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Solidarity and Security of Gas Supply – FSR online debate
 
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28 September 2017 http://fsr.eui.eu/event/solidarity-security-gas-supply-fsr-online-debate/ Moderator: Ilaria Conti, Head of FSR Gas Speakers: Andris Piebalgs, former Energy Commissioner and Senior Fellow at FSR Walter Boltz, former Vice-Chair of the ACER Board of Regulators and Vice-President of the Council of European Energy Regulators (CEER) Hendrik Pollex, ENTSOG Business Area Manager On 12th September, the European Parliament voted in the plenary the revised Security of Gas Supply Regulation. The aim of the new regulation is to prevent potential gas supply crises and, for the first time, it applies the solidarity principle. It means that in the event of a serious gas crisis, neighbouring Member States will be obliged to help their neighbours out to ensure gas supply to protected consumers – households and essential social services. There are more novelties, as the new legislation strengthens regional cooperation and transparency, as natural gas utilities will be obliged to notify long-term contracts that are relevant for EU security of supply. During the event, the experts discussed in detail the main changes proposed by the revised Security of Gas Supply Regulation and their potential impact on energy security in the EU. They also tried to address the fundamental question –in case of emergency, (how
4th Vienna Forum on European Energy Law | Session 2: Security of Gas Supply
 
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http://fsr.eui.eu/event/european-energy-law-forum-2016/ The second session will examine the security of gas supply, particularly the move toward a pan-European security of supply regime, pipelines, and designing LNG contracts. Towards a Pan-European Security of Supply Regime by Oliver Koch (DG Energy) Pipelines: Between Economics, Law and Diplomacy by Reinhard Mitschek (OMV) How to Design LNG Contracts by Andrius Simkus (Energy Community Secretariat)
The Value of Energy Storage in Supporting EU’s Security of Supply and Decarbonisation Goals
 
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On the margins of the FSR – Gas Infrastructure Europe (GIE) joint workshop held on the 6th of July 2018 in Florence, Andris Piebalgs (FSR) and Lubor Veleba (GIE) discuss the value of storage in supporting the long-term EU’s climate and energy objectives. For decades, the gas storage played a significant role in the EU energy system not only as a source of seasonal flexibility, but also by providing security of supply and system value. However, the role of natural gas and gas storage will be challenged in deeply decarbonized scenarios. Lubor Veleba shares his ideas for the long-term decarbonized future with the renewable gas substituting the natural gas, and explains why the regulatory changes may be needed to support it. For more information visit the event webpage: http://fsr.eui.eu/event/the-value-of-energy-storage-in-supporting-eus-security-of-supply-and-decarbonisation-goal/
Energy supply and security [Policy Podcast]
 
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Energy policy is a competence shared between the EU and its Member States. Whereas the EU has a responsibility under the Treaties to ensure security of supply, Member States are responsible for determining the structure of their energy supply and their choice of energy sources. EU legislation on security of supply focuses on natural gas and electricity markets, and is closely related to other EU objectives: consolidating a single energy market, improving energy efficiency, and promoting renewable energy sources to decarbonise the economy and meet the Paris Agreement goals. The current legislature has seen several initiatives on security of supply. The EU institutions reached agreement on a revised regulation on security of gas supply, a revised decision on intergovernmental agreements in the energy field, and new targets for energy efficiency and renewables by 2030. Parliament has adopted several own-initiative resolutions in the energy field, including one on the new EU strategy on liquefied natural gas and gas storage, which is key to gas supply security. EU projects of common interest finance energy infrastructure that improves interconnection and supports security of supply. Negotiations between the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission (trilogue) are ongoing on a proposal to revise the regulation on security of electricity supply, as part of the clean energy package. There is growing expectation among EU citizens that the EU will intensify its involvement in energy supply and security. If this view was shared by just over half of Europeans in 2016 (52 %), it is now expressed by roughly two thirds of EU citizens (65 %). The EU will retain a key role in monitoring security of supply throughout the energy transition from a historic system of centralised generation dominated by fossil fuels in national markets, towards a new system characterised by a high share of renewables, more localised production and cross-border markets. However, the EU would need to use a special legislative procedure to intervene directly in determining the energy supply of its Member States, requiring unanimity in Council. Subscribe to EPRS Policy Podcasts: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/rss/en/audio-podcasts.html See the paper publication behind this podcast: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/BRIE/2018/630275/EPRS_BRI(2018)630275_EN.pdf
Digital signature on Security of Gas Supply
 
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Antonio TAJANI, President of the European Parliament, and Matti MAASIKAS, Deputy Minister for EU Affairs of Estonia, digitally sign the updated Security of Gas Supply Regulation, on 25 October 2017, in Strasbourg.
Views: 198 Council of the EU
Europe’s electricity market: Ensuring supply security in the transition to renewables
 
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The on-going transformation of the EU power industry is leading policymakers to re-evaluate the current design of electricity markets. Electricity generated from renewable sources has become one of the most important sources of electricity, paving the way for a transition towards a low-carbon energy system. The structure of the electricity market will have to adapt to these changes. This means developing new business models and a new regulatory framework which provides a truly European dimension to security of electricity supply while respecting national specificities. With the new regulatory design for the EU electricity market taking shape, there are concerns in the sector regarding the new rules under discussion in the on-going “trilogue” talks between EU institutions. In particular, negotiators will have to find a compromise on the tools Member States can use in order to ensure security of supply during this transition, such as capacity mechanisms. EURACTIV organised this event to discuss capacity markets and their role in securing electricity supply in the EU. Questions included: - What place for capacity mechanisms in the new market design? - Why capacity mechanisms? Who do they benefit? - What is best practice for designing capacity mechanisms? - Who determines a sufficient level of security of supply and with which tools? - How should the new electricity market be designed in order to facilitate the energy transition?
Views: 256 EURACTIV
Financial supervision - Security of gas supply - E-commerce - Biocides
 
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Parliament's second September session saw MEPs debating the security of gas supply, electronic trade and regulating biocidal products. But the session was marked mainly by the adoption of the famous financial package, which provides the EU with important supervision mechanisms for avoiding a repeat of the financial and economic crisis.
Views: 38 EPP Group
The European energy security: the case of natural gas
 
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Simone Tagliapietra Senior Researcher Energy Scenarios and Policy FEEM
Views: 121 eniscuolachannel
Implementing Security of Supply | Speech by Walter Boltz
 
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Conference: State of the Union on EU Energy Policy -- 10 May 2012 Panel: Implementing Security of Supply Speaker: Walter BOLTZ (Executive Director, E-Control; Vice President, CEER; Vice Chair, ACER'S Regulatory Board) Europe produces fewer and fewer fossil fuels (oil, gas, coal) and imports them more and more. Even if the EU intends to green all its energy, there still is a very long way to go: 40 years or so. Until then, will the EU get enough energy at the right time and location? Will external producers and various transit countries invest enough and in a timely manner according to the European needs? Will our internal market and our grids make energy flow well wherever we would need it? Will we keep every grid and storage asset "national only" and will we build and operate no common asset at all at the no the EU level? Should any EU framework protect us all vis à vis the rest of the world? Wouldn't we be slightly stronger if really united at the EU level? Download the programme of the conference and all presentations http://fsr.eui.eu/Events/ENERGY/Conference/2012/120509StateUnion.aspx
Implementing Security of Supply | Speech by Jeff Makholm
 
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Conference: State of the Union on EU Energy Policy -- 10 May 2012 Panel: Implementing Security of Supply Speaker: Jeff MAKHOLM (Senior Vice President, NERA Economic Consulting) Europe produces fewer and fewer fossil fuels (oil, gas, coal) and imports them more and more. Even if the EU intends to green all its energy, there still is a very long way to go: 40 years or so. Until then, will the EU get enough energy at the right time and location? Will external producers and various transit countries invest enough and in a timely manner according to the European needs? Will our internal market and our grids make energy flow well wherever we would need it? Will we keep every grid and storage asset "national only" and will we build and operate no common asset at all at the no the EU level? Should any EU framework protect us all vis à vis the rest of the world? Wouldn't we be slightly stronger if really united at the EU level? Download the programme of the conference and all presentations http://fsr.eui.eu/Events/ENERGY/Conference/2012/120509StateUnion.aspx
Implementing Security of Supply | Introduction to panel by Leigh Hancher
 
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Conference: State of the Union on EU Energy Policy -- 10 May 2012 Panel: Implementing Security of Supply Chair: Leigh HANCHER (Professor of European Law, University of Tilburg) Europe produces fewer and fewer fossil fuels (oil, gas, coal) and imports them more and more. Even if the EU intends to green all its energy, there still is a very long way to go: 40 years or so. Until then, will the EU get enough energy at the right time and location? Will external producers and various transit countries invest enough and in a timely manner according to the European needs? Will our internal market and our grids make energy flow well wherever we would need it? Will we keep every grid and storage asset "national only" and will we build and operate no common asset at all at the no the EU level? Should any EU framework protect us all vis à vis the rest of the world? Wouldn't we be slightly stronger if really united at the EU level? Download the programme of the conference and all presentations http://fsr.eui.eu/Events/ENERGY/Conference/2012/120509StateUnion.aspx
A New Architecture for Gas Supply Security | Jacques de Jong
 
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Author: Jacques de Jong (Senior Fellow at Clingendael International Energy Programme) Category: FSR webinar Level: advanced Date of release: December 2012 This is a recording of webinar held on 11th December 2012, moderated by Magdalena Mos (FSR Training Coordinator)
Sebastian Osorio - Security of Supply in the Swiss Electricity Market
 
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HEC Lausanne UNIL Talks: PhD students from HEC Lausanne, University of Lausanne, present their research in a TED-style talk. In this video, Sebastian Osorio talks about Security of Supply in the Swiss Electricity Market
Views: 227 HECLausanneofficial
More solidarity on gas supply
 
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The European Parliament is finalising a new regulation to safeguard the security of gas supply to the EU. Member States facing severe gas shortages will be able to count on help from neighbouring countries under new solidarity rules. Comment on: Google + http://tinyurl.com/orh99s6 Facebook http://www.facebook.com/europeanparliament Twitter https://twitter.com/Europarl_EN
Views: 386 European Parliament
EU Electricity security of supply: Beyond national generation adequacy policies | Arthur Henriot
 
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Author: Arthur Henriot (FSR) Category: FSR webinar recording Level: intermediate Date of release: September 2014 Posted on Wednesday 17th September 2014 Today, Arthur Henriot presented the research results of the work on Beyond national generation adequacy policies: conceiving an EU frame for electricity security of supply? conducted together with Jean-Michel Glachant. http://fsr.eui.eu/Events/ENERGY/Webinar/2014/140915HenriotWebinar.aspx Interested in the topic? Download the related working paper Capacity Remuneration Mechanisms in the European Market: Now but how? http://fsr.eui.eu/Publications/WORKINGPAPERS/Energy/2014/WP201484.aspx and the policy brief Beyond national generation adequacy: Europeanizing the building of capacity mechanisms? http://fsr.eui.eu/Publications/POLICYbrief/Energy/2014/PB201404.aspx This is a recording of webinar held on 17th September 2014, moderated by Riccardo Galletta (FSR) -- Music "I Could Use Time to Just Chill With You" by Ben Seretan is licensed under a Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.
Implementing Security of Supply | Panel Discussion
 
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Conference: State of the Union on EU Energy Policy -- 10 May 2012 Panel: Implementing Security of Supply Chair: Leigh HANCHER (Professor of European Law, University of Tilburg) Panellists: Jacques DE JONG (Senior Fellow, CIEP), Francisco DE LA FLOR (President, GLE), Helmut SCHMITT VON SYDOW (Professor of European Law, University of Lausanne) Europe produces fewer and fewer fossil fuels (oil, gas, coal) and imports them more and more. Even if the EU intends to green all its energy, there still is a very long way to go: 40 years or so. Until then, will the EU get enough energy at the right time and location? Will external producers and various transit countries invest enough and in a timely manner according to the European needs? Will our internal market and our grids make energy flow well wherever we would need it? Will we keep every grid and storage asset "national only" and will we build and operate no common asset at all at the no the EU level? Should any EU framework protect us all vis à vis the rest of the world? Wouldn't we be slightly stronger if really united at the EU level? Download the programme of the conference and all presentations http://fsr.eui.eu/Events/ENERGY/Conference/2012/120509StateUnion.aspx
Energy Security and transnational pipelines  | FSR & HERI Conference on European Energy Law
 
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http://fsr.eui.eu/event/fsr-heri-conference-european-energy-law/ Following the lively debate over the Nord Stream 2 pipeline and the question of the applicability of EU energy law to the importation of gas from third countries, this session will examine several crucial issues which have emerged from the case. For example, what do the divergent opinions of the Directorate General and the Commission’s legal service reveal about the complexities of transnational pipelines? How should energy security be considered in this context? What are the implications of the Commission’s new Energy Security Package? How have existing transnational pipeline projects handled these challenges? Chair: Athanassios Kaissis | Aristotle University of Thessaloniki 1:25 Going beyond Nord Stream II: How to secure the compliance of connecting pipelines with EU energy legislation George Paidakakis | Regulatory Authority for Energy (RAE) 18:44 The Security of Gas Supply under the (EU) Regulation 994/2010, the recent Proposal for its amendment and the importance of the European legal framework on Intergovernmental Agreements with third countries as a means of safeguarding security of supply in the Union John A. Apsouris | Hellenic Petroleum S.A. Alexia Trokoudi | Hellenic Petroleum S.A. 11:11:16 Reflections on procurement, construction and operation of transnational gas pipelines: How far is EU law to be applied? Kyriakos Papanikolaou | Democritus University of Thrace
Economic principles for coordinated reactions to gas supply disruptions | Nico Keyaerts
 
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http://fsr.eui.eu/publications/economic-principles-coordinated-reactions-gas-supply-disruptions/ Economic principles for coordinated reactions to gas supply disruptions: first appraisal of the 2016 package on sustainable energy security Author: Nico KEYAERTS
FSR Energy Regulation Interview | Annegret Groebel, BNetzA & CEER
 
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http://fsr.eui.eu Annegret Groebel is Head of the International Relations Department at BNetzA and Vice President of CEER. Recorded at the 27th meeting of the European Electricity Regulatory Forum, Florence, 27th November 2014. http://ec.europa.eu/energy/en/events/27th-meeting-european-electricity-regulatory-forum-florence Part of a series of seven interviews to support the FSR-CEER Training on the Fundamentals of Energy Regulation http://fsr.eui.eu/Events/ENERGY/Workshop/2015/150420CEERTraining.aspx
Capacity mechanisms and the internal energy market: Legal issues | Malgorzata Sadowska
 
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Author: Malgorzata Sadowska | FSR Category: FSR webinar recording Level: intermediate Date of release: December 2014 Recorded on 17th December 2014 How does EU law treat capacity mechanisms? A number of European countries are concerned about the security of their electricity supply and set up capacity mechanisms to encourage investment in new generation or support existing and less profitable conventional power plants. The European Commission closely examines these state-driven measures under EU law, as their uncoordinated implementation across Europe might have negative effects on the increasingly interconnected energy markets and thwart EU energy policy objectives. What restrictions can the EU law impose on capacity mechanisms to minimise the distortions of the internal energy market? Can state aid, competition policy and internal market rules work? http://fsr.eui.eu/Events/ENERGY/Webinar/2014/141217SadowskaWebinar.aspx This is a recording of webinar held on 17th December 2014, moderated by Riccardo Galletta | Florence School of Regulation -- Music "I Could Use Time to Just Chill With You" by Ben Seretan is licensed under a Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.
Heinz Hilbrecht The forthcoming Energy Infrastructure Package
 
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The Transition to a Low-Carbon Energy Future: Renewable Energy and Grid Development. About the Event: This event focused on the importance of the electricity grid as a key enabler of renewable energy integraton in Ireland and Europe. Over recent years the electricity sector has entered a period of remarkable change. This change has been characterized by a drive to increase environmental sustainability, energy security and economic competiveness, and is being delivered through a commitment to increase the level of renewable energy on the power system. The European Union (EU) aims at increasing the share of renewable energy sources in Europe's final energy consumption to 20% by 2020, and estimates that 35% of total electricity consumption has to come from renewable energy generation to meet this target. Ireland has also adopted its own ambitious renewable energy target that 40% of electricity demand be derived from renewable sources by 2020. Although considerable progress has been made in Ireland and across Europe in the renewable energy space, it is important not to underestimate the many challenges that lie ahead. Today, electricity networks in Ireland and across Europe require significant upgrades and new grid infrastructure in order to integrate increasing amounts of renewbale energy and faciltate the transition towards a low-carbon energy future. While EirGrid's "Grid25" strategy provides Ireland with a solid platform to achieve this goal, difficult challenges remain. Without the approprite grid infrastructure in place, integrating distributed intermittent renewable energy sources will be impossible. In November 2010, the European Commission will present a new Energy Infrastructure package to the European Council and Parliament. It aims to replace the current framework for trans-European energy networks with a broad framework for building a modern integrated grid system Europe-wide. At this event, leading representatives from the European Commission, ENTSO-E, (the represenentative body for EU Transmission System Operators (TSO)) and EirGrid, Ireland's TSO, discussed the challenges and opportunities of building grid infrastructure, and meeting the renewable energy targets in Ireland and Europe. About the Speakers: Heinz Hilbrecht Director for Security of Supply and Energy Markets, European Commission Heinz Hilbrecht is since 2006 director for "Security of Supply and Energy Markets" in the European Commission. His directorate developed the Commission's Strategic Energy Reviews of January 2007 and November 2008 outlining a common approach for the energy policies of the Union. He was responsible for the "Third Energy Package", that is the regulatory framework for the EU gas and electricity markets adopted last year. In 2008/9 he successfully negotiated the Nabucco intergovernmental agreement between four EU Member States and Turkey. A proposal for a new regulation on gas security of supply is currently in the legislative process. His work programme for the current year includes in particular a regulation on transparency and integrity of the gas and electricity wholesale trading markets, and a revision of the Trans-European energy infrastructure programme of the EU. Heinz Hilbrecht began his career as an economist in Germany before joining the energy department of the European Commission in 1980. He worked from 1986 to 1990 at the EU embassy in Washington DC covering energy, environment and transport, and from 1990 to 1991 as assistant to the Commission's Director General for Personnel and Administration in Brussels. In 1991 he became a Head of Unit in transport policy -- first for five years in the aviation sector, and from 1996 to 1999 for railway policy.
Views: 582 IIEA1
EU agrees tighter rules for Russian pipeline:Nord Stream 2
 
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Hello, Welcome to The World Trade News. , Nord Stream 2: EU agrees tighter rules for Russian pipeline EU ambassadors have agreed to toughen regulations on a controversial gas pipeline from Russia to Germany. but they have decided not to back plans that might threaten its completion. Work on the 1,225km (760-mile) Nord Stream 2 pipeline under the Baltic Sea is already well under way and is set to be finished by the end of 2019. The EU wants to bring pipelines coming into the bloc under its energy rules. Germany feared that would make the pipeline uneconomic and unviable. In the end 27 of the bloc's 28 ambassadors reportedly agreed with a Franco-German compromise, which meant that Germany could remain as lead negotiator on the Nord Stream 2 project. Russia currently supplies around 40% of the EU's gas supplies, just ahead of Norway, which is not in the EU but takes part in the bloc's single market. For years, the 28-member bloc has been concerned about reliance on Russian gas. Poland has warned that Russia could use Nord Stream 2 to harm Europe's energy security, and US President Donald Trump even accused Germany of being a "captive" of Russia because of it. Nord Stream 2 will only increase Russia's supply, it also means that, along with its TurkStream project, Russia will be able to bypass Ukrainian pipelines. The loss of transit fees would hit Ukraine's economy hard. A big priority for the EU is to increase competition too, and instead of a patchwork of different agreements for pipelines entering the bloc it wants Nord Stream 2 to come under internal EU rules on transparency and separating ownership of the pipes from the supplier. It is trying to look beyond Russian gas - to imports of US liquified natural gas (LNG) and new pipelines, such as a planned Norway-Poland pipeline via Denmark, that would supply Sweden and other neighbouring states. German businesses have invested heavily in Nord Stream 2 and former Chancellor, Gerhard Schröder is running the project. As well as Germany's Uniper and BASF's Wintershall unit, other European companies have stakes too, including Anglo-Dutch Shell, OMV of Austria and Engie of France. Chancellor Angela Merkel tried to assure Central and Eastern European states on Thursday that the pipeline would not make Germany reliant on Russia for energy. "Germany will expand its network of gas terminals in regards to liquified gas. Meaning, for gas we do not want to be at all dependent on Russia alone," she said. Russian government spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Moscow hoped the disagreement would be sorted out. "We still believe that this project is beneficial to both the European gas consumers' interests and to Russian Federation as gas supplier," he said. Thank you for watching The world Trade news.
You speak about diversity of energy supply but do you really mean it? - Bill Etheridge MEP
 
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http://www.ukipmeps.org | http://ukip.org/join • European Parliament, Strasbourg, 12 September 2017 • Bluecard Question: Bill Etheridge MEP, UK Independence Party (West Midlands), Europe of Freedom and Direct Democracy group (EFDD) - @billukip - Response: Miapetra KUMPULA-NATRI MEP (Finland), Socialist Group (S&D) • Debate: Measures to safeguard the security of gas supply - Report: Jerzy Buzek (A8-0310/2016) Report on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council concerning measures to safeguard the security of gas supply and repealing Regulation (EU) No 994/2010 [COM(2016)0052 - C8-0035/2016 - 2016/0030(COD)] Committee on Industry, Research and Energy .................... • Video: EbS (European Parliament) .................................. EU Member States: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, United Kingdom
Views: 567 UKIP MEPs
Q&A with Naftogaz on Russian gas and Ukraine’s security of supply
 
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Speaking to Gastech News at the EAGC in Geneva, Yuriy Vitrenko, Managing Director – International Business Development at Naftogaz of Ukraine, shared his views on natural gas in Ukraine and answered our questions below: -In light of recent gas disputes, what are Ukraine’s strategies to diversify its gas supply from Russia’s gas? -In terms of regulations and legislative initiatives, how is the government changing the tax regime and other schemes to ensure security of supply in Ukraine? -An update on Ukraine’s talks with Russia: How are the negotiations with Gazprom proceeding? -What lessons can the global gas industry learn from Ukraine’s experience? Hear more at the conference in The Hague, 15 -17 November: http://www.theeagc.com/ Join further discussions at: http://www.gastechnews.com/ Sign up for news at: http://www.gastechnews.com/newsletter-signup/
Views: 148 dmg events
FSR Energy Regulation Interview | Lord John Mogg, CEER
 
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http://fsr.eui.eu Lord John Mogg is President of CEER, Chair of ICER, Chair of ACER Board of Regulators and former Chairman of Ofgem (UK) Recorded at the 27th meeting of the European Electricity Regulatory Forum, Florence, 27th November 2014. http://ec.europa.eu/energy/en/events/27th-meeting-european-electricity-regulatory-forum-florence Part of a series of seven interviews to support the FSR-CEER Training on the Fundamentals of Energy Regulation http://fsr.eui.eu/Events/ENERGY/Workshop/2015/150420CEERTraining.aspx
EU proposes deal to ensure Ukraine gas supplies
 
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Ukraine would repay 3.1 billion US dollars in debts to Russia in exchange for guaranteed gas deliveries through the harsh winter months under a proposal unveiled on Friday after talks brokered by the European Union. The proposed deal, which would expire next spring, is aimed at averting a supply crisis in Ukraine and the EU over the winter but wouldn't resolve a deeper dispute over what price Kiev should pay for past and future deliveries. An arbitration court in Stockholm is expected to rule only next year on that issue. EU Energy Commissioner Guenther Oettinger said there was a good chance of the deal being signed next week, when he plans to get the two countries' energy ministers and top gas executives back together in Berlin. Under the proposal, Kiev would pay two billion US dollars to Moscow by the end of October and another 1.1 billion US dollars by the end of December, Oettinger said. He indicated that the EU would guarantee the Ukrainian debt payments. In exchange, Russian gas company Gazprom would supply at least five billion cubic meters of gas to Ukraine over the coming months at 385 US dollars per 1,000 cubic meters. Ukraine would have to pay up front for that new gas, according to Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/ccfabd69f4c712f1b2d323570caad840 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 15 AP Archive
Online Course: Regulation of Cross-border Network Investments | Leonardo Meeus
 
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http://fsr.eui.eu/training/energy/trans-european-energy-networks-regulation/ What does it really mean when we say “Energy without borders”? What are cross-border interconnections and why do we need them? Europe has the largest electricity market in the world and the regulatory framework in Europe is reaching towards a stronger support of this market. The EU energy policy has introduced ambitious objectives for the competitiveness, sustainability and security of supply of the energy system. To achieve these objectives, important investments are needed in energy infrastructure. These investments are typically international projects or national projects with a cross-border impact that are challenging from a regulatory point of view. This online training starts from a real-life case of the European experience to enter into a more general discussion on how to design a regulatory framework for international investments in energy infrastructure. The training offers insights into some of the latest regulatory trends and practices for investment in energy infrastructure across jurisdictions. The course is led by Leonardo Meeus (FSR, Vlerick Business School, KULeuven). Catharina Sikow-Magny, Head of Unit for Networks and Regional Initiatives in the European Commission, will give a testimonial as a final, live online event of the course. This advanced 5-week online training is aimed at professionals of the energy sector, regulators, policy makers, companies and academics. Even if the course is fully online, the participants will take part in exclusive, live online sessions and a simulation highlighting the new regulatory changes. Thus, we are only able to accept a limited number of participants.
The Electricity Security of Supply in the European Union
 
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In the directive 2005/89/EC of the European parliament and of the Council the European Union has established the legislative framework to safeguard security of electricity supply and undertake significant investment in electricity networks in EU's Member States. The Webinar reviews the complex layers of competences established by the electricity security of supply directives, its rationale, purpose and consequences. The key features of the directives are summarized, specifying how are different competences attributed and effectively undertaken across EU's member states, and what is the way forward envisaged in the Energy Union.
Views: 76 Leonardo ENERGY
The Completion of the Internal Energy Market | Workshop Highlights by FSR Energy
 
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Florence School of Regulation: FSR.EUI.eu Event Programme: http://fsr.eui.eu/Events/ENERGY/Workshop/2015/150130CompletionInternalEnergyMarket.aspx Introduction Alberto Pototschnig | FSR/EUI Session 1: Completing the Internal Energy Markets: Consumer Expectation 3:18 Peter Claes | IFIEC, The expectation of energy intensive consumers Monika Štajnarová | BEUC, Is the internal energy market delivering for smaller consumers? Session 2: Progress Towards the Creation of an Internal Electricity Market 6:00 Christophe Gence-Creux | ACER, Where do we stand? Roundtable: Priorities for completing the internal electricity market Gunnar Lorenz| Eurelectric Robert Staschus| ENTSO-E Hans Randen | NordPool Spot/Europex Session 3: Progress Towards the Creation of an Internal Gas Market 11:00 Dennis Hesseling | ACER, Where do we stand? Roundtable: Priorities for completing the internal gas market Tom Maes | AGWG, (Via conference call, not in video) Vittorio Musazzi | ENTSOG Overview: In the conclusion of its meeting on 4 February 2011, the Council of the European Union set 2014 as the target date for the completion of the Internal Electricity and Gas Markets. This goal was reaffirmed in the conclusions of the meeting on 22 May 2013. Significant progress has been achieved towards meeting this objective, both in terms of the development of the required market and network operation rules and on the ground. In fact, in terms of rulemaking, two network codes have already been adopted, a third one should be adopted soon and ten more have already been recommended for adoption to the European Commission and they could soon enter into the Comitology process. Moreover, a number of the main provisions in these network codes have already been implemented in practice, through the voluntary cooperation of national regulatory authorities (NRAs), transmission system operators (TSOs) and other stakeholders. This early implementation approach has been supported by the Agency for Cooperation of Energy Regulators (ACER), which has coordinated the definition of a number of Roadmaps for the rapid and effective integration of the electricity and gas markets, to deliver tangible benefits to EU energy consumers as soon as possible. In the electricity day-ahead timeframe, a single market-coupling platform operates, since May 2014, to determine prices and cross-border flows on a large part of the EU, from the Straits of Gibraltar to the Barents Sea. Similarly, a single platform is already used for allocating capacity on the majority of internal EU gas interconnection points. However much still remains to be done. The first coordinated auction for long-term electricity cross-border transmission rights is expected to take place in the second half of 2015, on the basis of harmonised auction rules currently being developed. In the intra-day timeframe of the internal electricity market, the development of a single continuous-trading, market-coupling platform has been repeatedly delayed and the go-live is now expected by the end of 2015 at the earliest, more than two years later than originally planned. Liquidity of many gas hubs still needs to be enhanced so that they could provide robust price signals to determine the efficient flow of gas across the EU. A well-functioning internal energy market is also increasingly recognised as an important contributor to the security of energy supply of the EU, as well as a pre-requisite for any additional measure to promote such security. This Workshop aims at reviewing progress in the creation of a single market in electricity and gas across the EU and at identifying what is still missing so that EU consumers can reap the full benefits. The Workshop will be structured in three sessions. Session I will be devoted to assess energy consumers’ expectations from the internal energy market and the benefits already accrued to them. Sessions II and III will aim at reviewing progress towards the creation of a single market in electricity and natural gas, respectively.
Presentation of the ENTSO-E Winter Outlook 2018-19 & ENTSOG Winter Supply Outlook
 
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ENTSO-E and ENTSOG present their respective assessments of security of electricity and gas supply for the winter 2018-2019.
New pipeline to help bring Russian gas to wider EU
 
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1. Various of pipeline regulating station in Czech Republic 2. Wide of Czech Republic Prime Minister Petr Necas approaching media 3. Close cutaway of camera 4. SOUNDBITE: (Czech) Petr Necas, Czech Republic Prime Minister: "I would like to stress that, due to this pipeline being interconnected to the gas pipeline network, this allows us to have a diversified supply of natural gas to the Czech Republic. It also significantly increases the energy security of our country." 5. Camera cutaway 6. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) Anatoly Yanovsky, Russian Deputy Energy Minister: "The implementation of this project, constructed by several countries, shows the necessity to jointly accomplish projects to contribute to the energy security of our countries." 7. Various of pipeline regulating station 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Peter Terium, Chairman of the Board of RWE, AG: "We don't disclose any details about commercial projects that are running. But if you follow the press, we are in the midst of an organised sale which we expect to be included this year." 9. Various of pipeline regulating station STORYLINE: The Czech Republic opened a gas pipeline on Monday that will provide an alternate route for Russian gas imports and will help supply other parts of the EU. Prime Minister Petr Necas opened the 10 billion koruna (519 million US dollar) Gazelle project on Monday. "Due to this pipeline being interconnected to the gas pipeline network, this allows us to have a diversified supply of natural gas to the Czech Republic. It also significantly increases the energy security of our country," Necas told media at a pipeline regulating station in Primda. The 166-kilometre (103-mile) pipeline is connected to Nord Stream, a pipeline that crosses the Baltic Sea and brings natural gas from Russia's Siberia. "The implementation of this project, constructed by several countries, shows the necessity to jointly accomplish projects to contribute to the energy security of our countries," said Russian Deputy Energy Minister Anatoly Yanovsky. The project was built by the pipeline operator Net4GaS. Through the Czech Republic, the gas will flow on to southern Germany and France. EU nations have been seeking new ways to secure gas supplies since Russian shipments transported through Ukrainian pipelines were cut off in January 2009 due to a dispute between the two countries. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/5676477c8f5b188427ace9371eed1b4a Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 74 AP Archive
Gas Export and Enhancing Reliability of Gas Supply to Europe (June 7, 2018)
 
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Press Conference: Gas Export and Enhancing Reliability of Gas Supply to Europe (June 7, 2018). Video provided by TASS. http://www.gazprom.com/press/news/conference/2018/export-to-europe/
Views: 70 Gazprom
The role of capacity markets in the electricity market transition
 
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The European Commission presented two proposals on Electricity Market Design as part of its Clean Energy Package of November 2016. Discussions on the package have tended to focus on the level of ambition, in particular Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency targets. The European Parliament supports higher targets while Member States lean towards a more cautious approach, setting the scene for tense negotiations.  Meanwhile, European electricity markets are undergoing structural changes due to rising demand for capacity, the gradual phase out of coal and funding restraints. New investments are insufficient to bridge the gap.  This raises several questions about the future of capacity mechanisms in the EU. How should they be designed not only to ensure security of supply and preserve competition in the Single Market, but also to support market reforms, renewable energy integration and promote emerging demand response technologies. Lessons learnt from the Member States are an important part of that discussion. More than a year after the publication of the Clean Energy Package, EURACTIV organised this forum on the future of the EU power industry. Questions included:  - What is the way forward for the Clean Energy Package? - What are the lessons learnt from existing capacity markets in Europe?  - Can European power markets exist without capacity mechanisms?  - How should they be designed to strengthen the goals of the Energy Union?
Views: 553 EURACTIV
Jacques de Jong | Restructuring the EU Energy Infrastructure
 
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Florence School of Regulation Video Lecture, March 2013 Jacques de Jong (Senior Fellow at CIEP) speaks about the process of liberalisation of the EU energy market over the past decade and the new challenges for the EU Internal Energy Market. Quick Overview This lecture touches upon the following topics: Restructuring EU energy industry, third energy package, energy market liberalisation, unbundling, ENTSOs, framework guidelines and network codes, EU market integration, cross-border cooperation, market and price coupling, gas entry exit zones, investment in infrastructure, TYNDP, security of gas supply, energy roadmap 2050. ***To properly view this lecture please make sure to modify the quality on the lower right corner to at least 720p*** http://fsr.eui.eu -- Music "I Could Use Time to Just Chill With You" by Ben Seretan is licensed under a Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.
Energy Union: Content or Packaging? An open debate in Brussels … and at the Florence School
 
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http://FSR.eui.eu 0:00:03 Introducing the paper European Energy Union, Tadhg O'Briain | European Commission 0:24:26 Christian Oliver | Financial Times, opens the debate, Energy Union, Content or Packaging? 00:51:48 Looking East and West, Security of Supply 1:13:36 LNG in the EU? 1:28:56 Future of buying gas in the EU 1:41:41 Electricity Markets and the buzz word "convergence" 1:52:32 Questions from the Audience 20 March 2015, CEER Secretariat, Cours Saint-Michel 30a, 1040 Brussels Belgium Panellist : Sami Andoura | Jacques Delors Institute/College of Europe Jean-Michel Glachant | FSR Tadhg O'Briain | European Commission Georg Zachmann | Bruegel Jean-Arnold Vinois | Jacques Delors Institute
Market Movers Europe, Jan 14-18: Court to rule on Groningen gas production
 
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In this week's Market Movers: EU members are due to vote on steel import quotas, while oil markets await data from OPEC and the International Energy Agency to provide signals on output cuts. Emma Slawinski, Editor, S&P Global Platts Insight, explores these and other topics that may impact Europe's commodity markets this week: • Court to rule on Groningen gas production • Oil production cuts under scrutiny • Sour crude to remain pricey in Med • Markets watch for outcome of Brexit vote • EU nations to vote on steel import quotas • Time running out for German coal debate • Chinese New Year could boost freight rates ---------------------------------- Subscribe for more #PlattsMM updates: http://plts.co/w7hd30cmrHv ---------------------------------- Keep up to date with all the latest S&P Global Platts news by tweeting us at @SPGlobalPlatts and by using the hashtag #PlattsMM: http://plts.co/xT6P30kqU7D ---------------------------------- You can also follow all our latest updates by following us on: Website: https://www.spglobal.com/platts/en Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SPGlobalPlatts/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/SPGlobalPlatts/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/spglobalplatts
Views: 139 S&P Global Platts
Environmental Protection vs. Energy Supply Security - The Shale Gas Case
 
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This panel discussion considers the benefits and risks of shale gas extraction and hydraulic fracking in the United States and the European Union. The complexity, interrelation and competition between environmental protection and energy supply security is an emerging problem. Often, State environmental protection concerns and standards are outweighed by a competing interest, such as ensuring energy supply security. The shale gas example demonstrates that even in advanced jurisdictions with high standards of environmental protection, ecosystem services are compromised for energy generation purposes. Referring to case studies from the European Union the panelists explain the impacts of shale gas extraction on the individual elements of the environment and establishes how these result in the degradation of ecosystems and its services. Further, the panelists discuss if an ecosystem services approach can ease the competition between energy security and environmental protection can establish economic and environmental equity. This event was part of the IUCN Academy of Environmental Law's 2012 Colloquium which was hosted at the University of Maryland's Carey School of Law. https://www.law.umaryland.edu
Views: 591 Maryland Carey Law
history channel documentary - Russian Gas Supply to Europe - Putin Gas
 
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history channel documentary - Russian Gas Supply to Europe - Putin Gas videos history channel documentary - Russia Documentary - Gas Supply in the EU - Putin Gas I created this video with the YouTube . history channel documentary - Russia and Security of Gas Supply in the EU - Putin Gas history channel documentary - Russia and Security of Gas Supply in the . history channel documentary - US oil - Low Oil Prices 2015 - Putin Oil Prices - Russia Oil and Gas I created this video with the . history channel documentary .
Views: 161 Arkyn Pedersen
EU meets to discuss energy security against background of Ukraine crisis
 
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European leaders are to seek ways of reducing their dependence on Russian gas at two days of talks in Brussels. Moscow's incursion into Ukraine has raised concerns that the supply of energy could be used as a weapon in the East-West crisis. Member states are also expected to pledge to provide Ukraine with gas if needed. Ukraine, which has been cut off once before by Moscow for non-payment of bills, could benefit from a reverse -flow pipeline deal to ship gas from Slovakia. The talks are a... READ MORE : http://www.euronews.com/2014/03/20/eu-meets-to-discuss-energy-security-against-background-of-ukraine-crisis What is in the news today? Click to watch: http://eurone.ws/1kb2gOl euronews: the most watched news channel in Europe Subscribe! http://eurone.ws/10ZCK4a euronews is available in 14 languages: http://eurone.ws/17moBCU In English: Website: http://www.euronews.com/news Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/euronews Twitter: http://twitter.com/euronews Google+: http://google.com/+euronews VKontakte: http://vk.com/en.euronews
European Energy Markets Observatory 18th Edition
 
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https://www.capgemini.com/eemo Capgemini's European Energy Markets Observatory (EEMO) is an annual report initiated in 2002. It analyzes the evolutions of the electricity and gas markets in EU-28 (plus Norway and Switzerland) by tracking the progress of multiple subjects: the establishment of open and competitive markets, the reaching of the EU's Energy-Climate objectives, the adequacy between supply and demand or the realization of the energy market integration. Colette Lewiner speaks about key findings from EEMO 18th Edition. Watch the video to know more.
Views: 893 Capgemini
Ukraine Energy Security Guarantees: PM says deal securing Russian gas supplies to EU needed
 
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An energy security agreement is needed to ensure Russian gas supplies to Europe through Ukraine during the coming winter season – that was the demand of Ukraine’s Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk on Tuesday, during a government board meeting with top energy officials. Check out our website: http://uatoday.tv Facebook: https://facebook.com/uatodaytv Twitter: https://twitter.com/uatodaytv
Views: 416 UKRAINE TODAY
Experts criticize EU energy policies
 
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Experts at this conference in Brussels agreed that the European Union is vulnerable because it imports more than half of its vital energy requirements. The bloc takes in huge volumes of gas from Russia but future cooperation between Moscow and Brussels has been thrown into doubt over the Ukraine conflict. The European Commission says the EU might approach Iran in the future, to become a potential gas supplier, if diplomatic relations improve. Analysts say this would be wise. Live @ http://www.presstv.ir/live.html Twitter @ http://twitter.com/PressTV LiveLeak @ http://www.liveleak.com/c/PressTV Facebook @ http://www.facebook.com/PRESSTV Google+ @ http://plus.google.com/+VideosPTV Instagram @ http://instagram.com/presstvchannel
Views: 99 PressTV
EU/Russia: Are politics driving gas?
 
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Senior CIS analyst Yulia Rusanova discusses the impact of Ukraine's crisis on Russia/EU gas relations and the outlook for the EU energy policy.
Views: 194 Oxford Analytica
EU may face gas disruption if Ukraine siphons Russian supplies
 
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Europeans potentially face a cold winter ahead, if Russian gas destined for consumers gets lost on its way via Ukraine. RT's Peter Oliver reports. RT LIVE http://rt.com/on-air Subscribe to RT! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=RussiaToday Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTnews Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_com Follow us on Instagram http://instagram.com/rt Follow us on Google+ http://plus.google.com/+RT RT (Russia Today) is a global news network broadcasting from Moscow and Washington studios. RT is the first news channel to break the 1 billion YouTube views benchmark.
Views: 8599 RT
Could gas be sustainable?
 
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On the margins of the FSR Policy Workshop: Towards "net zero" methane emissions in the gas sector – challenges and opportunities (http://fsr.eui.eu/event/towards-net-zero-methane-emissions-in-the-gas-sector-challenges-and-opportunities/), organised in cooperation with Gas Infrastructure Europe (GIE), Andris Piebalgs (Part-time Professor, FSR) and dr. Paul Balcombe (SGI, Imperial College London) discuss the challenges related to the methane emissions from the gas sector. Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas, which contributed significantly to the increase in warming since the industrial revolution. There are different sources of methane emissions, including the natural. However, oil and gas supply chains constitute the second biggest source of the anthropogenic methane emissions after the agriculture. Paul Balcombe explains that the better understanding of the problem, investment in better monitoring, and the identification of the most cost-efficient reductions are key first steps to abate methane emissions. Indirectly the issue of methane emissions is related to the future of gas in the decarbonised energy system. At the end of the interview, dr. Balcombe elaborates on the sustainable forms of gas – biogas, hydrogen.
Central Europe Energy Conference 2014
 
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The aim of the 8th annual CEEC 2014 conference is to evaluate the achievements of the V4 regional energy cooperation and to discuss its further prospects. Furthermore, the conference aims to assess consequences of global energy trends on both energy security and economic competiveness of the EU and, in particular, the region of Central Europe. In addition, it will examine regulatory and business conditions for the development of nuclear energy in Central Europe in the context of the EU climate and energy policy. It will pay special attention to lessons learned by the V4 countries from implementing the targets of the EU 2020 Framework in the field of energy efficiency and R&D, and finally, to the process of integrating the gas markets of the V4 countries, including security of supply. Dinner sessions of the conference will also include other specific topics that are central to present developments in the energy sector.
Views: 271 sfpa.sk
The latest episode of "This Week in Focus" discusses Europe's energy security.
 
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Expert Ariel Cohen joins the latest episode of "This Week in Focus", to talk about Europe's energy security, gas supplies from Caspian Region and Azerbaijan's role in the Southern Gas Corridor
Views: 444 This Week in Focus
Europe Considers Fracking to Cut Russian Gas Imports (VOA)
 
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Some European nations are looking at new ways to recover natural gas at home. These methods include a disputed process known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. From VOA Learning English, this is the Economics Report. The political crisis in Ukraine has foreced many European nations to reconsider their dependence on Russia for energy. Some nations are looking at new ways to recover natural gas at home. These methods include a disputed process known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. The process involves the use of liquid chemicals to break rock. Experts belive Europe might have trillions of cubic meters of shale gas. Shale is a kind of gas-bearing rock. France, Poland and Ukraine are thought to have the largest amounts of shale gas. Large supplies have been found in Romania, Bulgaria and the United Kingdom. Lucia Seybert is with the Wilson Center in Washington. She says large shale gas reserves and political problems in Ukraine have increased interest in Europe's shale gas. But Europe is believed to be years away from major shale gas production. Poland, the United Kingdom and Romania are expected to start exploration by 2020. Removing shale gas through hydraulic fracking is the subjects of often intense debate. Most drilling areas in Europe are near populated areas. And environmental groups have raised concerns about water and air pollution from fracking. Much of Europe's gas flows through a pipeline from Russia across Ukraine. But Ukraine has had difficulty paying Russia's Gazprom energy company. And early this year, Ukrainian protesters ousted the country's pro-Russia president. The new government signed economic agreements with the European Union, over Russian objections. Now, Russia has signaled it may cut off gas to Ukraine, and to much of Europe. For VOA Learning English, I am Carla Babb. For personal practicing. Have fun learning english everyday with http://voalearningenglish.org
The Changing Geo-politics of Energy Supply
 
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Is the dependency of Central and South Eastern Europe on Russia and Russian energy as great as it is widely perceived to be? What significiant differences exist between current energy polices, and which makes most sense in the light of changing economic and political realities? Are there alternatives to Russian gas and oil? What does dependency really mean? Can it be translated into political dependency? To what extent do European integration and the rule of law provide the foundations of an energy market that best meets the needs of the Eastern half of the EU? Is the Energy Union the answer? The Danube Institute organized an international conference on energy politics on 15 September 2015.
Views: 78 Danube Institute
The Impact of US LNG on Russian Natural Gas Export Policy
 
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Growing supplies of liquefied natural gas from the United States and other countries has dramatic implications for global gas markets, especially around pricing and flexibility of delivery. The changes underway will have important implications for traditional dominant players such as Russia, one of the top suppliers of gas to Europe. Please join the Center on Global Energy Policy for a public event with Dr. Tatiana Mitrova, Director of the SKOLKOVO Energy Centre in Moscow and CGEP Fellow, for a presentation on her upcoming study which examines how Russia’s Gazprom will respond to rising competition from new LNG producers. After a brief presentation we will move to a discussion moderated by Amy Jaffe, David M. Rubenstein senior fellow for energy and the environment and director of the Energy Security and Climate Change program at the Council on Foreign Relations. Ira Joseph, CGEP Fellow & Global Head, Gas & Power Analytics, S&P Global Platts and Dr. Timothy Frye, Chair of the Department of Political Science and Marshall Shulman Professor of Post-Soviet Politics at Columbia University, will also join the panel discussion.
Views: 975 Columbia SIPA