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Stock Exchanges, a history
 
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Interested in learning about the Stock Market and its history. This is the right documentary.
Views: 44195 Mehdi Elharti
Inside The New York Stock Exchange - Brief Tour And History
 
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To book a tour of the Financial District/Wall Street area, click on http://knowbeforeyougonewyork.com/nyse. To see more videos about New York City like this one, click on http://knowbeforeyougonewyork.com Book a private tour of New York by sending an email to [email protected] Music Credit: Corporation Motivation by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Artist: http://audionautix.com/
Views: 15850 WS Westwood
WALL STREET HISTORIC FILM  NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE "BEHIND THE TICKER TAPE" 72892
 
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Dating from 1957, "Behind the Ticker Tape" tells the story of the American Stock Exchange (now NYSE), showing how securities sales have evolved over the years, and giving a profile of the ASE at the height of its activity. NYSE MKT LLC, formerly known as the American Stock Exchange (AMEX), is an American stock exchange situated in New York City, New York. AMEX was previously a mutual organization, owned by its members. Until 1953, it was known as the New York Curb Exchange. On January 17, 2008, NYSE Euronext announced it would acquire the AMEX for $260 million in stock; on October 1, 2008, NYSE Euronext completed the acquisition. Before the closing of the acquisition, NYSE Euronext announced that the AMEX would be integrated with the Alternext European small-cap exchange and renamed the NYSE Alternext U.S. In March 2009, NYSE Alternext U.S. was changed to NYSE Amex Equities. On May 10, 2012, NYSE Amex Equities changed its name to NYSE MKT LLC. These brokers often traded stocks that were speculative in nature. With the discovery of oil in the latter half of the 19th century, even oil stocks entered into the curb market. By 1865, following the American Civil War, stocks in small industrial companies, such as iron and steel, textiles and chemicals were first sold by curbstone brokers. Efforts to organize and standardize the market started early in the 20th century under Emanuel S. Mendels and Carl H. Pforzheimer.. In 1908, the New York Curb Market Agency was established, to codify trading practices. In 1911, the curbstone brokers came to be known as the New York Curb Market, which then had a formal constitution with brokerage and listing standards. After several years of outdoor trading, the curbstone brokers moved indoors in 1921 to New York Curb Exchange Building on Greenwich Street in Lower Manhattan. In 1929, the New York Curb Market changed its name to the New York Curb Exchange. Within no time, the Curb Exchange became the leading international stock market, listing more foreign issues than all other U.S. securities markets combined. In 1953 the Curb Exchange was renamed the American Stock Exchange. Paul Kolton was named as president of the exchange in 1971, making him the first person to be selected from within the exchange to serve as its leader, succeeding Ralph S. Saul, who announced his resignation in March 1971. In November 1972, Kolton was named as the exchange's first chief executive officer and its first salaried top executive. Kolton opposed the idea of a merger with the New York Stock Exchange while he headed the exchange saying that "two independent, viable exchanges are much more likely to be responsive to new pressures and public needs than a single institution". Kolton announced in July 1977 that he would be leaving his position at the American Exchange in November of that year. The American Stock Exchange merged with the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE Euronext) on October 1, 2008.[4] Post merger, the Amex equities business was branded "NYSE Alternext US". As part of the re-branding exercise, NYSE Alternext US was re-branded as NYSE Amex Equities. On December 1, 2008, the Curb Exchange building at 86 Trinity Place was closed, and the Amex Equities trading floor was moved to the NYSE Trading floor at 11 Wall Street. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 12622 PeriscopeFilm
New York's History of Slavery
 
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New York has been for the most of in its history the largest, most diverse and economically ambitious city in America. Anchored by Wall Street, New York City has been called both the most economically powerful city and the hub of the global financial center. The city is home to the world's two largest stock exchanges by total market capitalization, the New York Stock Exchange andNASDAQ. But for more than 2 centuries New York was also a hub for America's slave trade. Enslaved and free Africans were largely responsible for the construction of the early city, first by clearing land, then by building a fort, mills, bridges, houses, and even the first city hall. The very name Wall Street is born of slavery, as they built a wall in 1653 to protect Dutch settlers from Indian raids. Join us on this edition of Inside Out for a tour of Lower Manhattan to explore the often overlooked history of enslaved and free Africans in early New York. We'll make stops at historic sites most tour guides and buses will never show you. Thumbnail image from: fineartamerica.com
Views: 17109 InsideOut Ptv
PT1 THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE GOT ITS START WITH SLAVERY
 
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This is an overview on the wicked history behind the start of the New York Stock Exchange according to biblical prophecy
Views: 3526 gmsProphecySoup
Top 10 Largest Stock Exchanges In The World
 
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► Support With Your Comment Subscribe To Our Channel ► http://bit.ly/SxmsCelik-SUBs-NOW Facebook Page ► http://bit.ly/SCLikeFacebookPagee Donate My Channel ► http://bit.ly/DONATE-ME 10. Deutsche Börse – $1.71 trillion The powerful German economy and its firms are largely influenced by what goes on at the Frankfurt stock exchange. 9. Shenzhen Stock Exchange – $1.91 trillion The rise of the Chinese economy has allowed the Shanghai-based exchange to penetrate the top ten. 8. TMX Group – $2.20 trillion Trading the best Canada has to offer, the Toronto-based TMX Group operates the country’s most important stock exchanges. 7. Shanghai Stock Exchange – $2.86 trillion The second Chinese stock market is also located in Shanghai, but is far larger than its counterpart. 6. Hong Kong Stock Exchange – $3.14 trillion As one of the largest global trade centers, Hong Kong’s financial growth has been absolutely stunning and continues on the same trajectory. 5. London Stock Exchange Group – $3.39 trillion Despite being one of the most important financial centers throughout history, the city is no longer as powerful as it once was. 4. Euronext – $3.50 trillion Commanding the economies of the Netherlands, France, Belgium, and Portugal, this exchange not only has several members, but also several headquarters. 3. Japan Exchange Group – $4.48 trillion Trading shares of some of the most advanced corporations in the world, the Tokyo-based stock exchange has grown to become one of the world’s biggest. 2. NASDAQ – $6.68 trillion The second largest stock exchange in the world is the NASDAQ, located in New York and trading, among others, very lucrative technology stocks. 1. New York Stock Exchange – $18.77 trillion By far the most important financial trading grounds in the world today, the New York Stock Exchange is home to some the biggest and most powerful corporations from the United States. Edit: Sehmous Celik Contact ► [email protected] For Copyright Issues ► [email protected] ▼Follow Me On▼ Website ► http://sxmscelik.com/ Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/scvideos Instagram ► https://instagram.com/sxmscelik Twitter ► http://www.twitter.com/scvideoss Youtube ► http://www.youtube.com/scvideos Google+ ► http://plus.google.com/+scvideos Pinterest ► http://www.pinterest.com/sxmscelik
Views: 17789 SC Videos
How the New York Stock Exchange Works: Brokers and Bidders - Making Money (1958)
 
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The exchange was closed shortly after the beginning of World War I (July 31, 1914), but it partially re-opened on November 28 of that year in order to help the war effort by trading bonds, and completely reopened for stock trading in mid-December. More on stocks: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=tra0c7-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=76d788a3703b8fff187a2f806c15b98b&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=books&keywords=stocks On September 16, 1920, a bomb exploded on Wall Street outside the NYSE building, killing 33 people and injuring more than 400. The perpetrators were never found. The NYSE building and some buildings nearby, such as the JP Morgan building, still have marks on their façades caused by the bombing. The Black Thursday crash of the Exchange on October 24, 1929, and the sell-off panic which started on Black Tuesday, October 29, are often blamed for precipitating the Great Depression. In an effort to try to restore investor confidence, the Exchange unveiled a fifteen-point program aimed to upgrade protection for the investing public on October 31, 1938. On October 1, 1934, the exchange was registered as a national securities exchange with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, with a president and a thirty-three member board. On February 18, 1971 the non-profit corporation was formed, and the number of board members was reduced to twenty-five. One of Abbie Hoffman's well-known publicity stunts took place in 1967, when he led members of the Yippie movement to the Exchange's gallery. The provocateurs hurled fistfuls of real dollars mixed with fake dollars toward the trading floor below. Some traders booed, and some collected the apparent bounty. The press was quick to respond and, by evening, the event had been reported around the world.[citation needed] (The stock exchange later spent $20,000 to enclose the gallery with bulletproof glass.) Hoffman wrote a decade later, "We didn't call the press; at that time we really had no notion of anything called a media event". On October 19, 1987, the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) dropped 508 points, a 22.6% loss in a single day, the second-biggest one-day drop the exchange had experienced, prompting officials at the exchange to invoke for the first time the "circuit breaker" rule to halt all trading. This was a very controversial move and led to a quick change in the rule; trading now halts for an hour, two hours, or the rest of the day when the DJIA drops 10, 20, or 30 percent, respectively. The rationale behind the trading halt was to give investors a chance to cool off and reevaluate their positions. Black Monday was followed by Terrible Tuesday, a day in which the Exchange's systems did not perform well and some people had difficulty completing their trades. Subsequently, there was another major drop for the Dow on October 13, 1989; the Mini-Crash of 1989. The crash was apparently caused by a reaction to a news story of a $6.75 billion leveraged buyout deal for UAL Corporation, the parent company of United Airlines, which broke down. When the UAL deal fell through, it helped trigger the collapse of the junk bond market causing the Dow to fall 190.58 points, or 6.91 percent. Similarly, there was a panic in the financial world during the year of 1997; the Asian Financial Crisis. Like the fall of many foreign markets, the Dow suffered a 7.18% drop in value (554.26 points) on October 27, 1997, in what later became known as the 1997 Mini-Crash but from which the DJIA recovered quickly. On January 26, 2000, an altercation during filming of the music video for "Sleep Now in the Fire", which was directed by Michael Moore, caused the doors of the exchange to be closed and the band Rage Against the Machine to be escorted from the site by security[17] after band members attempted to gain entry into the exchange.[18] Trading on the exchange floor, however, continued uninterrupted.[19] In the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, the NYSE was closed for 4 trading sessions, one of the longest times the NYSE was closed for more than one session; only the third time since March 1933. On May 6, 2010, the Dow Jones Industrial Average posted its largest intraday percentage drop since the October 19, 1987 crash, with a 998 point loss later being called the 2010 Flash Crash (as the drop occurred in minutes before rebounding). The SEC and CFTC published a report on the event, although it did not come to a conclusion as to the cause. The regulators found no evidence that the fall was caused by erroneous ("fat finger") orders.[20] On October 29, 2012, the stock exchange was shut down for 2 days due to Hurricane Sandy.[21] The last time the stock exchange was closed due to weather for a full two days was on March 12 and 13 in 1888. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Stock_Exchange
Views: 11261 The Film Archives
How The Stock Exchange Works (For Dummies)
 
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Why are there stocks at all? Everyday in the news we hear about the stock exchange, stocks and money moving around the globe. Still, a lot of people don't have an idea why we have stock markets at all, because the topic is usually very dry. We made a short video about the basics of the stock exchanges. With robots. Robots are kewl! Short videos, explaining things. For example Evolution, the Universe, the Stock Market or controversial topics like Fracking. Because we love science. We would love to interact more with you, our viewers to figure out what topics you want to see. If you have a suggestion for future videos or feedback, drop us a line! :) We're a bunch of Information designers from munich, visit us on facebook or behance to say hi! https://www.facebook.com/Kurzgesagt https://www.behance.net/kurzgesagt How the Stock Exchange works Help us caption & translate this video! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCsXVk37bltHxD1rDPwtNM8Q&tab=2
An Overview of the New York Stock Exchange: Building, Trading Floor, History (1998)
 
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The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), sometimes known as the "Big Board", is a stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States. More on the NYSE: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=tra0c7-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=7dfab24c59ae2892ac3f17c1a4ede1f5&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=books&keywords=nyse It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$16.613 trillion as of May 2013. Average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of four rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building, located at 18 Broad Street, between the corners of Wall Street and Exchange Place, was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1978, as was the 11 Wall Street building. The NYSE is operated by NYSE Euronext (NYSE: NYX), which was formed by the NYSE's 2007 merger with the fully electronic stock exchange Euronext. In December 2012, it was announced that the company would be sold to Intercontinental Exchange (ICE), a futures exchange headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, United States, for $8 billion, a figure that is significantly less than the $11 billion bid for the company tendered in 2011. The origin of the NYSE can be traced to May 17, 1792, when the Buttonwood Agreement was signed by 24 stockbrokers outside of 68 Wall Street in New York under a buttonwood tree on Wall Street.[10] On March 8, 1817, the organization drafted a constitution and renamed itself the "New York Stock & Exchange Board". Anthony Stockholm was elected the Exchange's first president. The last central location of the Exchange was a room, rented in 1792 for $200 a month, located at 40 Wall Street. After that location was destroyed in the Great Fire of New York in 1835, the Exchange moved to a temporary headquarters. In 1863, the New York Stock & Exchange Board changed to its current name, the New York Stock Exchange. In 1865, the Exchange moved to 10--12 Broad Street. The New York Stock Exchange was closed for ten days starting September 20, 1873, because of the Panic of 1873.[11] The volume of stocks traded increased sixfold in the years between 1896 and 1901, and a larger space was required to conduct business in the expanding marketplace.[12] Eight New York City architects were invited to participate in a design competition for a new building; ultimately, the Exchange selected the neoclassic design submitted by architect George B. Post. Demolition of the Exchange building at 10 Broad Street, and adjacent buildings, started on May 10, 1901. The main façade featuring six tall columns with Corinthian capitals The new building, located at 18 Broad Street, cost $4 million and opened on April 22, 1903. The trading floor, at 109 × 140 feet (33 × 42.5 m), was one of the largest volumes of space in the city at the time, and had a skylight set into a 72-foot (22 m)-high ceiling. The main façade of the building features six tall columns with Corinthian capitals, topped by a marble pediment containing high-relief sculptures by John Quincy Adams Ward with the collaboration of Paul Wayland Bartlett, carved by the Piccirilli Brothers, representing Integrity Protecting the Works of Man. The building was listed as a National Historic Landmark and added to the National Register of Historic Places on June 2, 1978.[13] In 1922, a building for offices, designed by Trowbridge & Livingston, was added at 11 Wall Street, as well as a new trading floor called the Garage. Additional trading floor space was added in 1969 the Blue Room, and in 1988 the EBR or Extended Blue Room, with the latest technology for information display and communication. Yet another trading floor was opened at 30 Broad Street called the Bond Room in 2000. As the NYSE introduced its hybrid market, a greater proportion of trading came to be executed electronically, and due to the resulting reduction in demand for trading floor space, the NYSE decided to close the 30 Broad Street trading room in early 2006. As the adoption of electronic trading continued to reduce the number of traders and employees on the floor, in late 2007, the NYSE closed the rooms created by the 1969 and 1988 expansions. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NYSE Image By Kowloonese (08:27, 30 May 2004) (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)], via Wikimedia Commons
Views: 18998 The Film Archives
Lauren Simmons Is Making History As Trader At The New York Stock Exchange | NowThis
 
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This trader isn't just the youngest woman at the New York Stock Exchange — she's also the only Black woman on the floor. » Subscribe to NowThis: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe Lauren Simmons is one woman of Wall Street that's changing the game for millennials and young women in finance. In this Lauren Simmons interview, NYSE trader, Lauren Simmons talks about what it's like to be a young woman of color working in an industry that's predominately all men. #money #nyc #women #empowerment #nyse #fearlessgirl Connect with NowThis » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat NowThis is your premier news outlet providing you with all the videos you need to stay up to date on all the latest in trending news. From entertainment to politics, to viral videos and breaking news stories, we’re delivering all you need to know straight to your social feeds. We live where you live. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisnews @nowthisnews
Views: 3212 NowThis News
Watch high-speed trading in action
 
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Citadel Group, a high-frequency trading firm located in Chicago, trades more stocks each day than the floor of the NYSE.
Views: 4172704 CNN Business
How the New York Stock Exchange Works
 
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In our top story Nicole takes us on a tour of the New York Stock Exchange. The NYSE was founded in 1792 and today billions of dollars exchange hands there everyday. More than 2,000 companies trade their stock there. Owning stock is like owning a stake in a company, if the company does well you can make money, if it does badly you can lose money. Website: http://www.teenkidsnews.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TEENKIDSNEWSTV Twitter: https://twitter.com/teenkidsnews Instagram: http://instagram.com/teenkidsnews# Teen Kids News is an Emmy Award winning 1/2 hour weekly TV show that is informative, educational and fun! The show has been on the air for over 10 years!
Views: 74412 Teen Kids News
Inside Wall Street: NYSEinstein Peter Tuchman explains the New York Stock Exchange
 
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The New York Stock Exchange is the most important stock exchange in the world and the U.S. financial heart. But a lot of things have changed on Wall Street over the last decades. Trader Peter Tuchman is over 30 years on the floor. He explains the changes on Wirtschaft TV.
Views: 21698 Wirtschaft TV
BEHIND THE TICKER TAPE  1950s AMERICAN STOCK EXCHANGE HISTORY FILM  87554 MD
 
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Dating from 1957, "Behind the Ticker Tape" is a wonderful film that tells the story of the American Stock Exchange (now NYSE), showing how securities sales have evolved over the years, and giving a profile of the ASE at the height of its activity. NYSE MKT LLC, formerly known as the American Stock Exchange (AMEX), is an American stock exchange situated in New York City, New York. AMEX was previously a mutual organization, owned by its members. Until 1953, it was known as the New York Curb Exchange. The film begins with shots of the AMEX floor including the visitor's gallery, where the public could watch the frenzied exchange of stock. Hand signals are seen at 1:08, resulting in the sale of thousands of dollars of stock. At 1:30, a new broker who has just achieved a seat on the exchange, is shown arriving for work. His mentors talk to him about how to handle stock purchasing customers and how to counsel investors. At 4:30, the Gold Rush is shown, and there is a discussion of how the stock market helps American commerce grow and thrive. At 5:00 the so-called "curb market" is re-enacted on the streets of Manhattan. At 6:00, the curb market on Wall Street caused a change of venue, to 44 Broad Street, but the trading posts were still outside. At 7:30, the 1908 meeting of leading brokers to form the "New York Curb Agency", which was the forerunner of the AMEX. At 9:20, the arrival of the telephone revolutionized stock trading, but also (as the film shows) caused chaos. At 11:45, the development of the use of hand gestures to conduct sales is shown, as well as colorful hats. At 14:00, the modern stock market of the 1920s-1950s is shown. At 14:50, the ticker tape machine is shown and its use explained. The use of teletypes is also shown in the placing of a buy order. At 15:53, an annunciator board is used to get the attention of a broker for the order and an order is placed. The film ends with a discussion of the future, showing the AMEX building at 19:00 and describing its "lightning fast" communications network where the "future is being born". These brokers often traded stocks that were speculative in nature. With the discovery of oil in the latter half of the 19th century, even oil stocks entered into the curb market. By 1865, following the American Civil War, stocks in small industrial companies, such as iron and steel, textiles and chemicals were first sold by curbstone brokers. Efforts to organize and standardize the market started early in the 20th century under Emanuel S. Mendels and Carl H. Pforzheimer.. In 1908, the New York Curb Market Agency was established, to codify trading practices. In 1911, the curbstone brokers came to be known as the New York Curb Market, which then had a formal constitution with brokerage and listing standards. After several years of outdoor trading, the curbstone brokers moved indoors in 1921 to New York Curb Exchange Building on Greenwich Street in Lower Manhattan. In 1929, the New York Curb Market changed its name to the New York Curb Exchange. Within no time, the Curb Exchange became the leading international stock market, listing more foreign issues than all other U.S. securities markets combined. In 1953 the Curb Exchange was renamed the American Stock Exchange. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 1037 PeriscopeFilm
How the New York Stock Exchange Works:Cartoon Tutorial
 
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How the New York Stock Exchange Works
Views: 24915 modrika4u
9-11 From Inside the New York Stock Exchange
 
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9-11 From Inside the New York Stock Exchange
What is The NYSE (New York Stock Exchange) ?
 
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Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is the “NYSE” The New York Stock Exchange, often referred to as NYSE and "The Big Board," is the largest stock exchange by market capitalization in the world. Home to more than 2,800 companies with a combined value of more than $15 trillion, the NYSE relies on face-to-face trades, rather than electronic trades. The NYSE began in 1792, when 24 stockbrokers gathered under a buttonwood tree on Wall Street to sign an agreement that established the rules for buying and selling bonds and shares of companies. This agreement, or the Buttonwood Agreement, was named after the tree. The NYSE is the oldest and largest stock exchange in the U.S., located on Wall Street in New York City. The NYSE is responsible for setting policy, supervising member activities, listing securities, overseeing the transfer of member seats, and evaluating applicants. Unlike some of the newer exchanges, the NYSE still uses a large trading floor in order to conduct its transactions. It is here that the representatives of buyers and sellers, professionals known as brokers, meet and shout out prices at one another in order to strike a deal. This is called the open outcry system and it usually produces fair market pricing. In order to facilitate the exchange of stocks, the NYSE employs individuals called specialists who are assigned to manage the buying and selling of specific stocks and to buy those stocks when no one else will. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy
Wall Street trader's NYSE tour
 
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Filmed and edited by Ramón J. Goñi New York / BBC News http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/7688037.stm Teddy Weisberg, who has worked on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange for 40 years, gives us a tour of the exchange. In this video: Ramon J. Goni (videos | remove tag) Type a name: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/7688037.stm Teddy Weisberg, who has worked on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange for 40 years, gives us a tour of the exchange. Published on BBC NEWS (10/24/2008) Producer: Heather Alexander Shot & Edited: Ramón J. Goñi
Views: 164628 Ramón J. GOÑI SANTALLA
I SNUCK INTO NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE!
 
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I Just got back from my Trip to NYC! Where I got the chance to go to the New York Stock Exchange and explore. Talk about a humbling experience to be able to walk the floor of the the NYSE where so many legends in the Stock Market have also walked the same floors. Seeing it all in action and getting a first hand look was something I'll never forget. We also had a really awesome Youtube Subscriber meet up one night as well. To cap it all off SpeedTrader suprised me with Floor seats to the Brooklyn Nets basketball game. I'm beyond lucky to be able to have these types of opportunities to experience things I never dreamed of! Its trips like these that really motivate me to give back and make sure I'm always appreciative of all the good fortune that I've had in my life. Big THANK YOU to SpeedTrader for setting everything up! Don Hensley you're a legend brother. Get an amazing offer at SpeedTrader.com Broker by using this link! https://speedtrader.com/patrick/ Also a BIG THANK YOU to everyone who watches my videos everyday, who leave comments, and support this channel! With out you guys I would never be able to do these types of things. So I hope this video makes you laugh and you enjoy it.
Views: 8781 Patrick Wieland
Exclusive New York Stock Exchange Tour
 
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The New York Stock Exchange building in the Financial District is one of the most iconic buildings in NYC. Located at 11 Wall Street, the historical site has been closed to the public ever since September 11, with only private meetings, bell-ringing events and school field trips allowed. However, we got an exclusive look inside. Watch to see the standout, historical items from the New York Stock Exchange. Read about the secret rooms inside the New York Stock Exchange: https://www.timeout.com/newyork/blog/the-new-york-stock-exchange-is-filled-with-historic-secrets-082117 We toured the building’s many conference rooms filled with historical items, snuck a peek at the invitation-only restaurant and hidden dining room next door, and admired the architecture of the board rooms that were there when it was founded in 1792. Standout items found inside the New York Stock Exchange building include the largest Fabergé piece in the world, a Led Zeppelin guitar, Andy Warhol art, a clock from 1867 and the Buttonwood Agreement, one of the oldest historical documents in the United States found outside Washington, D.C. There’s also an autograph wall signed by bell-ringers that’s hidden inside a hallway, and a map room that’s just full of, you guessed it, maps. Below all the history-filled rooms, there’s the trading floor—that’s where the stocks are traded. There’s also the iconic bell, the most famous item in the New York Stock Exchange. Currently, 36 media outlets film shows and live-stream from the trading floor, adding to the hustle and bustle. Even if you never get the chance to go inside the New York Stock Exchange, it’s worth visiting Wall Street to see the famous Charging Bull statue. It’s found in Bowling Green in the Financial District, and earlier this year, an artist unveiled the Fearless Girl statue directly across from it. See more nearby Financial District attractions: https://www.timeout.com/newyork/attractions/wall-street
Views: 8823 Time Out New York
Inside the New York Stock Exchange
 
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As U.S. stocks get hammered due to sliding oil prices, CBS Moneywatch's Jill Wagner joins CBSN from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange with the latest details.
Views: 1286 CBSN
The Stock Market Explained Simply: Finance and Investing Basics - Animated Film (1957)
 
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The New York Stock Exchange (sometimes referred to as "the Big Board") provides a means for buyers and sellers to trade shares of stock in companies registered for public trading. The NYSE is open for trading Monday through Friday from 9:30 am -- 4:00 pm ET, with the exception of holidays declared by the Exchange in advance. The NYSE trades in a continuous auction format, where traders can execute stock transactions on behalf of investors. They will gather around the appropriate post where a specialist broker, who is employed by an NYSE member firm (that is, he/she is not an employee of the New York Stock Exchange), acts as an auctioneer in an open outcry auction market environment to bring buyers and sellers together and to manage the actual auction. They do on occasion (approximately 10% of the time) facilitate the trades by committing their own capital and as a matter of course disseminate information to the crowd that helps to bring buyers and sellers together. The auction process moved toward automation in 1995 through the use of wireless hand held computers (HHC). The system enabled traders to receive and execute orders electronically via wireless transmission. On September 25, 1995, NYSE member Michael Einersen, who designed and developed this system, executed 1000 shares of IBM through this HHC ending a 203 year process of paper transactions and ushering in an era of automated trading. As of January 24, 2007, all NYSE stocks can be traded via its electronic hybrid market (except for a small group of very high-priced stocks). Customers can now send orders for immediate electronic execution, or route orders to the floor for trade in the auction market. In the first three months of 2007, in excess of 82% of all order volume was delivered to the floor electronically.[23] NYSE works with US regulators like the SEC and CFTC to coordinate risk management measures in the electronic trading environment through the implementation of mechanisms like circuit breakers and liquidity replenishment points.[24] Until 2005, the right to directly trade shares on the exchange was conferred upon owners of the 1366 "seats". The term comes from the fact that up until the 1870s NYSE members sat in chairs to trade. In 1868, the number of seats was fixed at 533, and this number was increased several times over the years. In 1953, the number of seats was set at 1,366. These seats were a sought-after commodity as they conferred the ability to directly trade stock on the NYSE, and seat holders were commonly referred to as members of the NYSE. The Barnes family is the only known lineage to have five generations of NYSE members: Winthrop H. Barnes (admitted 1894), Richard W.P. Barnes (admitted 1926), Richard S. Barnes (admitted 1951), Robert H. Barnes (admitted 1972), Derek J. Barnes (admitted 2003). Seat prices varied widely over the years, generally falling during recessions and rising during economic expansions. The most expensive inflation-adjusted seat was sold in 1929 for $625,000, which, today, would be over six million dollars. In recent times, seats have sold for as high as $4 million in the late 1990s and as low as $1 million in 2001. In 2005, seat prices shot up to $3.25 million as the exchange entered into an agreement to merge with Archipelago and become a for-profit, publicly traded company. Seat owners received $500,000 in cash per seat and 77,000 shares of the newly formed corporation. The NYSE now sells one-year licenses to trade directly on the exchange. Licences for floor trading are available for $40,000 and a licence for bond trading is available for as little as $1,000 as of 2010.[25] Neither are resell-able, but may be transferable in during the change of ownership of a cooperation holding a trading licence. On February 15, 2011 NYSE and Deutsche Börse announced their merger to form a new company, as yet unnamed, wherein Deutsche Börse shareholders will have 60% ownership of the new entity, and NYSE Euronext shareholders will have 40%. On February 1, 2012, the European Commission blocked the merger of NYSE with Deutsche Börse, after commissioner Joaquin Almunia stated that the merger "would have led to a near-monopoly in European financial derivatives worldwide".[38] Instead, Deutsche Börse and NYSE will have to sell either their Eurex derivatives or LIFFE shares in order to not create a monopoly. On February 2, 2012, NYSE Euronext and Deutsche Börse agreed to scrap the merger.[39] In April 2011, IntercontinentalExchange (ICE), an American futures exchange, and NASDAQ OMX Group had together made an unsolicited proposal to buy NYSE Euronext for approximately US$11 billion, a deal in which NASDAQ would have taken control of the stock exchanges.[40] NYSE Euronext rejected this offer two times, but it was finally terminated after the United States Department of Justice indicated their intention to block the deal due to antitrust concerns. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Stock_Exchange
Views: 602955 The Film Archives
1970s American Stock Exchange, New York, 35mm
 
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From the Kinolibrary archive film collections. To order the clip clean and high res or to find out more visit http://www.kinolibrary.com. Clip ref. CH57 00:05:13 INT New York Stock Exchange, HA pan trading floor. Bankers at work. Awesome shots. Women secretaries at work punching numbers into machines, technology. Traders getting stressed out. Funny hand gestures. Stock brokers.
Views: 7161 thekinolibrary
Stock Market : History of the New York Stock Exchange
 
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The New York Stock Exchange began in 1792, with people exchanging certificates at a common meeting place for George Washington. Learn about the movement of the New York Stock Exchange over the years with help from a personal asset manager in this free video on investing in the stock market and money management. Expert: Roger Groh Bio: Roger Groh is the founder of Groh Asset Management. Filmmaker: Bing Hu
Views: 5084 ehowfinance
New York Stock Exchange: NYSE Nation's Market Place (1932) - CharlieDeanArchives / Archival Footage
 
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http://archive.org/details/0474_Nations_Market_Place_01_11_58_00 New York Stock Exchange . CharlieDeanArchives - Archive footage from the 20th century making history come alive!
What It's Like To Be The Youngest Woman Equity Trader In The New York Stock Exchange
 
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Lauren Simmons, an equity trader for Rosenblatt Securities, is the youngest woman to be a full-time broker in the New York Stock Exchange. She's only the second African-American female broker in the Exchange's 226-year history. According to a 2017 study by Stanford University, men comprise 75% of the wealth management field and fill more than 80% of leadership roles. ------------------------------------------------------ #StockExchange #LarenSimmons #BusinessInsider Business Insider tells you all you need to know about business, finance, tech, retail, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: https://read.bi/7XqUHI BI on Facebook: https://read.bi/2xOcEcj BI on Instagram: https://read.bi/2Q2D29T BI on Twitter: https://read.bi/2xCnzGF -------------------------------------------------- What It's Like To Be The Youngest Woman Equity Trader In The New York Stock Exchange
Views: 366017 Business Insider
New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in 1932: "The Nation's Market Place" 1932 Dynamic Pictures
 
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Support this channel: https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney Financial Classic Films playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLE7527E1C9F0B138B more at http://money.quickfound.net/ Explains the workings of the New York Stock Exchange as of 1932, in the midst of the Great Depression. Originally a public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Stock_Exchange Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is a stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street in Lower Manhattan, New York City, USA. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$13.39 trillion as of Dec 2010. Average daily trading value was approximately US$153 billion in 2008. The NYSE is operated by NYSE Euronext (NYSE: NYX), which was formed by the NYSE's 2007 merger with the fully electronic stock exchange Euronext. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of four rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building, located at 18 Broad Street, between the corners of Wall Street and Exchange Place, was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1978, as was the 11 Wall Street building. The origin of the NYSE can be traced to May 17, 1792, when the Buttonwood Agreement was signed by 24 stock brokers outside of 68 Wall Street in New York under a buttonwood tree on Wall Street. On March 8, 1817, the organization drafted a constitution and renamed itself the "New York Stock & Exchange Board." Anthony Stockholm was elected the Exchange's first president. The first central location of the Exchange was a room, rented in 1792 for $200 a month, located at 40 Wall Street. After that location was destroyed in the Great Fire of New York in 1835, the Exchange moved to a temporary headquarters. In 1863, the New York Stock & Exchange Board changed to its current name, the New York Stock Exchange. In 1865, the Exchange moved to 10--12 Broad Street. The New York Stock Exchange was closed for ten days starting September 20, 1873, because of the Panic of 1873. The volume of stocks traded increased sixfold in the years between 1896 and 1901, and a larger space was required to conduct business in the expanding marketplace. Eight New York City architects were invited to participate in a design competition for a new building; ultimately, the Exchange selected the neoclassic design submitted by architect George B. Post. Demolition of the Exchange building at 10 Broad Street, and adjacent buildings, started on May 10, 1901. The new building, located at 18 Broad Street, cost $4 million and opened on April 22, 1903. The trading floor, at 109 × 140 feet (33 × 42.5 m), was one of the largest volumes of space in the city at the time, and had a skylight set into a 72-foot (22 m)-high ceiling. The main façade of the building features six tall columns with Corinthian capitals, topped by a marble pediment containing high-relief sculptures by John Quincy Adams Ward with the collaboration of Paul Wayland Bartlett, carved by the Piccirilli Brothers, representing Integrity Protecting the Works of Man. The building was listed as a National Historic Landmark and added to the National Register of Historic Places on June 2, 1978...
Views: 1883 Jeff Quitney
1929 Wall Street Stock Market Crash
 
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The most devastating stock market crash in the history of the United States; Its from my favorite documentary by PBS - New York. This particular part about Wall Street crash of 1929 is from episode 5 of the series with title: Cosmopolis there are lots of archive photos, footages and drawings throughout the series and in my opinion it was great work done with finding them. series website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/newyork/series/index.html "Archival shoots took place at various historical and cultural institutions, including the New-York Historical Society, the Museum of the City of New York, and the Library of Congress, and focused on the filming of particularly rare or large-scale archival prints, lithographs, maps, and photographs"
Views: 758186 Orion602
1929 Stock Market Crash and the Great Depression - (Documentary)
 
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Brief History of that other economic designed crash of 1929 BBC documentary On October 29, 1929, Black Tuesday hit Wall Street as investors traded some 16 million shares on the New York Stock Exchange in a single day. Billions of dollars were lost, wiping out thousands of investors. In the aftermath of Black Tuesday, America and the rest of the industrialized world spiraled downward into the Great Depression (1929-39), the deepest and longest-lasting economic downturn in the history of the Western industrialized world up to that time. 1929 Stock Market Crash During the 1920s, the U.S. stock market underwent rapid expansion, reaching its peak in August 1929, after a period of wild speculation. By then, production had already declined and unemployment had risen, leaving stocks in great excess of their real value. Among the other causes of the eventual market collapse were low wages, the proliferation of debt, a struggling agricultural sector and an excess of large bank loans that could not be liquidated. Stock prices began to decline in September and early October 1929, and on October 18 the fall began. Panic set in, and on October 24, Black Thursday, a record 12,894,650 shares were traded. Investment companies and leading bankers attempted to stabilize the market by buying up great blocks of stock, producing a moderate rally on Friday. On Monday, however, the storm broke anew, and the market went into free fall. Black Monday was followed by Black Tuesday (October 29), in which stock prices collapsed completely and 16,410,030 shares were traded on the New York Stock Exchange in a single day. Billions of dollars were lost, wiping out thousands of investors, and stock tickers ran hours behind because the machinery could not handle the tremendous volume of trading. 1929 Stock Market Crash and the Great Depression After October 29, 1929, stock prices had nowhere to go but up, so there was considerable recovery during succeeding weeks. Overall, however, prices continued to drop as the United States slumped into the Great Depression, and by 1932 stocks were worth only about 20 percent of their value in the summer of 1929. The stock market crash of 1929 was not the sole cause of the Great Depression, but it did act to accelerate the global economic collapse of which it was also a symptom. By 1933, nearly half of America’s banks had failed, and unemployment was approaching 15 million people, or 30 percent of the workforce. Trading Strategies Live Trade Coaching Binary Options CFD's Futures Equities Commodities FX
Views: 11324 TradingCoachUK
The History of Stock Market Trading
 
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See more Tradenet Wiki videos here: https://www.tradenet.com/the-history-of-wall-street-day-trading/ The History of Stock Market Trading: Stock trading is documented in ancient writings as early as 400 B.C., but the most significant initial sale of stocks to the public occurred in Amsterdam in 1602 with the establishment of the Dutch East India Company as an international spice company. Over the years, additional public companies were established in Amsterdam, and stock trading took on an organizational nature. Some few years later in London, 1693, the first bonds began to be traded. Immediately afterward, several British companies began trading shares of their stock. London’s first stock traders operated in coffee shops on Change Street, adjacent to the Royal Exchange trading center. These early stock traders were not allowed to enter the Royal Exchange because of their known “bad habits.” In 1698, one John Casting, who liked to conduct business in Jonathan’s Coffee House, began hanging a list of stocks and their prices outside the coffee house. This list is considered the first milestone in establishing London’s stock exchange. Over the years to follow, several companies rose and fell, but the most widely known case was that of the South Sea Company, established in 1711 for the purpose of trade with South America. The company’s shares were snapped up, their price rocketing upward. Within a few years, it became apparent that expectations of successful trading with the New World were exaggerated, and in 1720 prices fell in one sudden drop, creating the first bubble burst in history. In 1789, stocks and bonds began to be traded in the United States. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe for NEW You Tube trading lesson here: https://youtube.com/user/TradenetGlobalUK?sub_confirmation=1 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Helpful links: Join my trading group: Get education & a Funded Account: http://www.tradenet.com/join-funded-accounts/?affiliate_id=35955&affiliate_org=2&web_page=&placement=&campaign_id=7010O000000fKjw Watch my FREE live You Tube streaming Trading Room: https://www.youtube.com/c/TradenetGlobalUK/live Join a FREE 14 day trial in my live Trading Room: https://www.tradenet.com/14-day-free-trial/?affiliate_id=35955&affiliate_org=2&web_page=&placement=&campaign_id=7010O000000fKjw Watch all my lessons here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLb9tmPwCEfFjZWiIEYa4BfF4BZX0F0mWz View the FREE "Part one" of my trading book "The Market Whisperer" here: http://books.tradenet.com/ Buy my best selling book at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1540353524 Open a Colmex account (Non-US residents): https://services.colmexpro.com/registration/start.aspx Watch all my day trading live videos at: http://www.youtube.com/user/TradenetGlobalUK/videos Contact Tradenet: [email protected] Contact Meir Barak: [email protected] Visit our website: www.tradenet.com Germany: www.tradenet.de
Stock Market: "What Makes Us Tick" 1952 New York Stock Exchange (NYSE)
 
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more at http://money.quickfound.net/ "Cartoon promoting the stock market as the engine of America's prosperity." Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound. Public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stock_market ...The purpose of a stock exchange is to facilitate the exchange of securities between buyers and sellers, thus providing a marketplace (virtual or real). The exchanges provide real-time trading information on the listed securities, facilitating price discovery. The New York Stock Exchange is a physical exchange, also referred to as a listed exchange -- only stocks listed with the exchange may be traded. Orders enter by way of exchange members and flow down to a floor broker, who goes to the floor trading post specialist for that stock to trade the order. The specialist's job is to match buy and sell orders using open outcry. If a spread exists, no trade immediately takes place—in this case the specialist should use his/her own resources (money or stock) to close the difference after his/her judged time. Once a trade has been made the details are reported on the "tape" and sent back to the brokerage firm, which then notifies the investor who placed the order. Although there is a significant amount of human contact in this process, computers play an important role, especially for so-called "program trading". The NASDAQ is a virtual listed exchange, where all of the trading is done over a computer network. The process is similar to the New York Stock Exchange. However, buyers and sellers are electronically matched. One or more NASDAQ market makers will always provide a bid and ask price at which they will always purchase or sell 'their' stock. The Paris Bourse, now part of Euronext, is an order-driven, electronic stock exchange. It was automated in the late 1980s. Prior to the 1980s, it consisted of an open outcry exchange. Stockbrokers met on the trading floor or the Palais Brongniart. In 1986, the CATS trading system was introduced, and the order matching process was fully automated. From time to time, active trading (especially in large blocks of securities) have moved away from the 'active' exchanges. Securities firms, led by UBS AG, Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and Credit Suisse Group, already steer 12 percent of U.S. security trades away from the exchanges to their internal systems. That share probably will increase to 18 percent by 2010 as more investment banks bypass the NYSE and NASDAQ and pair buyers and sellers of securities themselves, according to data compiled by Boston-based Aite Group LLC, a brokerage-industry consultant. Now that computers have eliminated the need for trading floors like the Big Board's, the balance of power in equity markets is shifting. By bringing more orders in-house, where clients can move big blocks of stock anonymously, brokers pay the exchanges less in fees and capture a bigger share of the $11 billion a year that institutional investors pay in trading commissions... In 12th century France the courratiers de change were concerned with managing and regulating the debts of agricultural communities on behalf of the banks. Because these men also traded with debts, they could be called the first brokers. A common misbelief is that in late 13th century Bruges commodity traders gathered inside the house of a man called Van der Beurze, and in 1309 they became the "Brugse Beurse", institutionalizing what had been, until then, an informal meeting, but actually, the family Van der Beurze had a building in Antwerp where those gatherings occurred; the Van der Beurze had Antwerp, as most of the merchants of that period, as their primary place for trading. The idea quickly spread... In the middle of the 13th century, Venetian bankers began to trade in government securities. In 1351 the Venetian government outlawed spreading rumors intended to lower the price of government funds. Bankers in Pisa, Verona, Genoa and Florence also began trading in government securities during the 14th century... Italian companies were also the first to issue shares. Companies in England and the Low Countries followed in the 16th century. The Dutch East India Company (founded in 1602) was the first joint-stock company to get a fixed capital stock and as a result, continuous trade in company stock emerged on the Amsterdam Exchange. Soon thereafter, a lively trade in various derivatives, among which options and repos, emerged on the Amsterdam market. Dutch traders also pioneered short selling...
Views: 1792 Jeff Quitney
New York Stock Exchange’s First Female President Starts Her First Day | TODAY
 
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In 226 years, the New York Stock Exchange has never had a female president before. But now Stacey Cunningham is making history on Wall Street. TODAY’s Savannah Guthrie catches up with her on her first day at work on the floor of the Exchange. » Subscribe to TODAY: http://on.today.com/SubscribeToTODAY » Watch the latest from TODAY: http://bit.ly/LatestTODAY About: TODAY brings you the latest headlines and expert tips on money, health and parenting. We wake up every morning to give you and your family all you need to start your day. If it matters to you, it matters to us. We are in the people business. Subscribe to our channel for exclusive TODAY archival footage & our original web series. Connect with TODAY Online! Visit TODAY's Website: http://on.today.com/ReadTODAY Find TODAY on Facebook: http://on.today.com/LikeTODAY Follow TODAY on Twitter: http://on.today.com/FollowTODAY Follow TODAY on Google+: http://on.today.com/PlusTODAY Follow TODAY on Instagram: http://on.today.com/InstaTODAY Follow TODAY on Pinterest: http://on.today.com/PinTODAY New York Stock Exchange’s First Female President Starts Her First Day | TODAY
Views: 1188 TODAY
PT2 THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE GOT ITS START WITH SLAVERY
 
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This is an overview on the wicked history behind the start of the New York Stock Exchange according to biblical prophecy
Views: 1566 gmsProphecySoup
History Of Bombay Stock Exchange! एक बरगद के पेड़ के नीचे से कैसे हुई शुरुआत
 
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The Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE) is an Indian stock exchange located at Dalal Street, Kala Ghoda, Mumbai (formerly Bombay), Maharashtra, India. Established in 1875, the BSE is Asia’s first stock exchange, It claims to be the world's fastest stock exchange, with a median trade speed of 6 microseconds,[3] The BSE is the world's 11th largest stock exchange with an overall market capitalization of more than $ 2 Trillion as of July, 2017. Subscribe Us for Latest News & Updates ►http://bit.ly/NMFNEWS Download the NMF News APP ► http://bit.ly/2gIeX6Y Stay Connected with Us : Facebook ► http://bit.ly/2hrPApV Tumblr ► http://bit.ly/2gIe1zq Blogger ► http://bit.ly/2grbqwa Music Credit: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100708 Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 22061 NMF News
Life inside the New York Stock Exchange 03-Apr-2008
 
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World markets have been reacting wildly to America's economic woes and the New York Stock Exchange is no exception.  The trading floor has been a frenetic hub of energy.  Ted Weisberg is a floor broker and says he can't imagine doing anything else.  This is his story in his own words.
Views: 57521 Al Jazeera English
How Does Floor Trading Work on the New York Stock Exchange - Wall Street Stock Market
 
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Floor trading is where traders or stockbrokers meet at a specific venue referred to as a trading floor or pit to buy and sell financial instruments using open outcry method to communicate with each other. More on stock trading: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=doc06-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=3b70391c913a3a0dc8e7add5852ad72a&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=books&keywords=stock%20trading These venues are typically stock exchanges or futures exchanges and transactions are executed by members of such an exchange using specific language or hand signals. During the 1980s and 1990s phone and electronic trading replaced physical floor trading in most exchanges around the world. As of 2007 few exchanges still have floor trading. One example is the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) which still executes a small percentage of its trades on the floor. That means that the traders actually form a group around the post on the floor of the market for the specialist, someone that works for one of the NYSE member firms and handles the stock. Just like in an auction, there are shouts coming from those that want to sell and those that want to buy. The specialist facilitates in the match and centralizing the trades. On January 24, 2007, the NYSE went from being strictly an auction market to a hybrid market that encompassed both the auction method and an electronic trading method that immediately makes the trade electronically. A small group of extremely high-priced stocks isn't on this trading system and is still auctioned on the trading floor. Even though over 82 percent of the trades take place electronically, the action on the floor of the stock exchange still has its place. While electronic trading is faster and provides for anonymity, there's more opportunity to improve the price of a share if it goes to the floor. Investors maintain the right to select the method they want to use. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floor_trading On October 19, 1987, the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) dropped 508 points, a 22.6% loss in a single day, the second-biggest one-day drop the exchange had experienced. Black Monday was followed by Terrible Tuesday, a day in which the Exchange's systems did not perform well and some people had difficulty completing their trades. Subsequently, there was another major drop for the Dow on October 13, 1989; the Mini-Crash of 1989. The crash was apparently caused by a reaction to a news story of a $6.75 billion leveraged buyout deal for UAL Corporation, the parent company of United Airlines, which broke down. When the UAL deal fell through, it helped trigger the collapse of the junk bond market causing the Dow to fall 190.58 points, or 6.91 percent. Similarly, there was a panic in the financial world during the year of 1997; the Asian Financial Crisis. Like the fall of many foreign markets, the Dow suffered a 7.18% drop in value (554.26 points) on October 27, 1997, in what later became known as the 1997 Mini-Crash but from which the DJIA recovered quickly. This was the first time that the "circuit breaker" rule had operated. On January 26, 2000, an altercation during filming of the music video for "Sleep Now in the Fire", which was directed by Michael Moore, caused the doors of the exchange to be closed and the band Rage Against the Machine to be escorted from the site by security[15] after band members attempted to gain entry into the exchange.[16] Trading on the exchange floor, however, continued uninterrupted.[17] In the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, the NYSE was closed for 4 trading sessions, one of the longest times the NYSE was closed for more than one session; only the third time since March 1933. On May 6, 2010, the Dow Jones Industrial Average posted its largest intraday percentage drop since the October 19, 1987 crash, with a 998 point loss later being called the 2010 Flash Crash (as the drop occurred in minutes before rebounding). The SEC and CFTC published a report on the event, although it did not come to a conclusion as to the cause. The regulators found no evidence that the fall was caused by erroneous ("fat finger") orders.[18] On October 29, 2012, the stock exchange was shut down for 2 days due to Hurricane Sandy.[19] The last time the stock exchange was closed due to weather for a full two days was on March 12 and 13 in 1888.[20] On May 1, 2014 the stock exchange was fined $4.5 million "to settle charges it violated market rules, the Securities and Exchange Commission said Thursday." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Stock_Exchange
Views: 122803 Remember This
The Stock Market Crash of 1987 | Cancel Crash
 
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The fragile state of today’s world financial markets is not a new phenomenon. It wasn’t long ago that the world braced itself for another Great Depression. It was the defining moment of the 1980's. The New York Stock Exchange, the epicenter of the world financial markets and backbone of American capitalism, was under siege. On October 19th, 1987, the Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged 508 points, the largest single day drop in the history of the stock market. But it was on Tuesday, October 20th that the world's financial markets came within 5 minutes of total disintegration. How was it averted? Was it a miracle? Manipulation? Or a lucky trade? Cancel Crash depicts the dramatic events that saved the world from financial anarchy and presents for the first time what actually happened on Terrible Tuesday. Framed between the opening bell on Friday, October 16h to the closing bell of Terrible Tuesday, the story unfolds as the perilous clock ticks, revealing those who prevented a global Depression and saved our financial markets. ======== tastytrade.com ======== Finally a financial network for traders, built by traders. Hosted by Tom Sosnoff and Tony Battista, tastytrade is a real financial network with 8 hours of live programming five days a week during market hours. From pop culture to advanced investment strategies, tastytrade has a broad spectrum of content for viewers of all kinds! Tune in and learn how to trade options successfully and make the most of your investments! Watch tastytrade LIVE daily Monday-Friday 7am-3:30pmCT: https://goo.gl/OTv3Ez Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/tastytrade1?sub_confirmation=1 Follow tastytrade: Twitter: https://twitter.com/tastytrade Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tastytrade LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/tastytrade Instagram: http://instagram.com/tastytrade Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/tastytrade/
Views: 289862 tastytrade
Trading Floor at New York Stock Exchange (NYSE)
 
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NYSE seen from the members gallery on August 9, 2007
Views: 278594 EH11937
New York Stock Exchange: Companies, Careers, Dow Jones, Futures, History (1991)
 
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William Henry Donaldson (born June 2, 1931) was the 27th Chairman of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), serving from February 2003 to June 2005. He served as Under Secretary of State for International Security Affairs in the Nixon Administration, as a special adviser to Vice President Nelson Rockefeller, Chairman and CEO of the New York Stock Exchange, and Chairman, President and CEO of Aetna. Donaldson founded Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette. Donaldson attended both Yale University (B.A. 1953) and Harvard University (M.B.A. 1958). While he was a senior at Yale, he joined its Skull and Bones secret society.[3][4] He began his career at G.H. Walker & Co..[5] He was Chairman of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace from 1999 to 2003. Donaldson returned to Yale and founded the Yale School of Management, where he served as dean and professor of management studies. The main building of the school continues to display a live size portrait of him and the premier leadership award at Yale School of Management is called "Donaldson Fellows". He also served in the United States Marine Corps.[6] Donaldson is a chartered financial analyst (CFA) charterholder and has received a number of honorary degrees. Donaldson is the father of three children and is married to Jane Phillips Donaldson. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_H._Donaldson On October 19, 1987, the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) dropped 508 points, a 22.6% loss in a single day, the second-biggest one-day drop the exchange had experienced. Black Monday was followed by Terrible Tuesday, a day in which the Exchange's systems did not perform well and some people had difficulty completing their trades. Subsequently, there was another major drop for the Dow on October 13, 1989—the Mini-Crash of 1989. The crash was apparently caused by a reaction to a news story of a $6.75 billion leveraged buyout deal for UAL Corporation, the parent company of United Airlines, which broke down. When the UAL deal fell through, it helped trigger the collapse of the junk bond market causing the Dow to fall 190.58 points, or 6.91 percent. Similarly, there was a panic in the financial world during the year of 1997; the Asian Financial Crisis. Like the fall of many foreign markets, the Dow suffered a 7.18% drop in value (554.26 points) on October 27, 1997, in what later became known as the 1997 Mini-Crash but from which the DJIA recovered quickly. This was the first time that the "circuit breaker" rule had operated. On January 26, 2000, an altercation during filming of the music video for "Sleep Now in the Fire", which was directed by Michael Moore, caused the doors of the exchange to be closed and the band Rage Against the Machine to be escorted from the site by security[19] after band members attempted to gain entry into the exchange. The video shoot had attracted several hundred people, according to a representative for the city’s Deputy Commissioner for Public Information.[20] New York City's film office does not allow weekday film shoots on Wall Street. Moore had permission to use the steps of Federal Hall but did not have a permit to shoot on the sidewalk or the street, nor did he have a loud-noise permit or the proper parking permits.[21] "Michael basically gave us one directorial instruction, "No matter what happens, don't stop playing," Tom Morello recalls. When the band left the steps, NYPD apprehended Moore and led him away. Moore yelled to the band, "Take the New York Stock Exchange!"[22] In an interview with the Socialist Worker, Morello said he and scores of others ran into the Stock Exchange. "About two hundred of us got through the first set of doors, but our charge was stopped when the Stock Exchange's titanium riot doors came crashing down."[23] "For a few minutes, Rage Against the Machine was able to shut down American capitalism," Moore said. "An act that I am sure tens of thousands of downsized citizens would cheer."[19] Trading on the exchange floor, however, continued uninterrupted. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Stock_Exchange
Views: 279 Way Back
Lauren Simmons discusses gender gap in finance, working at the NYSE
 
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Lauren Simmons is the only full time female trader on the floor of the New York stock exchange. At 23, she’s also its youngest. And she joins just one of two African-American women to sign the constitution of the exchange. CGTN's Karina Huber caught up with her at work and began by asking her how her degree in genetics with a minor in statistics helped her get to the exchange.
Views: 19391 CGTN America
Tense trading at NY Stock Exchange
 
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Trading was volatile on Friday on the New York Stock Exchange, as a better-than-expected US jobs report and hints of progress in Europe's debt crisis gave some relief after a steep sell-off a day earlier sent global markets in a nose dive. Views of traders and trading on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.Duration: 01:11
Views: 53627 AFP news agency
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 1952 ANIMATED PROMOTIONAL FILM "WHAT MAKES US TICK"  CARTOON 63674
 
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This promotional film about the New York Stock Exchange dates to the early 1960s and includes two segments. The first clip is titled Special Report: New York Stock Exchange Adds “Fair Ladies” To Staff. This about the women who provide tours and information of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). It opens with several different women welcoming people to the NYSE in various languages. During the World’s Fair, the NYSE is one of the most popular places to visit. A shot shows the floor of the NYSE (00:29); a woman gives speaks to her tour group. Exterior footage shows the intersection of Nassau Street and Broad Street (00:53). The second and primary film is a 1952 John Sutherland production, What Makes Us Tick. This short animated film explains how stocks work for potential investors, covering information on the corporation, stock holders, investment bankers, and the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). “John Q. Public” is interested in investing in stocks, so the film gives a good—if very positive—overview of how stocks function using an oil drum company as an example of how a business can become a corporation, attract investors and raise capital, be registered by the SEC, and ultimately be listed on the NYSE. The film concludes by telling viewers that investing in American industry creates jobs and allows for efficient war-time mobilization. The New York Stock Exchange (abbreviated as NYSE, and nicknamed "The Big Board"), is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$21.3 trillion as of June 2017. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 370 PeriscopeFilm
Huntingdon Life Sciences get kicked off of the New York Stock Exchange
 
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HLS are the only company in the history of the New York stock exchange to be delisted due to protest pressure. Here is the moment it happened.
Views: 2137 SHACtv
Who Started The New York Stock Exchange?
 
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What is the new york stock exchange? . A brief history of the new york stock exchange experience ruled 1792 2012 usa today. New york stock exchange resumes bond trading nov 28, 1914 new marketwatch topics. Wikipedia wiki new_york_stock_exchange url? Q webcache. S stocks are traded on the stock market and, this day in 1865, new york exchange opened its first permanent headquarters near wall street 1914, (nyse) reopens for bond trading after nearly four months, longest stoppage exchange's history altice has applied to list under symbol blue apron, which was founded 2012, posted net revenue of $795 million 3 nov 2015 before became as powerful it is today, started a group merchants meeting buttonwood tree. History of the ny stock exchange (business reference services new york (nyse) fxcm. Googleusercontent search. However the origin of new york stock exchange can be traced to may 17, 1792, when buttonwood agreement was signed by 24 also known as 'big board,' (nyse) created a merger nyse and archipelago holdings, which is fully electronic, in march, twenty four city's leading merchants met secretly merchant group, realizing that their now 20 dec 2012 venerable has been acquired from exchange's website, traces rich history 17 2017 foundation for one most important financial documents u. History of the ny stock exchange (business reference services new york wikipedia en. New york stock exchange united states american history. For most of the nyse's history, 24 apr 2017 when people talk stocks, they are usually talking about companies listed on (to skip history lesson and jump straight into current events, check out nyse wasn't first stock exchange in u. In 1792, nyse acquires its first traded securities. The present name was adopted in 1863. History of the ny stock exchange (business reference services new york wikipedia. The nyse was founded 17 may 1792 when 24 stockbrokers signed the buttonwood role of new york stock exchange in history united states america american has a long and colorful. The new york stock exchange the has a long history of shutdowns brief slide show encyclopedia britannicanew world. Read now see more 8 jul 2015 just after 11 32 am on wednesday, the new york stock exchange experienced an extremely rare halt in all trading. Originally known as 'curbstone brokers,' the ancestors of today's nyse mkt and amex bellthe exchange building upon pioneering spirit founder alexander hamilton for more than 230 years. This single paged document started the new york stock exchange market opened on wall street. Nyse history of the american stock exchange. In 1817, the constitution of new york stock and exchange board is adopted, it had also been established by brokers as a formal organization history begins with signing buttonwood agreement twenty four city stockbrokers merchants on may 17, 1792, outside at 68 wall street under tree. Nyse leadership cited an 21 dec 2012 the new york stock exchange, with its opening bell and floor traders, has been public image of a market for two centuries it was formally constituted as exchange board in 1817.
History of Economic Recessions in the United States: Stock Exchange (1991)
 
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NYSE MKT LLC, formerly known as the American Stock Exchange (AMEX), is an American stock exchange situated in New York City, New York. AMEX was previously a mutual organization, owned by its members. Until 1953, it was known as the New York Curb Exchange.[1] On January 17, 2008, NYSE Euronext announced it would acquire the AMEX for $260 million in stock; on October 1, 2008, NYSE Euronext completed the acquisition.[2] Before the closing of the acquisition, NYSE Euronext announced that the AMEX would be integrated with the Alternext European small-cap exchange and renamed the NYSE Alternext U.S.[3] In March 2009, NYSE Alternext U.S. was changed to NYSE Amex Equities. On May 10, 2012, NYSE Amex Equities changed its name to NYSE MKT LLC. These brokers often traded stocks that were speculative in nature. With the discovery of oil in the latter half of the 19th century, even oil stocks entered into the curb market. By 1865, following the American Civil War, stocks in small industrial companies, such as iron and steel, textiles and chemicals were first sold by curbstone brokers. Efforts to organize and standardize the market started early in the 20th century under Emanuel S. Mendels and Carl H. Pforzheimer [1]. In 1908, the New York Curb Market Agency was established, to codify trading practices. In 1911, the curbstone brokers came to be known as the New York Curb Market, which then had a formal constitution with brokerage and listing standards. After several years of outdoor trading, the curbstone brokers moved indoors in 1921 to New York Curb Exchange Building on Greenwich Street in Lower Manhattan. In 1929, the New York Curb Market changed its name to the New York Curb Exchange. Within no time, the Curb Exchange became the leading international stock market, listing more foreign issues than all other U.S. securities markets combined. In 1953 the Curb Exchange was renamed the American Stock Exchange. Paul Kolton was named as president of the exchange in 1971, making him the first person to be selected from within the exchange to serve as its leader, succeeding Ralph S. Saul, who announced his resignation in March 1971.[5][6] In November 1972, Kolton was named as the exchange's first chief executive officer and its first salaried top executive.[7] Kolton opposed the idea of a merger with the New York Stock Exchange while he headed the exchange saying that "two independent, viable exchanges are much more likely to be responsive to new pressures and public needs than a single institution".[6] Kolton announced in July 1977 that he would be leaving his position at the American Exchange in November of that year.[8] The American Stock Exchange merged with the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE Euronext) on October 1, 2008.[4] Post merger, the Amex equities business was branded "NYSE Alternext US". As part of the re-branding exercise, NYSE Alternext US was re-branded as NYSE Amex Equities.[4] On December 1, 2008, the Curb Exchange building at 86 Trinity Place was closed, and the Amex Equities trading floor was moved to the NYSE Trading floor at 11 Wall Street. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NYSE_MKT In a W-shaped recession, (also known as a double-dip recession), the economy falls into recession, recovers with a short period of growth, then falls back into recession before finally recovering, giving a "down up down up" pattern resembling the letter W. The early 1980s recession in the United States is cited as an example of a W-shaped recession. The National Bureau of Economic Research considers two recessions to have occurred in the early 1980s.[4] The economy fell into recession from January 1980 to July 1980, shrinking at an 8 percent annual rate from April to June 1980. The economy then entered a quick period of growth, and in the first three months of 1981 grew at an 8.4 percent annual rate. As the Federal Reserve under Paul Volcker raised interest rates to fight inflation, the economy dipped back into recession (hence, the "double dip") from July 1981 to November 1982. The economy then entered a period of mostly robust growth for the rest of the decade. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recession_shapes#W-shaped_recession
Views: 1531 Way Back
Secretary Clinton Rings Opening Bell at NY Stock Exchange
 
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U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton rings the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, New York, on September 9, 2011. [Go to http://www.state.gov/video for more video and text transcript.]
144. Introduciton to Trading on the New York Stock Exchange
 
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http://www.informedtrades.com/ The next lesson in my series on the logistics of stock trading, covering the history of the New York Stock Exchange, and how stocks are traded there.
Views: 10140 InformedTrades

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