com/package/bcrypt Video Git Repo (starts at part 1): ------------------------------------------------ https://github.com/christopher4lis/express-cc Node Authentication Process: ------------------------------------------ // Add our boilerplate // 1.x Git clone express-cc repo // 2.x Run yarn / npm install // Create a new user in the database // 1.x Create a form within a view // 2.x Create route that'll process the form's post request // 3.x Create a database connection using .env file // 4.x Grab form input and insert into database // 5.x Add express-validation package // 6.x Validate user input on backend // 7.x Validate user input on frontend // 8.x Hash our user's password // 9.x Store user in database // Login user (update user session, return auth cookie) // 1. Install passport // 2. Configure passport with local strategy // Protect routes and only permit entry with authorization cookie // Create logout button // Create login page Video Timeline: ----------------------------- 00:50 - Why storing passwords in plain text is bad 01:36 - What is hashing? 02:35 - How to hash our users' passwords 03:05 - What is bcrypt? 06:01 - What is a salt? 07:08 - Testing out our hashing implementation To be continued... The Platform: ------------------------- http://chriscourses.com is a platform in progress whose goal is to educate aspiring and seasoned web developers via story driven learning. Each course tells a different story, and each milestone reveals a different scene. With an expansive universe to explore, you can track your progress, and gain the necessary skills needed to build your dreams. For updates on the progress of chriscourses.com and future videos, join the Chris Courses mailing list at http://chriscourses.com. Chris Courses Social: ----------------------------------- Twitter: https://twitter.com/chriscourses Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/chriscourses Christopher Lis Social: ------------------------------------- Twitter: https://twitter.com/christopher4lis CodePen: http://codepen.io/christopher4lis
Views: 18231 Chris Courses
How to set up Secure Shell (SSH) in Cisco Packet Tracer
 
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How to set up Secure Shell (SSH) in Cisco Packet Tracer What is Secure Shell (SSH) you might ask!? SSH protocol uses public-key cryptography to authenticate the remote computer and allow it to authenticate the user, if necessary. There are several ways to use SSH; one is to use automatically generated public-private key pairs to simply encrypt a network connection, and then use password authentication to log on. Out side of PT, on a real computer you can use the program called putty to SSH in to your interfaces.
Views: 13791 Jordan Taylor
ssh configuration lab ccna cisco packet tracer
 
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Please watch: "IPv6 and Multiuser Lab showing wan connection using cisco packet tracer" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qq9r_A94lh4 -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- SSH CONFIGURATION ON CISCO ROUTER CCNA-LAB To enable secure access to your Cisco Router or Cisco switches, you can use SSH instead of Telnet. SSH uses encryption to secure data from eavesdropping. To enable or configure SSH on cisco devices, the following steps are required: 1. set up a hostname and and a domain name 2. configure local username and password 3. generate RSA public and private keys 4. allow only SSH access 5. apply enable password hostname r1 ip domain-name slashroot.in username satish password tiwary crypto key generate rsa line vty 0 15 login local transport input ssh hence our ssh is configured as you can see in above video.
Views: 239 slashrootdotin
RSA/Cisco AnyConnect Setup
 
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A screencast on how to use the RSA keyfob with the Cisco AnyConnect VPN client.
Python code audit of a firmware update - 34C3 CTF software_update (crypto) part 1/2
 
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This challenge from the 34C3 CTF implemented a software update in python. In part 1/2 we try to understand the code and think about possible attacks. software_update: https://archive.aachen.ccc.de/34c3ctf.ccc.ac/challenges/index.html What is CTF? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ev9ZX9J45A Why you should play CTFs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfjV8XukxO8 -=[ 🔴 Stuff I use ]=- → Microphone:* https://amzn.to/2LW6ldx → Graphics tablet:* https://amzn.to/2C8djYj → Camera#1 for streaming:* https://amzn.to/2SJ66VM → Lens for streaming:* https://amzn.to/2CdG31I → Connect Camera#1 to PC:* https://amzn.to/2VDRhWj → Camera#2 for electronics:* https://amzn.to/2LWxehv → Lens for macro shots:* https://amzn.to/2C5tXrw → Keyboard:* https://amzn.to/2LZgCFD → Headphones:* https://amzn.to/2M2KhxW -=[ ❤️ Support ]=- → per Video: https://www.patreon.com/join/liveoverflow → per Month: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClcE-kVhqyiHCcjYwcpfj9w/join -=[ 🐕 Social ]=- → Twitter: https://twitter.com/LiveOverflow/ → Website: https://liveoverflow.com/ → Subreddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/LiveOverflow/ → Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LiveOverflow/ -=[ 📄 P.S. ]=- All links with "*" are affiliate links. LiveOverflow / Security Flag GmbH is part of the Amazon Affiliate Partner Programm. #Cryptography #CTF
Views: 28100 LiveOverflow
Side Channel Analysis of Cryptographic Implementations
 
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Cryptography and Network Security by Prof. D. Mukhopadhyay, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 5774 nptelhrd
CCNA ITN Practice Skill Final Exam PT
 
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Host 1 IPv4 192.168.1.97 255.255.255.224 GWv4 192.168.1.126 IPv6 2001:DB8:ACAD:A::FF/64 GWv6 FE80::1 Host 2 IPv4 192.168.1.98 255.255.255.224 GWv4 192.168.1.126 IPv6 2001:DB8:ACAD:A::15/64 GWv6 FE80::1 Host 3 IPv4 192.168.1.145 255.255.255.240 GWv4 192.168.1.158 IPv6 2001:DB8:ACAD:B::FF/64 GWv6 FE80::1 TFTP Server IPv4 192.168.1.146 255.255.255.240 GWv4 192.168.1.158 IPv6 2001:DB8:ACAD:B::15/64 GWv6 FE80::1 Building 1 Router connect kan host1 ke router dgn kabel console, pakek port console masuk ke host1, terminal enable configuration terminal hostname Middle enable secret class12345 service password-encryption banner motd @[email protected] security passwords min-length 10 login block-for 120 attempts 2 within 30 no ip domain-lookup ip domain-name cisco.ua crypto key generate rsa !1024 line console 0 password cisco12345 login logging synchronous exec-timeout 60 exit line vty 0 4 password cisco12345 transport input ssh login local logging synchronous exec-timeout 60 exit line aux 0 password cisco12345 login logging synchronous exec-timeout 60 exit ip ssh version 2 ip ssh time-out 120 username netadmin privilege 15 secret Cisco_CCNA5 interface g0/0 ip address 192.168.1.126 255.255.255.224 description First Floor LAN ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:A::1/64 ipv6 address fe80::1 link-local no shutdown exit interface g0/1 ip address 192.168.1.158 255.255.255.240 description Second Floor LAN ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ACAD:B::1/64 ipv6 address fe80::1 link-local no shutdown exit ipv6 unicast-routing exit write copy running-config tftp: !Address or name of remote host []? 192.168.1.146 enter Second Floor Switch connect kan host3 ke switch dgn kabel console, pakek port console masuk ke host3, terminal enable configuration terminal enable secret class12345 service password-encryption banner motd @[email protected] no ip domain-lookup line console 0 password cisco12345 login logging synchronous exec-timeout 60 exit line vty 0 15 password cisco12345 login logging synchronous exec-timeout 60 exit interface vlan 1 ip address 192.168.1.157 255.255.255.240 no shutdown ip default-gateway 192.168.1.158 exit write
Views: 210651 Afifudin Ma'arif
Tutorial: Locating your  Passphrase and Private Keys in Coinomi
 
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I've received a few request about how to complete this process your of locating your passphrase and Private Keys inside of coinomi, here I"ll walk you through the steps. Enjoy BIP39 Mnemonic Code Coverter https://coinomi.com/recovery-phrase-tool.html Looking for a Hardware Wallet this holiday? https://www.cryptohwwallet.com/user/thecoinalley ======================================= Ethconnect - The Ethereum Based Lending Platform https://ethconnect.net/ref/thecoinalley HextraCoin offers one of the best lending Platforms out there https://hextracoin.co/register?referrer=texasguy77 Earn an average rate of 1% Daily, until you've received 140% back on your capital in 140 business days https://coinalley.usi-tech.info/ Use your Bitcoin on Amazon and name your price https://purse.io/?_r=J2cLIo **Tips Cheerfully Accepted** LTC: Lfccxb9keTzYYxPqdXv8DEoiRHR7pAPVJQBTC ETH: wthomas.eth DOGE:DNAa9JEKSkLnh7UqJdzQ3LNZ53J14qa64Q DASH:XnwSigBbbdTszjzPgTAV5W2mZ8N5FJoyG8 =========================================
Views: 8192 The Coin Alley
Cryptography Basics for Embedded Developers by Eystein Stenberg
 
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Cryptography Basics for Embedded Developers - Eystein Stenberg, Mender Many vulnerabilities and breaches happen due to incorrect use of cryptographic mechanisms like encryption. This talk will cover the basic mechanisms of cryptography, like encryption, signatures, and key storage, looking at how these are used to create important security properties like authentication, confidentiality and integrity. Performance is particularly important for embedded development and we will cover which cryptographic operations are computationally expensive and why. We will highlight implementations of cryptographic mechanisms that help meet the performance needs of embedded devices, including Elliptic Curve Cryptography. We will wrap up with common pitfalls, libraries and tools relevant for secure use of cryptography for embedded devices. Eystein Stenberg has over 7 years of experience in security and systems management as a developer, a support engineer, a technical account manager, and now as a product manager. He has been in the front line of some of the largest production environments in various roles and has in-depth knowledge of the challenges in systems security in a real-world context. His holds a Master’s degree in cryptography and his writing credits include “Distributing a Private Key Generator in Ad Hoc Networks."
Multi-Party Computation: From Theory to Practice
 
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Google Tech Talk 1/8/13 Presented by Nigel P. Smart ABSTRACT Multi-Party Computation (MPC) allows, in theory, a set of parties to compute any function on their secret input without revealing anything bar the output of the function. For many years this has been a restricted to a theoretical tool in cryptography. However, in the past five years amazing strides have been made in turning theory into practice. In this talk I will present the latest, practical, protocol called SPDZ (Speedz), which achieves much of its performance advantage from the use of Fully Homomorphic Encryption as a sub-procedure. No prior knowledge of MPC will be assumed. Speaker Info University of Bristol, U.K.
Views: 9193 GoogleTechTalks
ShmooCon 2014: SafeCurves: Choosing Safe Curves for Elliptic-Curve Cryptography
 
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There are several different standards covering selection of curves for use in elliptic-curve cryptography (ECC). Each of these standards tries to ensure that the elliptic-curve discrete-logarithm problem (ECDLP) is difficult. ECDLP is the problem of finding an ECC user's secret key, given the user's public key. Unfortunately, there is a gap between ECDLP difficulty and ECC security. None of these standards do a good job of ensuring ECC security. There are many attacks that break real-world ECC without solving ECDLP. The core problem is that if you implement the standard curves, chances are you're doing it wrong: Your implementation produces incorrect results for some rare curve points. Your implementation leaks secret data when the input isn't a curve point. Your implementation leaks secret data through branch timing. Your implementation leaks secret data through cache timing. These problems are exploitable by real attackers, taking advantage of the gaps between ECDLP and real-world ECC. Secure implementations of the standard curves are theoretically possible but very hard. Most of these attacks would have been ruled out by better choices of curves that allow simple implementations to be secure implementations. This is the primary motivation for SafeCurves, http://safecurves.cr.yp.to/. The SafeCurves criteria are designed to ensure ECC security, not just ECDLP security. We're researchers in both constructive and destructive aspects of elliptic-curve cryptography. We started issuing warnings about the security dangers of the NIST elliptic curves before it became fashionable to do so. We've proposed alternatives that are faster and stronger, including Curve25519, Ed25519, and Curve3617. Curve25519 is now the go-to alternative curve for people wanting speed and implementation security; it's also not tainted by NIST/NSA. In 2007 we pointed out that Edwards curves are faster and easier to implement securely than standard Weierstrass curves. Edwards curves are also mathematically simpler, allowing a much friendlier introduction to ECC. We've done some other things in crypto as well.
Views: 861 HackersOnBoard
How you can get your public key from the Coinbase platform
 
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It's very easy. You can get it directly from the online wallet you work with to buy cryptocurrency. Although each platform is different, most of them are quite intuitive and they will give you your public code very easily. That's the way you have to receive cryptocurrency from anyone, and also the code you need to have if you want to transfer cryptocurrencies to someone.
Defeat 2FA token because of bad randomness - rhme2 Twistword (Misc 400)
 
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Generating random numbers on computers is not easy. And while the intended solution was really hard, the challenge had a problem with the random number generation, which allowed me to solve it. Clarification from Andres Moreno (riscure) on the challenge: "The "official" challenge solution involved reading the tiny Mersenne twister (tinyMT) paper, writing some equations, and using a solver. The tinyMT is tricky to initialize. Giving a proper seed is not enough. You need to provide initial state matrices with certain properties (there is a generator for this). The challenge used improper initialized matrices (zeros) that reduced the PRNG period. During tests, we found that ~12hr were needed to solve the challenge (solver time only), but we did not test the amount of entropy reduction by improper state initialization. Fortunately, the problem was not in the PRNG." -=[ 🔴 Stuff I use ]=- → Microphone:* https://amzn.to/2LW6ldx → Graphics tablet:* https://amzn.to/2C8djYj → Camera#1 for streaming:* https://amzn.to/2SJ66VM → Lens for streaming:* https://amzn.to/2CdG31I → Connect Camera#1 to PC:* https://amzn.to/2VDRhWj → Camera#2 for electronics:* https://amzn.to/2LWxehv → Lens for macro shots:* https://amzn.to/2C5tXrw → Keyboard:* https://amzn.to/2LZgCFD → Headphones:* https://amzn.to/2M2KhxW -=[ ❤️ Support ]=- → per Video: https://www.patreon.com/join/liveoverflow → per Month: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClcE-kVhqyiHCcjYwcpfj9w/join -=[ 🐕 Social ]=- → Twitter: https://twitter.com/LiveOverflow/ → Website: https://liveoverflow.com/ → Subreddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/LiveOverflow/ → Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LiveOverflow/ -=[ 📄 P.S. ]=- All links with "*" are affiliate links. LiveOverflow / Security Flag GmbH is part of the Amazon Affiliate Partner Programm. #CTF #Cryptography
Views: 17888 LiveOverflow
How To Export & Import Private Keys (Litecoin/Bitcoin)
 
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There are a number of reason one would want to Export a private key, here's how. 👓 Command Lines (Core Wallets): - Walletpassphrase [yourpassphrase] 60 - Importprivkey [yourkey] - dumpprivkey [youraddress] Additional note: 60 refers to the time/s of how long the wallet will remain unlocked. You can change 60 to any number 🎧 Music: ♪ The Messenger - Silent Partner ♪ Virtual Riot - Paper Planes
Views: 39355 LitecoinDotCom
How to create, list, or destroy virtual smart cards on Windows
 
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Recommended: turn on CC (closed captioning) in this video! If your computer has a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip, and if it is enabled in the BIOS, then you can leverage some of the benefits of smart card security by creating a PIN-protected virtual smart card, which lives on the TPM in a protected memory space, similar to an expensive Hardware Security Module (HSM). You can use your enabled TPM to securely store a virtual smart card which can safely contain sensitive information, such as private keys from an RSA key pair. This video explains how to create, list, or destroy a virtual smart card (VSC) on Windows 10. IMPORTANT: Administrator privileges are required. Note #1: The "Admin Key" must be a 48-character hex-encoded value. Do NOT copy the admin key in this video; there's nothing magic or special about it. Just do a Google search for "convert plain text to hex". Type in any 24-character string of your choice in plain text, convert those 24-characters from plain text into hex, and then remove any spaces in the converted text. You should now have 48 characters of hexidecimal text, which you can use for the admin key. Note #2: The PIN Unlock Key (PUK) is useful whenever the virtual smart card is locked due to a user inputting an incorrect PIN too many times. If there is a lock, it is temporary, but you can input the PUK at that time to release the lock. Note #3: One practical application of this technology is to enable SSH to connect to a server. The public key would need to be already on the server in the "authorized_keys" file. The private key, in this case, would be safely protected in the TPM and unavailable for reading or copying or brute-forcing. The way you can access the private key in order to SSH to the server is to use software that leverages the Windows crypto API. Instead of using a program like PuTTY (which requires the path to a private key on the hard drive), use a patched version of PuTTY known as PuTTYWinCrypt (which can use Windows crypto APIs to access the private key on a specified virtual smart card). Below is the text that is used in the video. Replace the placeholder X's with your own values: ================================ NAME OF VIRTUAL SMART CARD: XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX PIN: XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX ADMIN KEY (must be a 48-character hex-encoded value): XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX PUK: XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX COMMAND TO CREATE A VSC (using name of the virtual smart card above): tpmvscmgr.exe create /name "XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX" /pin PROMPT /pinpolicy minlen 10 uppercase REQUIRED lowercase REQUIRED digits REQUIRED specialchars REQUIRED /AdminKey PROMPT /puk PROMPT /attestation AIK_AND_CERT /generate LIST ALL VSC's: wmic path win32_PnPEntity where "DeviceID like '%smartcardreader%'" get DeviceID,Name,Status COMMAND TO DESTROY A VSC (using a specific DeviceID): Tpmvscmgr destroy /instance "XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX" ================================
Views: 891 Jason McNeill
Cisco ASA Site-to-Site VPN Configuration (Command Line):  Cisco ASA Training 101
 
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http://www.soundtraining.net Author, speaker, and IT trainer Don R. Crawley demonstrates how to configure a site-to-site VPN between two Cisco ASA security appliances. The demo is based on software version 8.3(1) and uses IPSec, ISAKMP, tunnel-groups, Diffie-Hellman groups, and an access-list. The demo is based on the popular book "The Accidental Administrator: Cisco ASA Security Appliance: Step-by-Step Configuration Guide (http://amzn.com/1449596622) and includes a link where you can download a free copy of the configs and the network diagram.
Views: 215081 soundtraining.net
Free Cryptocurrency Course: Learn Everything You Need to Know About Cryptocurrencies Today!
 
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Want more? Enroll in the full course at: https://www.udemy.com/the-complete-cryptocurrency-course-more-than-5-courses-in-1/?couponCode=WB73018CCC Here are more details on the full 24 hour version of this Comprehensive COMPLETE Cryptocurrency Course! I guarantee that this is THE most thorough cryptocurrency course available ANYWHERE on the market - or your money back (30 day money back guarantee). This course and the many exercises in this course are for beginner or advanced users in any country! By an Award Winning MBA professor who is a top selling online business teacher, top selling author, former Goldman Sachs employee, Columbia MBA (finance major) and venture capitalist who has invested in and sat on the boards of cryptocurrency companies since 2013 and a hedge fund industry veteran and founder. He is also the author of the #1 best selling business course on Udemy. THIS COMPLETE CRYPTOCURRENCY COURSE is 5+ courses in 1! Cryptocurrency Investing Cryptocurrency Mining Cryptocurrency Wallets Cryptocurrency Exchanges Blockchain Creating a Diversified Portfolio & Much More! Also included in this course is a very comprehensive Excel spreadsheet that contains more than 30 Cryptocurrency exercises to help you learn everything you need to know about cryptocurrencies (whether you are a beginner or an advanced user). No prior cryptocurrency or finance or accounting or tech or Excel experience is required to take this course. We Will Cover More than 10 Cryptocurrencies in this Course (and how to buy & sell each one, what are the pros and cons of each one & how to mine each one): Bitcoin Ethereum Ripple Litecoin Monero Zcash Dash NEO Cardano Stellar ...and more (this course will constantly be updated with more cryptocurrencies) We Will Cover More than 5 Wallets in this Course (how to set one up, the pros & cons of all 5 wallet types and how to transfer money between them): QR Code Wallets Four USB Wallets (Trezor. Ledger Nano S, DigitalBitBox & KeepKey) Coinbase Electrum Blockchain ...and more (this course will constantly be updated with more wallets) We Will Cover the More than 5 Exchanges in this Course (how to transact with each one): GDAX Poloniex Kraken Bittrex Gemini Binance ...& more (this course will constantly be updated with more exchanges) Here Are Some More Topics That We Will Cover In This Course: The Future of Money & What is Blockchain? Introduction to 10+ Cryptocurrencies (Mining, Investing & Much More) Create an Investment Portfolio of Cryptocurrencies Understand What Makes a Great Cryptocurrency as A Great Long-Term Investment Introduction to 5+ Wallets to Use to Store Your Cryptocurrencies Introduction to 5+ Exchanges to Use to Buy or Sell Cryptocurrencies Introduction to Mining & Building a Mining PC from Scratch! Cryptocurrency Investment Framework (made in Excel) Watching out for Scams & Managing Risk What Are the Biggest Mistakes New Investors Make in Cryptocurrencies? How to Identify the Next Great Cryptocurrency (What to Look For & Watch Out For) When Should You Buy or Sell a Cryptocurrency? How Do You Read Charts & Look for Buy or Sell Signals What Makes a Great Wallet (What to Look For From Researching a Wallet) Introduction to ICOs + What Makes a Great ICO (What To Look For From Researching An ICO More than 100 Great Online Cryptocurrency Resources You can use the comprehensive Excel exercise document in this course on a Mac or on a PC (I recommend having Excel version 2013 or later in order to complete all of the cryptocurrency exercises in this course). This course and the included comprehensive Complete Cryptocurrency Excel dashboard exercise file is a roadmap for your personal & technical/finance cryptocurrency success. All of the tools you need to be successful with cryptocurrencies are included in this course & the entire course is based on real life Practical Knowledge and experience & not based on theory. Please click the take this course button so you can take your cryptocurrency skills to the next level. Requirements: No prior technology or cryptocurrency or finance or accounting or Excel experience is required to take this course. Please note that Excel 2013 (or a newer version) is recommended in order to complete some of the exercises in this course. The Excel exercises in this course work on the Windows and Mac versions of Excel. Who is the target audience? Anyone in ANY country interested in learning EVERYTHING about cryptocurrency can take this course as this 23+ hour COMPLETE course is 5+ courses in 1 (1: Investing, 2: Mining, 3: Wallets, 4: Blockchain , 5: Transacting, 6: Creating a Diversified Portfolio & Much More!) *** Again, I guarantee that this is THE most thorough cryptocurrency course available ANYWHERE on the market - or your money back (30 day money back guarantee). *** Enroll in the full course at: https://www.udemy.com/the-complete-cryptocurrency-course-more-than-5-courses-in-1/?couponCode=WB73018CCC Thanks, Chris Haroun
C# encrypting and decrypting using AES CBC, safe storing the encrypted data
 
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In this tutorial i'm going to show you how to encrypt, decrypt data using AES(Advanced Encryption Standard), and storing the encrypted data in safe place. Source code: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxW01l6w6JYfd1pTZVBjaWxhWEU/view?usp=sharing
Views: 56878 Dawisko1
Crypto Defenses for Real-World System Threats - Kenn White - Ann Arbor
 
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Modern encryption techniques provide several important security properties, well known to most practitioners. Or are they? What are in fact the guarantees of, say, HTTPS TLS cipher suites using authenticated encryption, IPSec vs. SSL VPNs, Property Preserving Encryption, or token vaults? We live in an era of embedded Hardware Security Modules that cost less than $1 in volume, and countless options now exist for encrypting streaming network data, files, volumes, and even entire databases. Let's take a deep dive into the edge of developed practice to discuss real-world threat scenarios to public cloud and IoT data, and look closely at how we can address specific technical risks with our current encryption toolkits. Advanced math not required. Bio: Kenneth White is a security researcher whose work focuses on networks and global systems. He is co-director of the Open Crypto Audit Project (OCAP), currently managing a large-scale audit of OpenSSL on behalf of the Linux Foundation's Core Infrastructure Initiative. Previously, White was Principal Scientist at Washington DC-based Social & Scientific Systems where he led the engineering team that designed and ran global operations and security for the largest clinical trial network in the world, with research centers in over 100 countries. White co-founded CBX Group which provides security services to major organizations including World Health, UNICEF, Doctors without Borders, the US State Department, and BAO Systems. Together with Matthew Green, White co-founded the TrueCrypt audit project, a community-driven initiative to conduct the first comprehensive cryptanalysis and public security audit of the widely used TrueCrypt encryption software. White holds a Masters from Harvard and is a PhD candidate in neuroscience and cognitive science, with applied research in real-time classification and machine learning. His work on network security and forensics and been cited by media including the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Reuters, Wired and Nature. White is a technical reviewer for the Software Engineering Institute, and publishes and speaks frequently on computational modeling, security engineering, and trust. He tweets @kennwhite.
Views: 853 Duo Security
DEF CON 21 - Joe Grand - JTAGulator Assisted Discovery Of On Chip Debug
 
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JTAGulator: Assisted Discovery Of On-Chip Debug Interfaces JOE GRAND AKA KINGPIN On-chip debug (OCD) interfaces can provide chip-level control of a target device and are a primary vector used by hackers to extract program code or data, modify memory contents, or affect device operation on-the-fly. Depending on the complexity of the target device, manually locating available OCD connections can be a difficult and time consuming task, sometimes requiring physical destruction or modification of the device. In this session, Joe will introduce the JTAGulator, an open source hardware tool that assists in identifying OCD connections from test points, vias, or components pads. He will discuss traditional hardware reverse engineering methods and prior art in this field, how OCD interfaces work, and how JTAGulator can simplify the task of discovering such interfaces. Joe Grand (@joegrand) is an electrical engineer and hardware hacker. He runs Grand Idea Studio (www.grandideastudio.com) and specializes in the design of consumer and hobbyist embedded systems. He created the electronic badges for DEFCON 14 through 18 and was a co-host of Discovery Channel's Prototype This. Back in the day when he was known as Kingpin, he was a member of the infamous hacker group L0pht Heavy Industries. Materials: https://www.defcon.org/images/defcon-21/dc-21-presentations/Grand/DEFCON-21-Grand-JTAGulator.pdf https://www.defcon.org/images/defcon-21/dc-21-presentations/Grand/Extras.zip
Views: 2961 DEFCONConference
Theory and Practice of Cryptography
 
01:32:08
Google Tech Talks December, 19 2007 Topics include: Introduction to Modern Cryptography, Using Cryptography in Practice and at Google, Proofs of Security and Security Definitions and A Special Topic in Cryptography This talk is one in a series hosted by Google University: Wednesdays, 11/28/07 - 12/19/07 from 1-2pm Speaker: Steve Weis Steve Weis received his PhD from the Cryptography and Information Security group at MIT, where he was advised by Ron Rivest. He is a member of Google's Applied Security (AppSec) team and is the technical lead for Google's internal cryptographic library, KeyMaster.
Views: 70050 GoogleTechTalks
Stream Ciphers
 
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Cryptography and Network Security by Prof. D. Mukhopadhyay, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 7112 nptelhrd
AskDeveloper Podcast - 46 - Cryptography - Part 1 - Introduction and Hashing - التشفير الجزء الأول
 
01:40:46
http://www.askdeveloper.com/2017/01/cryptography.html Information Security 1. Introduction ○ Security by obscurity § Steganography □ Hiding data inside another form of data, like using non-used bits in image to hide a message § Cool, but not practical. § Disadvantages ◊ Algorithm secrecy vs. key secrecy ○ Cryptography is everywhere and yet if done right, you can barely see it. ○ Goals: § Confidentiality □ Secrets stay secret. § Integrity □ Data is not tampered with. § Non-Repudiation □ No party can deny sending messages. § Authentication □ Each party can ensure that the sender is what they expect. ○ Cryptography § Hashing § Encryption § Signing § Protocols ○ Random Number Generators § Extremely important, almost all encryption/hashing strength is affected by how random the random number generator is. § Don't use simple random number, use a cryptographic random number generator with a sophisticated source of entropy. § Pseudorandom number generator § Dual_EC_DRBG random generator backdoor 2. Body ○ Hashing (one Way) § Properties □ Fixed length output no matter what size the input was □ Very easy to compute the hash of a given message, however very hard to compute from a hash the corresponding input. □ Mathematically infeasible to generate a message that has a given hash □ Any modification to a message produces a completely different hash that has no relationship to the original message's hash. □ It is mathematically infeasible to find two messages with the same hash. Hash Collision § Hashing Functions □ Provides data integrity, however lacks authentication □ Examples ® MD5 ◊ Considered Insecure ® Secure Hash Family SHA-X, Sha-1, Sha-2 [Sha256, Sha512], Sha-3 ◊ Sha-1 is considered insecure. ◊ Sha-1, Sha-2 designed by NSA ◊ Sha-3 is not designed by NSA, Competition winner. □ Attacks ® Brute force ◊ CPU's are getting faster and cheaper every day. ◊ GPU's are getting faster and cheaper every day. ◊ Special Hash calculating hardware is becoming more available especially with the BitCoin push. ® Rainbow table attacks ◊ Pre-Calculated tables where you can reverse lookup a hash to a value ◊ Try www.crackstation.net § Hash Message Authentication Codes (HMAC) □ Adds authentication to integrity □ Can be used with all previous algorithms, HMACMD5, HMACShA1, HMAC256 … etc. § Salted Hash □ Adds random salt to mitigate rainbow table □ Salts are unique per record, and not a secret. § Password Based Key Derivation Function (PBKDF2) □ RSA Public Key Cryptographic Standard PKCS #5 Version 2.0 □ Internet Engineering Task Force RFC 2898 Specification ® Adds a lot of iterations to slow it just enough to mitigate brute force (default 50,000 iterations) ® Adds random salt to mitigate rainbow table □ Disadvantage: It can be easily implemented with hardware which makes it vulnerable to bruteforce even with high number of iterations § Bcrypt □ Password Hashing function □ State of the art password hashing § Usages □ Integrity Check Password Storage Our facebook Page http://facebook.com/askdeveloper On Sound Cloud http://soundcloud.com/askdeveloper Please Like & Subscribe
Views: 2255 Mohamed Elsherif
Ciphers in Java,symmetric encryption example with padding,initaivector,modes ECB,CBC
 
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Ciphers in Java five confidentiality modes of operation for symmetric key block cipher algorithms The Electronic Codebook Mode (ECB) The Cipher Block Chaining Mode (CBC) The Cipher Feedback Mode (CFB) The Output Feedback Mode (OFB) The Counter Mode (CT) Symmetric encryption example with padding and CBC using DES Basic symmetric encryption example with padding using the KeyGenerator
Views: 5354 Zariga Tongy
Secure Hash Algorithm
 
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This video is part of the Udacity course "Intro to Information Security". Watch the full course at https://www.udacity.com/course/ud459
Views: 26851 Udacity
Caesar Cipher
 
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This tutorial will teach you how to encrypt and decrypt messages using the Caesar Cipher.-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your own animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 133663 Lacey Wright
What is CRYPTOGRAPHIC NONCE? What does CRYPTOGRAPHIC NONCE mean? CRYPTOGRAPHIC NONCE meaning
 
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What is CRYPTOGRAPHIC NONCE? What does CRYPTOGRAPHIC NONCE mean? CRYPTOGRAPHIC NONCE meaning - CRYPTOGRAPHIC NONCE definition - CRYPTOGRAPHIC NONCE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ In cryptography, a nonce is an arbitrary number that may only be used once. It is similar in spirit to a nonce word, hence the name. It is often a random or pseudo-random number issued in an authentication protocol to ensure that old communications cannot be reused in replay attacks. They can also be useful as initialization vectors and in cryptographic hash function. A nonce is an arbitrary number used only once in a cryptographic communication, in the spirit of a nonce word. They are often random or pseudo-random numbers. Many nonces also include a timestamp to ensure exact timeliness, though this requires clock synchronization between organizations. The addition of a client nonce ("cnonce") helps to improve the security in some ways as implemented in digest access authentication. To ensure that a nonce is used only once, it should be time-variant (including a suitably fine-grained timestamp in its value), or generated with enough random bits to ensure a probabilistically insignificant chance of repeating a previously generated value. Some authors define pseudo-randomness (or unpredictability) as a requirement for a nonce. Authentication protocols may use nonces to ensure that old communications cannot be reused in replay attacks. For instance, nonces are used in HTTP digest access authentication to calculate an MD5 digest of the password. The nonces are different each time the 401 authentication challenge response code is presented, thus making replay attacks virtually impossible. The scenario of ordering products over the Internet can provide an example of the usefulness of nonces in replay attacks. An attacker could take the encrypted information and—without needing to decrypt—could continue to send a particular order to the supplier, thereby ordering products over and over again under the same name and purchase information. The nonce is used to give 'originality' to a given message so that if the company receives any other orders from the same person with the same nonce, it will discard those as invalid orders. A nonce may be used to ensure security for a stream cipher. Where the same key is used for more than one message and then a different nonce is used to ensure that the keystream is different for different messages encrypted with that key; often the message number is used. Secret nonce values are used by the Lamport signature scheme as a signer-side secret which can be selectively revealed for comparison to public hashes for signature creation and verification. Initialization vectors may be referred to as nonces, as they are typically random or pseudo-random. Nonces are used in proof-of-work systems to vary the input to a cryptographic hash function so as to obtain a hash for a certain input that fulfills certain arbitrary conditions. In doing so, it becomes far more difficult to create a "desirable" hash than to verify it, shifting the burden of work onto one side of a transaction or system. For example, proof of work, using hash functions, was considered as a means to combat email spam by forcing email senders to find a hash value for the email (which included a timestamp to prevent pre-computation of useful hashes for later use) that had an arbitrary number of leading zeroes, by hashing the same input with a large number of nonce values until a "desirable" hash was obtained. Similarly, the bitcoin block-chain hashing algorithm can be tuned to an arbitrary difficulty by changing the required minimum/maximum value of the hash so that the number of bitcoins awarded for new blocks does not increase linearly with increased network computation power as new users join. This is likewise achieved by forcing bitcoin miners to add nonce values to the value being hashed to change the hash algorithm output. Because cryptographic hash algorithms cannot easily be predicted based on their inputs, this makes the act of blockchain hashing and the possibility of being awarded bitcoins something of a lottery, where the first "miner" to find a nonce that delivers a desirable hash is awarded valuable bitcoins.
Views: 5623 The Audiopedia
Trusted Computing | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trusted_Computing 00:02:24 1 Key concepts 00:03:08 1.1 Endorsement key 00:04:41 1.2 Memory curtaining 00:05:18 1.3 Sealed storage 00:07:01 1.4 Remote attestation 00:09:25 1.5 Trusted third party 00:16:54 2 Known applications 00:17:19 3 Possible applications 00:17:30 3.1 Digital rights management 00:19:23 3.2 Preventing cheating in online games 00:19:59 3.3 Verification of remote computation for grid computing 00:20:42 4 Criticism 00:25:58 4.1 Digital rights management 00:27:19 4.2 Users unable to modify software 00:28:35 4.3 Users unable to exercise legal rights 00:29:33 4.4 Users vulnerable to vendor withdrawal of service 00:30:43 4.5 Users unable to override 00:32:41 4.6 Loss of anonymity 00:37:30 4.7 TCG specification interoperability problems 00:38:28 4.8 Shutting out of competing products 00:39:54 4.9 Trust 00:42:01 5 Hardware and software support Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7684059199677259 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Trusted Computing (TC) is a technology developed and promoted by the Trusted Computing Group. The term is taken from the field of trusted systems and has a specialized meaning. With Trusted Computing, the computer will consistently behave in expected ways, and those behaviors will be enforced by computer hardware and software. Enforcing this behavior is achieved by loading the hardware with a unique encryption key inaccessible to the rest of the system. TC is controversial as the hardware is not only secured for its owner, but also secured against its owner. Such controversy has led opponents of trusted computing, such as free software activist Richard Stallman, to refer to it instead as treacherous computing, even to the point where some scholarly articles have begun to place scare quotes around "trusted computing".Trusted Computing proponents such as International Data Corporation, the Enterprise Strategy Group and Endpoint Technologies Associates claim the technology will make computers safer, less prone to viruses and malware, and thus more reliable from an end-user perspective. They also claim that Trusted Computing will allow computers and servers to offer improved computer security over that which is currently available. Opponents often claim this technology will be used primarily to enforce digital rights management policies and not to increase computer security.Chip manufacturers Intel and AMD, hardware manufacturers such as HP and Dell, and operating system providers such as Microsoft include Trusted Computing in their products if enabled. The U.S. Army requires that every new PC it purchases comes with a Trusted Platform Module (TPM). As of July 3, 2007, so does virtually the entire United States Department of Defense.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Theory and Practice of Cryptography
 
54:06
Google Tech Talks November, 28 2007 Topics include: Introduction to Modern Cryptography, Using Cryptography in Practice and at Google, Proofs of Security and Security Definitions and A Special Topic in Cryptography This talk is one in a series hosted by Google University: Wednesdays, 11/28/07 - 12/19/07 from 1-2pm Speaker: Steve Weis Steve Weis received his PhD from the Cryptography and Information Security group at MIT, where he was advised by Ron Rivest. He is a member of Google's Applied Security (AppSec) team and is the technical lead for Google's internal cryptographic library, KeyMaster.
Views: 112213 GoogleTechTalks
RSA (cryptosystem)
 
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RSA is one of the first practicable public-key cryptosystems and is widely used for secure data transmission. In such a cryptosystem, the encryption key is public and differs from the decryption key which is kept secret. In RSA, this asymmetry is based on the practical difficulty of factoring the product of two large prime numbers, the factoring problem. RSA stands for Ron Rivest, Adi Shamir and Leonard Adleman, who first publicly described the algorithm in 1977. Clifford Cocks, an English mathematician, had developed an equivalent system in 1973, but it wasn't declassified until 1997. A user of RSA creates and then publishes a public key based on the two large prime numbers, along with an auxiliary value. The prime numbers must be kept secret. Anyone can use the public key to encrypt a message, but with currently published methods, if the public key is large enough, only someone with knowledge of the prime factors can feasibly decode the message. Breaking RSA encryption is known as the RSA problem. It is an open question whether it is as hard as the factoring problem. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 476 Audiopedia
DEF CON 22 - Don't DDoS Me Bro - Practical DDoS Defense
 
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DEF CON 22 Hacking Conference Presentation By Blake Self & Shawn (cisc0ninja) Burrell Don't DDoS Me Bro - Practical DDoS Defense
Views: 57 SecurityRelated
Confidential Computing
 
01:50:39
Confidential computing allows users to upload encrypted code and data to the cloud and get encrypted results back with guaranteed privacy. Confidential computing means cloud providers can’t see customers’ secrets even if cloud administrators are malicious or hackers have exploited kernel bugs in hosts. This session discusses research on confidential computing, including secure hardware containers, operating systems, compilers for secure code generation, cryptography, and redesigning cloud services. See more at https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/video/confidential-computing/
Views: 1066 Microsoft Research
Quantum computing | Wikipedia audio article
 
50:28
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Quantum computing 00:02:24 1 Basics 00:05:05 2 Principles of operation 00:14:37 3 Operation 00:17:17 4 Potential 00:17:26 4.1 Cryptography 00:19:50 4.2 Quantum search 00:22:11 4.3 Quantum simulation 00:22:43 4.4 Quantum annealing and adiabatic optimisation 00:23:19 4.5 Solving linear equations 00:23:42 4.6 Quantum supremacy 00:25:15 5 Obstacles 00:25:57 5.1 Quantum decoherence 00:28:51 6 Developments 00:29:00 6.1 Quantum computing models 00:30:08 6.2 Physical realizations 00:32:48 6.3 Timeline 00:47:01 7 Relation to computational complexity theory Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Quantum computing is computing using quantum-mechanical phenomena, such as superposition and entanglement. A quantum computer is a device that performs quantum computing. Such a computer is different from binary digital electronic computers based on transistors. Whereas common digital computing requires that the data be encoded into binary digits (bits), each of which is always in one of two definite states (0 or 1), quantum computation uses quantum bits or qubits, which can be in superpositions of states. A quantum Turing machine is a theoretical model of such a computer and is also known as the universal quantum computer. The field of quantum computing was initiated by the work of Paul Benioff and Yuri Manin in 1980, Richard Feynman in 1982, and David Deutsch in 1985.As of 2018, the development of actual quantum computers is still in its infancy, but experiments have been carried out in which quantum computational operations were executed on a very small number of quantum bits. Both practical and theoretical research continues, and many national governments and military agencies are funding quantum computing research in additional effort to develop quantum computers for civilian, business, trade, environmental and national security purposes, such as cryptanalysis. Noisy devices with a small number of qubits have been developed by a number of companies, including IBM, Intel, and Google. IBM has made 5-qubit and 16-qubit quantum computing devices available to the public for experiments via the cloud on the IBM Q Experience. D-Wave Systems has been developing their own version of a quantum computer that uses annealing.Large-scale quantum computers would theoretically be able to solve certain problems much more quickly than any classical computers that use even the best currently known algorithms, like integer factorization using Shor's algorithm (which is a quantum algorithm) and the simulation of quantum many-body systems. There exist quantum algorithms, such as Simon's algorithm, that run faster than any possible probabilistic classical algorithm. A classical computer could in principle (with exponential resources) simulate a quantum algorithm, as quantum computation does not violate the Church–Turing thesis. On the other hand, quantum computers may be able to efficiently solve problems which are not practically feasible on classical computers.
Views: 15 wikipedia tts

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