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Protecting the Marine Environment
 
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Transcript NARRATOR: For nearly 200 years the US Coast Guard has been tasked with preserving our country's marine resources. That means tending to the oceans by protecting it from the castoffs of our human lives. The Guardians of our shores and Stewards of the Ocean ... with an ever-expanding role. The Coast Guard's work with protected species began in the late 1700's, when the agency ensured at-sea enforcement of laws governing the whaling and sealing industry. Over time, however, hunting, fishing, and whaling took their toll on the animal populations. To address this legacy, the Coast Guard took on new roles and adopted two strategic plans Ocean Steward and Ocean Guardian. Together these plans are the Coast Guard's framework for protecting vulnerable marine species and their habitats. You've probably seen pictures like these cold stunned turtles or lost manatees being loaded onto Coast Guard planes for a quick trip home to their natural habitats. During marine entanglements, the Coast Guard serves as the Nation's first responder, locating animals in jeopardy and, at times, assisting marine biologists at scenes like this where whales are caught up in fishing lines. Entanglement is a major issue for whales and many other types of marine life, like sea turtles. Discarded fishing gear, including huge commercial nets, can end up being a deadly trap for marine life. Marine debris and trash not only degrades our beaches, but also affect Marine Protected Areas and coral reefs beneath the waves. In the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale Sanctuary, Coast Guard's Operation Kohola Guardian protects endangered humpback whales in a variety of ways. Coast Guard crews conduct weekly sanctuary patrols to ensure both boaters and marine life stay safe, not only watching out for the whales but alerting boaters to their presence, as well. In the blue whales around Hawaii, the warm waters of coastal Florida or the cold green seas of New England or wherever human activity threatens marine ecosystems or protected species the Coast Guard is always ready to serve as America's Ocean Guardian.
Views: 2442 USCGSeaPartners
Can conservation save our ocean? | The Economist
 
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The ocean is facing its greatest ever challenge - overfishing, pollution and climate change are all threatening the health of a resource on which the whole world depends. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2G3TH9d The crew of this ship is on a mission to try and save one of the most endangered sea creatures on the planet. They’re in the middle of a marine protected area in Mexico - a conservation zone where certain types of fishing are banned. Local fishermen are poaching a species of fish that is so highly prized in China, they can make tens of thousands of dollars in just one night. With ocean life under threat from overfishing, pollution and climate change, could marine protected areas be the answer? Near the Mexican fishing town of San Felipe, on the The Upper Gulf of California... Conservation group, Sea Shepherd is working with the authorities to help enforce a Marine Protected Area - or MPA. A designated section of ocean to be conserved, managed and protected. Maintaining rich, diverse ecosystems is key for the health of the Ocean - and ultimately the survival of humanity. But ocean life is under threat. From plants to micro-organisms and animals, species are disappearing forever. Marine Biologist Patricia Gandolfo and the rest of the Sea Shepherd crew are here to stop poachers. Caught up in the nets of the criminal gangs and local fishermen is one particularly rare porpoise - the Vaquita. Worldwide there are thousands of sea species currently threatened with extinction. Losing just one species from the food chain can have a disastrous effect on an entire ecosystem. After it’s sold on, the Totoaba’s swim bladder can fetch up to $100,000 a kilo in China, where it’s prized for its medicinal properties. Critics disapprove of Sea Shepherds use of direct-action tactics in some of their campaigns, but in the Gulf of California, their presence is welcomed by the Mexican government. Globally, the fishing industry employs 260 million people, but many more subsistence fishermen depend on the ocean for their income. Local fisherman here claim protecting the ocean has limited how they can fish, destroying their way of life. Yet doing nothing may ultimately present more of a threat to their livelihoods. Currently Marine Protected Areas make up only 3.6% of the world’s ocean but a growing number of scientists are calling for 30% to be protected by 2030. Cabo Pulmo now has a thriving eco-tourism and diving industry. The environmental rewards provided by the MPA to the local community have been valued at millions of dollars a year - Far more than they ever made from fishing. The ocean is facing its greatest ever challenge - overfishing, pollution and climate change are all threatening the health of a resource on which the whole world depends. Marine protected areas can come in many forms. But if they are to be effective, they must align the need for conservation with the needs of those who depend on the ocean for survival. In order to avoid disaster–and to ensure a sustainable supply of fish for the future–far more of our ocean needs urgent protection. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2G4unAb Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2G3AV1E Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2G3TJOn Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2G5cEIU Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2G43hZY
Views: 63295 The Economist
Marine Pollution
 
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The ocean covers almost three quarters of our planet. Populations in coastal regions are growing and placing increasing pressure on coastal and marine ecosystems. Marine pollution of many kinds threatens the health of the ocean and its living resources. While the past decades have seen efforts at the local, national, and international levels to address the problems of marine pollution, more needs to be done. Learn more about marine pollution at www.state.gov/ourocean.
Views: 122958 U.S. Department of State
How We Can Keep Plastics Out of Our Ocean | National Geographic
 
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Plastic pollution poses one of the biggest known threats to the ocean, influencing all ecosystems from beautiful coral reefs to abyssal trenches, eventually accumulating in our own food. Learn more about how to upend the current system of produce-use-discard, and transition to a system which promotes reuse and repurposing of plastics. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe Learn more about Pristine Seas and National Geographic Society's other work to explore and protect the planet: http://nationalgeographic.org/ http://ocean.nationalgeographic.com/ocean/explore/pristine-seas/ About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta How We Can Keep Plastics Out of Our Ocean | National Geographic https://youtu.be/HQTUWK7CM-Y National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 1007914 National Geographic
Sources and impacts of marine litter by Jane Lee/ Marlisco
 
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Sources and impacts of marine litter by Jane Lee
Views: 41516 Marlisco
Protection and preservation of the marine environment
 
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The video "Protection and preservation of the marine environment" is the fifth video out of a series of six videos. The video describes the legal framework of the protection and preservation of the marine environment under the United Nations Convention for the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). The videos are produced in the context of the German Science Year 2016*17 - Seas and Oceans of the German Federal Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF). Further information may be found at: www.isrim.de/scienceyear.
Views: 848 ISRIM
Let's Learn the Ocean Zones!
 
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Learn about the three ocean zones with our ocean experts, Dr. Irene Stanella and her lab assistants Wyatt and Ned! ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/SciShow Or help support us by becoming our patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow SOURCES: http://www.kcedventures.com/blog/science-for-kids-under-the-sea-ocean-bottle http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/light_travel.html http://www.nhptv.org/natureworks/nwep6c.htm License Links Anglerfish: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Humpback_anglerfish.png Seal: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Monachus_schauinslandi.jpg Shrimp: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Heterocarpus_ensifer.jpg Hatchetfish: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Argyropelecus_aculeatus.jpg
Views: 223035 SciShow Kids
What Are Ocean Zones? | A Cartoon Crash Course
 
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To the naked eye, our oceans look like a huge, endless expanse of water. In actuality, they’re divided into zones and areas, similar to how land is segmented into countries and states. From your country’s shores to the lawless high seas, see how the vast global ocean is made up of smaller zones. Cartoonist Jim Toomey—whose daily comic strip, Sherman’s Lagoon, is syndicated in more than 250 newspapers in the United States—has joined forces with The Pew Charitable Trusts to illustrate "ocean zones" and other terms associated with our oceans. Watch the full ocean terms video series: http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/collections/2016/01/cartoon-crash-course-a-visual-glossary-of-ocean-terminology *TRANSCRIPT* To the naked eye, the ocean looks like a vast expanse of water, boundless in reach, and soul stirring in its mystery. The ocean is actually divided into zones and areas, sort of like how we’ve divvied up land into countries, states, and so forth. For starters, every coastal and island nation has an exclusive economic zone, or EEZ. That area of the sea and seabed that extends outward from the country’s shoreline, up to 200 nautical miles offshore. Each country has exclusive rights within its EEZ to exploit, conserve and manage the natural resources there – including marine life; minerals, gas and oil beneath the sea floor; and wind and hydrologic energy. Some countries subdivide their EEZs, into areas with special restrictions. For example, a zone where only smaller boats are allowed to fish, or marine reserve that’s closed to any activity that might disturb the plants and animals that live there. The area of ocean outside of all exclusive economic zones is called the high seas. It is often referred to as the commons because, technically, the high seas are a resource to be shared, managed and governed by everyone in the world. There’s no zoning commission for the high seas, and no signs to tell marine creatures that they’ve crossed that border. There’s not even a TSA security checkpoint! The United Nations does have a treaty, called the Law of the Sea, which sets some rules for what people can do out here… But it’s all very loosely governed. The high seas account for about two-thirds of the oceans, or about 98 million square miles, which means each of us can claim – let’s see, 7 billion into 98 million, carry the 2, convert the square miles – a nice little parcel of water in our real estate portfolios. Pewtrusts.org/highseas
Views: 25981 Pew
What is the strategic importance of Indian Ocean Region? learn its Geography, Trade & Strategic Imp.
 
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Support us on Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/Himfact Watch this video in Hindi - https://goo.gl/STrfzs In this report we will learn about factors that makes Indian Ocean Region significant. We will also focus on its geography, natural resources, trade and its strategic importance in the world. Soundtrack: Infados by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100449 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ Read More: Why the Indian Ocean matters? – The Diplomat http://thediplomat.com/2011/03/why-the-indian-ocean-matters/ Strategic Importance of Indian Ocean Region – USAW Military Studies Program Paper http://dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a192367.pdf The Indian Ocean Region – CSIS https://www.csis.org/analysis/indian-ocean-region India and Indian Ocean: A Briefing – IDSA http://www.idsa.in/idsanews/india-and-the-indian-ocean_skundu A Maritime's Strategy for India's growth – NIAS Discussions http://isssp.in/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Adarsh-EventReport.pdf World Oil Chokepoints – US Energy Information Administration https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=18991 Two chokepoints that threatened oil trade between the persian gulf and east asia – Forbes https://www.forbes.com/sites/johnmauldin/2017/04/17/2-choke-points-that-threaten-oil-trade-between-persian-gulf-and-east-asia/#5c6b304d4b96 These narrow chokepoint are critical to the world's oil trade – Business Insider http://www.businessinsider.in/These-8-narrow-chokepoints-are-critical-to-the-worlds-oil-trade/articleshow/46775193.cms World transit chokepoints critical to the global energy security – US Energy Information Administration https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=18991 Bab al-Mandab strait – Global Security http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/yemen/bab-al-mandab.htm Why are they so many military bases in Djibouti – BBC http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-33115502 Britain and US seek India’s assistance on Diego Garcia – Hindustan Times http://www.hindustantimes.com/world-news/britain-and-us-seek-india-s-assistance-on-diego-garcia/story-thHY7JObIZETj2zIQ73DwL.html FACTBOX – Malacca Strait is a strategic ‘chokepoint’ – Reuters http://in.reuters.com/article/idINIndia-46652220100304 Strait of Hormuz – Times http://time.com/piracy-southeast-asia-malacca-strait/ South China Sea is an important world energy trade route – US Energy Information Administration https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=10671 Seychelles committed to Indian naval base – The Hindu http://www.thehindu.com/news/international/seychelles-committed-to-indian-naval-base/article8022404.ece Two islands. Indian Ocean to soon be ‘India’s Ocean’ – DAWN https://www.dawn.com/news/1169104 Green nod for radar station at Narcodam in Andamans – The Times of India http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/environment/developmental-issues/Green-nod-for-radar-station-at-Narcondam-in-Andamans/articleshow/36411949.cms China seeks control of strategic port in Myanmar –The Maritime Executive http://www.maritime-executive.com/article/china-seeks-control-of-strategic-port-in-myanmar Under the Sea: Natural Resources in the Indian Ocean – STIMSON https://www.stimson.org/content/under-sea-natural-resources-indian-ocean-0 In a first, natural has hydrates discovered in the Indian Ocean. http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/energy-and-environment/In-a-first-natural-gas-hydrates-discovered-in-the-Indian-Ocean/article14509657.ece
Views: 88299 Himfact
Water Resources
 
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005 - Water Resources In this video Paul Andersen explains how water is unequally distributed around the globe through the hydrologic cycles. Seawater is everywhere but is not useful without costly desalination. Freshwater is divided between surface water and groundwater but must me stored and moved for domestic, industrial, and agricultural uses. Subsidized low cost water has created a problem with water conservation but economic changes could help solve the problem. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Intro Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License Outro Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: “Center Pivot Irrigation.” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, August 20, 2015. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Center_pivot_irrigation&oldid=677028017. “Desalination.” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, September 4, 2015. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Desalination&oldid=679383711. File:LevelBasinFloodIrrigation.JPG, n.d. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:LevelBasinFloodIrrigation.JPG. Hillewaert, Hans. English: Aquifer (vectorized), May 25, 2007. en:Image:Schematic aquifer xsection usgs cir1186.png. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Aquifer_en.svg. Ikluft. Aerial Photo of the California Aqueduct at the Interstate 205 Crossing, Just East of Interstate 580 Junction., September 11, 2007. Own work. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Kluft-Photo-Aerial-I205-California-Aqueduct-Img_0038.jpg. Kbh3rd. English: Map of Water-Level Changes in the High Plains/Ogallala Aquifer in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming, 1980 to 1995., February 27, 2009. Own work. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ogallala_changes_1980-1995.svg. moyogo, Water_Cycle_-_blank svg: *Wasserkreislauf png: de:Benutzer:Jooooderivative work: Water Cycle, SVG from Wasserkreislauf.png, November 13, 2011. Water_Cycle_-_blank.svg. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Water_Cycle-en.png. NCDC/NOAA, Michael Brewer. English: Status of Drought in California, October 21, 2014., October 23, 2014. http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/MapsAndData/MapArchive.aspx. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:California_Drought_Status_Oct_21_2014.png. “Ogallala Aquifer.” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, July 20, 2015. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ogallala_Aquifer&oldid=672198863. Plumbago. English: Annual Mean Sea Surface Salinity from the World Ocean Atlas 2009., December 5, 2012. Own work. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:WOA09_sea-surf_SAL_AYool.png. Rehman, Source file: Le Grand PortageDerivative work: English: The Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River, China., September 20, 2009. File:Three_Gorges_Dam,_Yangtze_River,_China.jpg. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:ThreeGorgesDam-China2009.jpg. Service, Photo by Jeff Vanuga, USDA Natural Resources Conservation. Level Furrow Irrigation on a Lettuce Field in Yuma, Az., October 4, 2011. USDA NRCS Photo Gallery: NRCSAZ02006.tif. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:NRCSAZ02006_-_Arizona_(295)(NRCS_Photo_Gallery).tif. Station, Castle Lake Limnological Research. Castle Lake, California, January 14, 2008. [1]. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Castlelake_1.jpg. Tomia. Hydroelectric Dam, December 30, 2007. Own work. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hydroelectric_dam.svg. USGS. English: Graph of the Locations of Water on Earth, [object HTMLTableCellElement]. http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/waterdistribution.html - traced and redrawn from File:Earth’s water distribution.gif. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Earth%27s_water_distribution.svg. version, Original uploader was Sagredo at en wikipedia Later. English: These Images Show the Yangtze River in the Vicinity of the Three Gorges Dam, September 29, 2007. Transferred from en.wikipedia; transferred to Commons by User:Rehman using CommonsHelper. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:ThreeGorgesDam-Landsat7.jpg. “WaterGAP.” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, April 22, 2014. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=WaterGAP&oldid=605287609. “Water in California.” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, August 31, 2015. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Water_in_California&oldid=678801793.
Views: 175095 Bozeman Science
How Much Plastic is in the Ocean?
 
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Viewers like you help make PBS (Thank you 😃) . Support your local PBS Member Station here: https://to.pbs.org/PBSDSDonate What can you do to make the oceans plastic-free? (HINT: Hitting the subscribe button uses zero plastic) ↓↓↓Check the resources below ↓↓↓ Ocean plastic pollution is a massive environmental problem. Millions of tons of plastic waste enter the ocean every year, even plastic that goes in the trash can often ends up in the sea! This week we learn about the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and look at the dangers ocean plastic poses to ocean animals. Plus, a few tips for you to reduce your own plastic use! Plastic Oceans Foundation: http://www.plasticoceans.org/ United Nations “Clean Seas” program: http://www.cleanseas.org/ The 5 Gyres Institute: https://www.5gyres.org/ Lonely Whale Foundation: https://www.lonelywhale.org/ Take this quiz to learn about your plastic impact: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/science/bottled-water-or-tap.html 10 ways to reduce plastic pollution: https://www.nrdc.org/stories/10-ways-reduce-plastic-pollution The no plastic straw pledge: http://www.plasticpollutioncoalition.org/no-straw-please/ Ocean plastic pollution resources from Monterey Bay Aquarium: https://www.montereybayaquarium.org/conservation-and-science/our-priorities/ocean-plastic-pollution What will it take to get plastic out of the ocean? https://ensia.com/features/what-will-it-take-to-get-plastics-out-of-the-ocean/ Resources for teachers: https://www.montereybayaquarium.org/education/teacher-professional-development/ocean-plastic-pollution-summit ----------- REFERENCES: Cózar, Andrés, et al. "Plastic debris in the open ocean." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 111.28 (2014): 10239-10244. Jamieson, Alan J., et al. "Bioaccumulation of persistent organic pollutants in the deepest ocean fauna." Nature Ecology & Evolution 1 (2017): 0051. Jambeck, Jenna R., et al. "Plastic waste inputs from land into the ocean." Science 347.6223 (2015): 768-771. “Moby-Duck” by Donovan Hohn (Harper’s Magazine) http://harpers.org/archive/2007/01/moby-duck/?single=1 ----------- FOLLOW US: Merch: https://store.dftba.com/collections/its-okay-to-be-smart Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/itsokaytobesmart Twitter: @okaytobesmart @DrJoeHanson Tumblr: http://www.itsokaytobesmart.com Instagram: @DrJoeHanson Snapchat: YoDrJoe ----------- It’s Okay To Be Smart is hosted by Joe Hanson, Ph.D. Director: Joe Nicolosi Writer: Joe Hanson Producer/editor/animator: Andrew Matthews Producer: Stephanie Noone and Amanda Fox Produced by PBS Digital Studios Music via APM Stock images from Shutterstock http://www.shutterstock.com
Views: 918509 It's Okay To Be Smart
Environment and Ecology Lecture 9.1 - Marine Organisms
 
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Link for enrolling in the Crash Course for Prelims 2019 - Crash Course WITH Test Series - https://goo.gl/K2SGDe Crash Course WITHOUT Test Series - https://goo.gl/zLUcR3 Welcome to Sleepy Classes. Creating IAS from the grassroots of our nation. Our Aim - To provide Top Quality GS Coaching FREE. The classes of entire UPSC content are being uploaded regularly, so that you don't need to spend lakhs of your Rupees on coaching classes. Paid Product (Test Series) - Test Series With Video Explanations - https://courses.sleepyclasses.com/learn/PRELIMS-TEST-SERIES-2019---With-Video-Solutions-? Test Series without Video Explanations - https://courses.sleepyclasses.com/learn/PRELIMS-TEST-SERIES-2019---Without-Video-Solutions-? You can also donate - https://milaap.org/fundraisers/SleepyClasses We are also available at - https://sleepyclasses.com/ Android App. Telegram - t.me/SleepyClasses UPSC || UPSC Preparation || UPSC Interview || UPSC Syllabus 2018 || UPSC Topper Interview || UPSC preparation for beginners || UPSC Exam || UPSC 2018 || UPSC Syllabus 2017 || UPSC motivational videos || UPSC preparation in Hindi || UPSC preparation lectures || UPSC preparation without coaching || UPSC preparation for working professionals || UPSC preparation for beginners in hindi || UPSC preparation channel || Sociology || Sociology lectures in Hindi || Sociology Optional for UPSC || Sociology Optional ||Sociology Lecture for IAS || IAS preparation || Free IAS UPSC Tests || Free IAS UPSC Questions || #UPSC #IAS #CivilServices
Views: 7589 SleepyClasses
Best Ocean Life 2018: Amazing Underwater Marine Life Documentary 2018
 
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Best Ocean Life 2018: Amazing Underwater Marine Life Documentary 2018 is about the life in the oceans in coral reef documentary. Underwater Life in Our Oceans And Seas Documentary 2018 Please SUBSCRIBE & SHARE. Thanks.
Views: 295980 Newest Documentaries
Valuation of Ecosystem Services: Classes of Values
 
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This video is a part of Conservation Strategy Fund's collection of environmental economics lessons and was made possible thanks to the support of Jon Mellberg and family. This series is for people who want to learn - or review - the economics of conservation. The Valuation series will look at the process of estimating the value of an ecosystem. This video will look at the difference between indirect, direct, bequest, existence and option use and non-use values of ecosystem services. To follow this series, subscribe to our YouTube channel. For more information on these and other trainings from Conservation Strategy Fund, check out: http://www.conservation-strategy.org/. Previous videos in this series were made possible by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Marcia Brady Tucker Foundation.
Sustainable Oceans & Seas - Full Video
 
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S.O.S.! Can fishing actually lead to a healthier ecosystem? Saving our oceans & seas is important to all of us. A healthy ecosystem matters. But how can we best do that and balance the needs of humans as well? Thirty years ago, New Zealand’s fisheries – along with much of the rest of the world’s – were on the brink of disaster. Overfishing led to declining fish populations. Something had to change. The result? The Quota Management System, or QMS. Today commercial fishing off New Zealand provides fish for consumers worldwide, an excellent livelihood for fishers, and a stronger, healthier ocean and fish population. How does it work? Come to New Zealand with scholar Johan Norberg and find out! Educators can also get a free DVD version of the video, as well as access a full teacher’s guide and other teaching resources by creating a free account at http://www.izzit.org. Subject Areas: ■ Business/Family & Consumer Science ■ Economics ■ World History/Geography ■ Science & Technology Topics: ■ Environmental Issues ■ Fishing ■ Maori ■ New Zealand ■ Oceans & Seas ■ Quota Management System ■ Sustainability ■ Tragedy of the Commons Want more great FREE educational stuff to go with this video? Head over to http://www.izzit.org and grab the full teacher’s guide, use the online quizzes, find additional educational resources and more! Check out our Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/izzit Visit our other educational programs here: http://www.izzit.org/products/index.php Make sure you enroll as an izzit.org member to receive your FREE teacher resources, click here to sign up now: http://www.izzit.org/join/index.php You can Tweet at us here: https://twitter.com/izzit_org Find us on Pinterest here: https://www.pinterest.com/izzitorg
Views: 7704 izzitEDU
Sustainable ocean management -- back to the future in Micronesia | Nicole Crane | TEDxSantaCruz
 
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Nicole Crane is a faculty member in the Biology Department at Cabrillo College in Aptos, California. She is also a Senior Conservation Scientist at the Oceanic Society, and is the Project Leader for the Ulithi Marine Management and Conservation Project -- focusing on outer island communities to help with sustainable management planning. Crane has more than 20 years experience working with communities and conducting ecological assessments of reefs. She is dedicated to linking rigorous science with cultural knowledge and community leadership in conservation. Nicole has established several science education programs in the United States, with a focus on serving underrepresented students. She was the founder and PI of the National Science Foundation Center for Excellence in Marine Advanced Technology Education (Monterey Peninsula College), and PI for Camp SEA Lab (California State University Monterey Bay). She was nominated for a PEW fellowship, and is a Fellow National at the Explorers Club. http://www.cabrillo.edu/~ncrane This TEDxSantaCruz talk is one of 22 surrounding our theme of "Activate" at the third full-day TEDxSantaCruz event held March 8, 2014 at the Hotel Paradox in Santa Cruz, CA. http://www.tedxsantacruz.org/ In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 5162 TEDx Talks
Research at Wageningen Marine Research
 
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IMARES (Institute for Marine Resources and Ecosystem Studies) is the Netherlands research institute established to provide the scientific support that is essential for developing policies and innovation in respect of the marine environment, fishery activities, aquaculture and the maritime sector. www.wageningenur.nl/en/imares
5 Human Impacts on the Environment: Crash Course Ecology #10
 
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Hank gives the run down on the top five ways humans are negatively impacting the environment and having detrimental effects on the valuable ecosystem services which a healthy biosphere provides. Like Crash Course? http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Follow Crash Course! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse T*mbl Crash Course: http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Table of Contents Ecosystem Services 00:51 The Importance of Biodiversity 04:07 Deforestation 06:42 Desertification 06:49 Global Warming 07:59 Invasive Species 08:51 Overharvesting 09:20 Crash Course/SciShow videos referenced in this episode: Hydrologic and Carbon Cycles: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2D7hZpIYlCA Nitrogen and Phosphorus Cycles: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leHy-Y_8nRs Ecological Succession: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZKIHe2LDP8 Climate Change: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2Jxs7lR8ZI Invasive Species: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDOwTXobJ3k Food Shortage: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPLJP84xL9A References and image licenses for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-3n5P Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1214029 CrashCourse
The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth
 
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Watch the latest in the Ocean series - What sharks reveal about the state of the Ocean: https://youtu.be/6xz1mxppMhY The ocean covers 70% of our planet. The deep-sea floor is a realm that is largely unexplored, but cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to go deeper than ever before. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Beneath the waves is a mysterious world that takes up to 95% of Earth's living space. Only three people have ever reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean. The deep is a world without sunlight, of freezing temperatures, and immense pressure. It's remained largely unexplored until now. Cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to explore deeper than ever before. They are opening up a whole new world of potential benefits to humanity. The risks are great, but the rewards could be greater. From a vast wealth of resources to clues about the origins of life, the race is on to the final frontier The Okeanos Explorer, the American government state-of-the-art vessel, designed for every type of deep ocean exploration from discovering new species to investigating shipwrecks. On board, engineers and scientists come together to answer questions about the origins of life and human history. Today the Okeanos is on a mission to investigate the wreck of a World War one submarine. Engineer Bobby Moore is part of a team who has developed the technology for this type of mission. The “deep discover”, a remote operating vehicle is equipped with 20 powerful LED lights and designed to withstand the huge pressure four miles down. Equivalent to 50 jumbo jets stacked on top of a person While the crew of the Okeanos send robots to investigate the deep, some of their fellow scientists prefer a more hands-on approach. Doctor Greg stone is a world leading marine biologist with over 8,000 hours under the sea. He has been exploring the abyss in person for 30 years. The technology opening up the deep is also opening up opportunity. Not just to witness the diversity of life but to glimpse vast amounts of rare mineral resources. Some of the world's most valuable metals can be found deep under the waves. A discovery that has begun to pique the interest of the global mining industry. The boldest of mining companies are heading to the deep drawn by the allure of a new Gold Rush. But to exploit it they're also beating a path to another strange new world. In an industrial estate in the north of England, SMD is one of the world's leading manufacturers of remote underwater equipment. The industrial technology the company has developed has made mining possible several kilometers beneath the ocean surface. With an estimated 150 trillion dollars’ worth of gold alone, deep-sea mining has the potential to transform the global economy. With so much still to discover, mining in the deep ocean could have unknowable impact. It's not just life today that may need protecting; reaching the deep ocean might just allow researchers to answer some truly fundamental questions. Hydrothermal vents, hot springs on the ocean floor, are cracks in the Earth's crust. Some claim they could help scientists glimpse the origins of life itself. We might still be years away from unlocking the mysteries of the deep. Even with the latest technology, this kind of exploration is always challenging. As the crew of the Okeanos comes to terms with a scale of the challenge and the opportunity that lies beneath, what they and others discover could transform humanity's understanding of how to protect the ocean. It's the most hostile environment on earth, but the keys to our future may lie in the deep. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 2893633 The Economist
Here's How Much Plastic Trash Is Littering the Earth | National Geographic
 
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These plastic bottles illustrate how humans discard a shocking amount of plastic waste into the environment. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Underwater photographer Huai Su filmed a diver collecting an endless amount of plastic bottles that litter the seafloor off Xiaoliuqiu Island, Taiwan. This is just one shocking example of the astonishing amount of plastic that can pollute our environment. An estimated 6.3 billion metric tons of plastic waste has been generated, a new study found, and only 9% of that total is recycled. Most of it—79%—is in a landfill or escaped into the natural environment, and only 12% has been incinerated. Read "A Whopping 91% of Plastic Isn't Recycled." http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/plastic-produced-recycling-waste-ocean-trash-debris-environment/ Here's How Much Plastic Trash Is Littering the Earth | National Geographic https://youtu.be/jyLjUEOcLgg National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 147614 National Geographic
ShareBiotech | Simon Faulkner | Natural Products from Marine Environment
 
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3 Sep 2012; Athlone Institute of Technology hosted presentations concerning new technologies in Natural Products. The meeting was focused on SME members of the Natural Products Biotechnology sector in Ireland and sought to clearly identify company perceptions of deficits regarding partnerships, collaborations, access to core facilities, required skills, training and effective networking within Ireland, the Atlantic Region of the EU and beyond.
Views: 298 Sixsem
Exploring the Coral Reef: Learn about Oceans for Kids - FreeSchool
 
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https://patreon.com/freeschool - Help support more content like this! Come learn about the amazing creatures that inhabit the coral reefs and how to protect them! We'll see sharks and sea turtles, parrotfish, eels, octopus, clownfish, anemone and more in this fun, kid-friendly adventure full of facts about the coral reef. FreeSchool is great for kids! Have you ever wondered what coral is made of? Or where the sand on the beach comes from? Why don't clownfish get stung when they go in the sea anemone? Come find out! Subscribe to FreeSchool: https://www.youtube.com/user/watchfreeschool?sub_confirmation=1 Visit us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/watchFreeSchool Check our our companion channel, FreeSchool Mom! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTcEtHRQhqiCZIIb77LyDmA And our NEW channel for little ones, FreeSchool Early Birds! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3OV62x86XHwaqsxLsuy8dA Music: Jaunty Gumption, Music for Manatees, Sneaky Snitch, Call to Adventure, The Other Side of the Door, Hidden Agenda - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Views: 1802890 Free School
Planning for Change: Managing Marine and Coastal Resources in an Unstable World.
 
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"Climate change. It's no longer a scientific curiosity, but the overriding environmental issue of our time." So begins the short film, Planning for Change, which tells the story of climate change and the impacts it is expected to have on the estimated 40 million people who live in the coastal zone of the western Indian Ocean and who depend on its ecosystem goods and services. Planning for Change highlights the challenges policy-makers and managers must meet to safeguard these vital resources, which support bountiful commercial fisheries, vitally important artisanal fisheries, a thriving tourism industry, alternative livelihoods, such as aquaculture and, most importantly, the food security and wellbeing of their people. Solutions to these daunting challenges are suggested through the region-wide adoption of a Large Marine Ecosystem approach to management. Planning for Change has been created specifically for an audience of policy-developers and decision-makers and it invites these viewers to work together with the GEF/UNDP Agulhas and Somali Current Large Marine Ecosystems (ASCLME) Project in addressing the challenge posed by increasing environmental variability and climate change and to take a lead in forging a new Western Indian Ocean Sustainable Ecosystem Alliance (WIOSEA) to ensure sustainable management and economic benefits for all, far into the future.
Views: 2600 ASCLME
Marine Seismic Surveys and the Environment
 
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An important part of the management of Australia's marine resources is mapping the geology beneath the sea floor; as part of this work we must understand and mitigate associated environmental impacts. This multimedia product provides background information on marine seismic surveys and the environment, as well as Geoscience Australia's role in environmental mitigation and research. For further information visit http://www.ga.gov.au/about/projects/marine/marine-seismic-surveys-and-the-environment. About the data visualisation: The visualisation of the seismic survey process is representative of a seismic survey, and does not represent any particular survey performed by a particular party. It is not to scale, and is only intended to convey the basic concepts of marine seismic surveys. Production credits: Script: Robin Swindell, Neil Caldwell, Chantelle Farrar, Andrew Carroll, Rachel Przeslawski Production Management: Chantelle Farrar, Neil Caldwell Edit, Cinematography, Sound: Michael O’Rourke 3D Data Visualisation, Animation: Neil Caldwell, Julie Silec Broadcast Design: Julie Silec Scientific Advice: Andrew Carroll, Rachel Przeslawski, Merrie-Ellen Gunning http://www.ga.gov.au
Views: 964 GeoscienceAustralia
Coral Reef Ecosystems:  Human Impacts Pristine Reefs and Conservation Strategies
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) Understanding how humans impact marine ecosystems is crucial to developing successful conservation strategies that protect the health of our ocean. Discover how Scripps marine ecologist Jennifer Smith and her team are conducting research relevant to solving human-induced problems in environments ranging from coral reefs to the waters off our shores. Series: "Jeffrey B. Graham Perspectives on Ocean Science Lecture Series" [1/2015] [Science] [Show ID: 28675]
Discover Ifremer’s missions
 
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Ifremer, France’s national integrated marine science research institute, is a reference for knowledge on the marine environment and its resources. On the national, European and international levels, Ifremer is an instigator of coordinated research programmes and infrastructure development. For example, Ifremer now runs and operates the French Oceanographic Fleet. Ifremer produces knowledge and know-how on the marine environment, meeting the needs for research, for technological development and innovation, for current and future societal issues and for the sustainable harvesting of marine resources and the conservation of marine ecosystems.
Views: 35 Ifremer
Monitoring, Protecting and Building our Marine Environment
 
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The world's water drives our planet, and it's up to us to protect it. We seamlessly bring together our award-winning environmental science teams, our world-class geophysical mapping capabilities and our large-scale transportation design experience to support our clients where ever they need us to go. Together, we're supporting the monitoring, protection and infrastructure development of our global oceans.
Views: 3282 HDR
Malapascua takes measures to save marine environment
 
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It was a great weekend for Malapascua, as some government agencies and concerned environmental organizations came together in the name of environmental protection and marine resources conservation. Around 300 participants gathered for the coastal cleanup and beach forest planting along the shores of Malapascua last June 11. Over 700 seedlings were planted all over the island: 500 mangrove seedlings and 200 molave seedlings scattered. The Lowland Forest Management of PENRO emphasized the importance of the trees as windbreaks or as shoreline protection during storm surges. The activity was simultaneously held in the sitios of Guimbitayon, Lapus, Langob, Bool, Bakhaw, Kabatangan, Indonacion, Monteribio, Pasil, Tawigan, and Bario or the village proper of the island. Public, private sector collaboration _28A3248William Villaver, marine biologist of the Provincial Environment and Natural Resources Office headed the underwater assessment and cleanup in the coral reef stretch not far from the village. Along with the 15 volunteer divers from the Navy, Coast Guard, and SeaKnights, the underwater team retrieved an estimated 100 kilos of trash, mostly plastics, pipes, bottles, and paint cans. They also retrieved a “crown of thorns”, a starfish that eats corals. “Some corals are damaged, siguro ma-igo ni sila sa pangtukod sa mga boatman. Naay mga portion sa corals nga namatay kay natabunan sa mga sagbot,” said Villaver. According to TEDH Compass, a non-government organization in Malapascua represented by Mariela Giolicci Pesotic and Dani Bueno, about 1,000 kilos of trash were collected from the shoreline and around 200 kilos of marine debris were retrieved from the underwater in their cleanup activity last week. “The situation under the waters of Malapascua is an eye-opener for the locals and the tourists.” said Pesotic. Meanwhile, People and the Sea, a private organization also in the island, founded by Axelle Jorcin from France, have been actively collaborating with the Municipal Environment and Natural Resources Office in Daanbantayan. People and the Sea representative Judith Almonase said that they are looking forward to more partnerships with the Cebu Provincial Government for awareness activity in the island. The Provincial Environment and Natural Resources Office is up for a battle against threats to biological diversity and productivity of provincial marine waters. A forum organized by PENRO was attended by stakeholders, including the locals, resort owners, government agencies and non-government organizations who all restated their commitment of protecting marine resources. Implementation of laws _28A2999During the forum, issues and disagreements were also raised by the locals and resort owners. These problems include salt water intrusion, scarcity of safe-drinking water in the community and implementation of the environmental law. Barangay Captain Rex Novabos and some representatives of the different government offices in the Capitol identified possible resolutions and recommendations of the issues raised at the gathering. The forum also provided information of the importance of protecting and preserving the abundance of coral reefs in the provincial waters. Neneth Gulfan, representative of K-5 Rooms, shared that they are fully informed about waste segregation and composting but emphasized that the loophole is in the implementation of the penalties for violations. However, Novabos highlighted that ordinances should be strengthened and that the laws should not be selective. At present, the Philippines is included in the Coral Triangle that hosts a rich amount of marine life including the variety of coral species. Coming from its name, Coral Triangle is the geographical term of the triangular area composed of the Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Timor Leste and Solomon Islands. The wide deposit of reefs in the Philippine marine waters is the home of different types of fish reef but it is now on the brink of danger due to coral mining, illegal fishing practices using dynamite and chemicals, coastal developments and waste dumping.
Jamaica's Marine Environment before and After tourism
 
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it would be best if the video is muted
Views: 3000 Narcissobession
Human impacts on Biodiversity | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
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Biodiversity is the variety of life. There are thought to be 8.7 million species on planet Earth. And, as we saw in this video, biodiversity is of utmost importance to humans. The loss of one key species can have a detrimental impact on many levels; from other species of animals to plants to the physical environment, as shown by wolves. Human activities are reducing biodiversity. Our future depends upon maintaining a good level of biodiversity, and so we need to start taking measures to try and stop the reduction. In this video we are going to look at how humans are negatively impacting biodiversity. As the world population has grown from 1.5 billion in 1900 to nearly 7.5 billion people today, unsurprisingly the land use has changed. Habitats have been destroyed in favour of agriculture, forestry, fishing, urbanisation and manufacturing. Unsurprisingly, habitat loss has greatly reduced the species richness. Habitat fragmentation has also meant that populations have been split into smaller subunits, which then when faced with challenging circumstances have not been able to adapt and survive. After habitat loss, overharvesting has had a huge effect on biodiversity. Humans historically exploit plant and animal species for short-term profit. If a resource is profitable, we develop more efficient methods of harvesting it, inevitably depleting the resource. As is currently happening with fishing and logging. The exploited species then needs protection. The difficulty is that the demand then outstrips the supply, and so the resource value rises. This increases the incentive to extract the resource and leads to the final collapse of the population. As happened with whales, elephants, spotted cats, cod, tuna and many more species. Human activities are polluting the air and water. Toxic discharge into the water from industrial processes unsurprisingly has a negative effect on the local aquatic species by killing, weakening or affecting their ability to reproduce. Phosphorous and nitrogen in fertilisers run-off agricultural fields and pass into rivers. These surplus nutrients cause algae to bloom, which then starves other aquatic species of oxygen and light, causing them to die. Acid rain is one consequence of humans polluting the air. This causes lakes and water bodies to become more acidic, killing off fish, molluscs, amphibians and many other species. Huge impact humans have had on planet Earth is the introduction of alien species to habitats. In fact, it is estimated that on any given day there are 3000 species in transit aboard ocean-going vessels! Alien species can cause problems in a number of ways… pause the video and have a look. Throughout the earth’s history there have been periods of rapid climate change, that have led to mass extinction events. We are currently in a period of fluctuating climate, but nearly all scientists agree that human activities, like burning fossil fuels, are speeding up global warming. We don’t know how much climate change is going to affect biodiversity in future, but it’s predicted to be huge. Loss of sea ice and ocean acidification are already causing huge reductions in biodiversity. Climate change alters temperature and weather patterns, with changing patterns of rainfall and drought expected to have significant impacts on biodiversity. So there we have a selection of human-related impacts on biodiversity. There are much more, which a quick search on the internet will bring up. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Save Our Marine Environment
 
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http://www.tgeg.asia Join TGEG in saving our environment. If our forests are essential to our socio-economic development it is the same way with our coastal areas. This is actually the main reason why it's important to conserve our marine environment while we still can. In Asia and Pacific regions most communities depend on the coastal resources thus making some of these areas over exploited which threatened the rich biodiversity in these areas. Some of the reasons of this degradation of coastal areas include over exploitation, destructive fishing and conversion of marine environment into eco-tourism projects and aquaculture. The saddening effects of these destructive activities have greatly contributed to the reduction of mangroves and coral reefs which lead to loss of fisheries productivity and biodiversity such as the threat to our endangered migratory species. Moreover, in Southeast Asia where most of world's mapped reefs are located has been assessed to have high potential of threat from disturbance due to various destructive activities in the area. According to a study about 80% of Southeast Asian reefs particularly in the Philippines and Indonesia are at risk while half are at high risk. Many organizations are now improving and protecting the coastal areas in Asia and the Pacific to prevent further impact to human survival. It is not yet too late to take part of this responsibility as a resident of this planet earth. Conserve what's left with our marine environment not only for our future generations but for our own survival. Let's join True Green Energy Group in saving our environment. For more information visit www.tgeg.asia
Views: 2085 TheTGEGAsia
OCEANA Pushes Best Practices for Sustainable Marine Environment
 
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For the latest news across Belize, visit: http://edition.channel5belize.com/ At the next meeting of the House in mid-October, a bill will be introduced on the indefinite moratorium against offshore oil exploration activity. The content has not been circulated and it is highly anticipated by environmentalists and conservationists. Over the weekend, OCEANA Belize Vice President Janelle Chanona pronounced at the Ocean Hero Awards ceremony that “Natural resources are not an environmental issue; they are a development issue especially in a country where the reality is that the poorer we become, the more dependent we become on our natural resources.” Chanona contends that with so many issues affecting Belizean waters, there is a need for best sustainable practices to be employed—whether it is a ban on offshore oil or the use of gillnets in the fisheries industry. Chanona also believes that the dialogue with regulatory agencies must continue.
Views: 47 Channel 5 Belize
Impact of Humans on the Marine Environment Part 1
 
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Recorded with http://screencast-o-matic.com
Views: 150 Dave Cox
UN #CleanSeas campaign aims to combat marine plastic litter
 
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UN Environment's Petter Malvik told UN News over 8 million tons of plastic end up in oceans each year. The UN will convene the Ocean Conference in June to spur international action to safeguard oceans, seas and marine resources. Footage Courtesy: UNEP
Views: 6417 United Nations
Protecting the Marine Environment
 
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For nearly 200 years the US Coast Guard has been tasked with preserving our country's marine resources. That means tending to the oceans by protecting it from the castoffs of our human lives. The Guardians of our shores and Stewards of the Ocean ... with an ever-expanding role. The Coast Guard's work with protected species began in the late 1700's, when the agency ensured at-sea enforcement of laws governing the whaling and sealing industry. Over time, however, hunting, fishing, and whaling took their toll on the animal populations. To address this legacy, the Coast Guard took on new roles and adopted two strategic plans Ocean Steward and Ocean Guardian. Together these plans are the Coast Guard's framework for protecting vulnerable marine species and their habitats. You've probably seen pictures like these cold stunned turtles or lost manatees being loaded onto Coast Guard planes for a quick trip home to their natural habitats. During marine entanglements, the Coast Guard serves as the Nation's first responder, locating animals in jeopardy and, at times, assisting marine biologists at scenes like this where whales are caught up in fishing lines. Entanglement is a major issue for whales and many other types of marine life, like sea turtles. Discarded fishing gear, including huge commercial nets, can end up being a deadly trap for marine life. Marine debris and trash not only degrades our beaches, but also affect Marine Protected Areas and coral reefs beneath the waves. In the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale Sanctuary, Coast Guard's Operation Kohola Guardian protects endangered humpback whales in a variety of ways. Coast Guard crews conduct weekly sanctuary patrols to ensure both boaters and marine life stay safe, not only watching out for the whales but alerting boaters to their presence, as well. In the blue whales around Hawaii, the warm waters of coastal Florida or the cold green seas of New England or wherever human activity threatens marine ecosystems or protected species the Coast Guard is always ready to serve as America's Ocean Guardian. Links/Credits: U.S. Coast Guard: http://www.uscg.mil/
Views: 174 SciTech .FliX
Seven surprising results from the reduction of Arctic Sea ice cover | David Barber | TEDxUManitoba
 
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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. It is now well known that sea ice in the Arctic has changed in both extent and thickness over the past several decades. In fact the change in sea ice is seen as one of the key global climate variables confirming model estimates of global scale warming of our planet through the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) process. Extensive investigations at the leading edge of Arctic System Science have recently uncovered a number of surprises, many somewhat counterintuitive, each having significant consequences in the Arctic and through teleconnections to the rest of our planet. In this talk I will review the rate and magnitude of change in sea ice, put this into the context of our understanding of the ‘natural variability’ in sea ice over the past several thousand years. I will then review seven surprising impacts of this change: 1) increasing coverage of young ice significantly changes atmospheric chemistry; 2) more snow both preserves and destroys ice; 3) Polar bear habitat can actually improve in some areas while deteriorating in others; 4) match-mismatch timing in the marine ecosystem increases vulnerability; 5) uncertainty as to whether the Arctic ocean will increase or decrease in overall productivity is a key unknown; 6) evidence that ice hazards are actually increasing while the world marshals to increase development of Arctic resources; and 7) evidence that our recent cold winters are actually linked to our warming Arctic. Dr. Barber obtained his Bachelors and Masters from the University of Manitoba, and his Ph.D. from the University of Waterloo, Ontario. He was appointed to a faculty position at the University of Manitoba in 1993 and received a Canada Research Chair in Arctic System Science in 2002. He is currently Associate Dean (Research), CHR Faculty of Environment, Earth and Resources. Dr. Barber has extensive experience in the examination of the Arctic marine environment as a ‘system’, and the effect climate change has on this system. Dr. Barber has published over 200 articles in the peer-reviewed literature pertaining to sea ice, climate change and physical-biological coupling in the Arctic marine system. He led the largest International Polar Year project in the world, known as the Circumpolar Flaw Lead system study. He is recognized internationally through scientific leadership in large network programs such as NOW, CASES, ArcticNet, and the Canadian Research Icebreaker (Amundsen), as an invited member of several Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council national committees, international committees and invitations to national and international science meetings. Dr. Barber was instrumental in a national competition to bring a Canada Excellence Research Chair (CERC) to the University of Manitoba in the field of Arctic Geomicrobiology and Climate Change. As a member of the Centre for Earth Observation Science he leads a polar marine science group of over 100 people About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 83171 TEDx Talks
The Marine Resources Council
 
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For over 25 years, the Marine Resources Council (MRC) has focused on major issues involving the Indian River Lagoon including: flow from land drainage and its negative impact on estuarine productivity; loss of seagrasses and mangroves; coordinating local, state, or federal programs for the lagoon; and the need for public education to incorporate science into decision-making. Today, plans for use of the Indian River Lagoon resources are incorporated into the 6 counties' and 33 cities' comprehensive plans, in addition to state management policy. The state legislature now regularly addresses lagoon issues and has dedicated funding to the Lagoon. Also, through the direct efforts of the MRC, the Indian River Lagoon received national recognition in 1990 as a National Estuary of Significance by the EPA.
Views: 4996 profilesseries
Big Green Debate - Marine Environment
 
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The panel respond to questions about Scotland's marine environment, and the possibility of a Marine National Park.
Views: 289 scottishvotepods
Committee on Environment and Natural Resources (September 1, 2015)
 
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Agenda: P.S. Res. Nos. 73, 113, 150, 151, 168, 173, 221, 342, 506, 519, 596, 777, 780, 788, 846, 888, 1282, 1347, 1426, 1456, 1473, 1529 and 1535 – (Implementation of R.A. 9147 (Wildlife Resources Conservation and Protection Act) P.S. Res. No. 149 – Stranded Marine Mammals in the Country P.S. Res. No. 1371 – Boosting if Defenses Against Poachers P.S. Res. Nos. 109 and 720 – R.A. 7586 (NIPAS Act of 1992) P.S. Res. No. 1362 – National Greening Program P.S. Res. No. 1404 - Marine Pollution
EnviGuard: The European Collaborative Project to Protect Marine Environment
 
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The objective of the EnviGuard project is to develop an in situ device for the currently hard to measure man-made chemical contaminants and biohazards in marine environment. This device will be used as an early warning system to assess the good environmental status of the sea or aquacultures in compliance with the MSFD (Marine Strategy Framework Directive). This collaborative project has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7). BIOTEM will contribute to the EnviGuard project by generating high affinity and specific monoclonal antibodies against toxins and man-made pollutants.
Electro-Pulse fishing causing catastrophic damage to marine environment - Mike Hookem MEP
 
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http://www.ukipmeps.org | http://ukip.org/join • European Parliament, Strasbourg, 15 January 2018 • Mike HOOKEM MEP (Yorkshire & North Lincs), UK Independence Party (UKIP), Europe of Freedom and Direct Democracy (EFDD) group www.mike-hookem.org - @Mike_Hookem • Debate: Conservation of fishery resources and protection of marine ecosystems through technical measures - Report: Gabriel Mato (A8-0381/2017) Report on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the conservation of fishery resources and the protection of marine ecosystems through technical measures, amending Council Regulations (EC) No 1967/2006, (EC) No 1098/2007, (EC) No 1224/2009 and Regulations (EU) No 1343/2011 and (EU) No 1380/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council, and repealing Council Regulations (EC) No 894/97, (EC) No 850/98, (EC) No 2549/2000, (EC) No 254/2002, (EC) No 812/2004 and (EC) No 2187/2005 [COM(2016)0134 - C8-0117/2016 - 2016/0074(COD)] Committee on Fisheries ...................... • Video: EbS (European Parliament) .................................. EU Member States: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, United Kingdom
Views: 803 UKIP MEPs
The Grice Marine Laboratory -- College of Charleston
 
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The Grice Marine Laboratory of the College of Charleston houses graduate and undergraduate academic programs in marine biology. The lab supports teaching and research in evolutionary biology, marine biogeography, cellular and molecular biology, benthic ecology, immunology, microbial ecology, phytoplankton ecology, environmental physiology, fish systematics, and invertebrate zoology and other marine sciences. It provides essential academic programs, courses and associated laboratories, advising, and research training and participation for about 400 undergraduate majors and 55 graduate students. The laboratory is located at Fort Johnson on James Island, South Carolina, just 10 minutes from the College's main campus. Grice Marine Lab is an integral and equal player at the South Carolina Marine Resources Center at Fort Johnson, where it works cooperatively with the NOAA⁄NOS Laboratory, the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, the Marine Resources Research Institute of the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, and the Medical University of South Carolina's Graduate Program in Marine Biomedicine and Environmental Sciences. At Grice Marin Lab, you'll find classrooms, a computer lab, faculty research labs, the Green Teaching Garden, marine specimen collections, a traveling touch tank, a powder magazine, and more. Find out more at gricemarinelab.cofc.edu #Boundlesscofc
Views: 4849 College of Charleston
Bachelor of Science in Environment & Natural Resource Degree
 
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Do you want to make a difference to this world? … protect and manage our wildlife? …ensure that we have clean drinking water? … decide how to best mitigate environmental risks associated with industrial development? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then UNB’s Bachelor of Science in Environment and Natural Resources (BScENR) degree program is for you