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Fundamentals of Qualitative Research Methods: Interviews (Module 3)
 
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Qualitative research is a strategy for systematic collection, organization, and interpretation of phenomena that are difficult to measure quantitatively. Dr. Leslie Curry leads us through six modules covering essential topics in qualitative research, including what it is qualitative research and how to use the most common methods, in-depth interviews and focus groups. These videos are intended to enhance participants' capacity to conceptualize, design, and conduct qualitative research in the health sciences. Welcome to Module 3. Britten N. Qualitative research: Qualitative interviews and medical research. British Medical Journal 1995;311:251-253. Learn more about Dr. Leslie Curry http://publichealth.yale.edu/people/leslie_curry.profile Learn more about the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute http://ghli.yale.edu
Views: 95675 YaleUniversity
Qualitative analysis of interview data: A step-by-step guide
 
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The content applies to qualitative data analysis in general. Do not forget to share this Youtube link with your friends. The steps are also described in writing below (Click Show more): STEP 1, reading the transcripts 1.1. Browse through all transcripts, as a whole. 1.2. Make notes about your impressions. 1.3. Read the transcripts again, one by one. 1.4. Read very carefully, line by line. STEP 2, labeling relevant pieces 2.1. Label relevant words, phrases, sentences, or sections. 2.2. Labels can be about actions, activities, concepts, differences, opinions, processes, or whatever you think is relevant. 2.3. You might decide that something is relevant to code because: *it is repeated in several places; *the interviewee explicitly states that it is important; *you have read about something similar in reports, e.g. scientific articles; *it reminds you of a theory or a concept; *or for some other reason that you think is relevant. You can use preconceived theories and concepts, be open-minded, aim for a description of things that are superficial, or aim for a conceptualization of underlying patterns. It is all up to you. It is your study and your choice of methodology. You are the interpreter and these phenomena are highlighted because you consider them important. Just make sure that you tell your reader about your methodology, under the heading Method. Be unbiased, stay close to the data, i.e. the transcripts, and do not hesitate to code plenty of phenomena. You can have lots of codes, even hundreds. STEP 3, decide which codes are the most important, and create categories by bringing several codes together 3.1. Go through all the codes created in the previous step. Read them, with a pen in your hand. 3.2. You can create new codes by combining two or more codes. 3.3. You do not have to use all the codes that you created in the previous step. 3.4. In fact, many of these initial codes can now be dropped. 3.5. Keep the codes that you think are important and group them together in the way you want. 3.6. Create categories. (You can call them themes if you want.) 3.7. The categories do not have to be of the same type. They can be about objects, processes, differences, or whatever. 3.8. Be unbiased, creative and open-minded. 3.9. Your work now, compared to the previous steps, is on a more general, abstract level. You are conceptualizing your data. STEP 4, label categories and decide which are the most relevant and how they are connected to each other 4.1. Label the categories. Here are some examples: Adaptation (Category) Updating rulebook (sub-category) Changing schedule (sub-category) New routines (sub-category) Seeking information (Category) Talking to colleagues (sub-category) Reading journals (sub-category) Attending meetings (sub-category) Problem solving (Category) Locate and fix problems fast (sub-category) Quick alarm systems (sub-category) 4.2. Describe the connections between them. 4.3. The categories and the connections are the main result of your study. It is new knowledge about the world, from the perspective of the participants in your study. STEP 5, some options 5.1. Decide if there is a hierarchy among the categories. 5.2. Decide if one category is more important than the other. 5.3. Draw a figure to summarize your results. STEP 6, write up your results 6.1. Under the heading Results, describe the categories and how they are connected. Use a neutral voice, and do not interpret your results. 6.2. Under the heading Discussion, write out your interpretations and discuss your results. Interpret the results in light of, for example: *results from similar, previous studies published in relevant scientific journals; *theories or concepts from your field; *other relevant aspects. STEP 7 Ending remark Nb: it is also OK not to divide the data into segments. Narrative analysis of interview transcripts, for example, does not rely on the fragmentation of the interview data. (Narrative analysis is not discussed in this tutorial.) Further, I have assumed that your task is to make sense of a lot of unstructured data, i.e. that you have qualitative data in the form of interview transcripts. However, remember that most of the things I have said in this tutorial are basic, and also apply to qualitative analysis in general. You can use the steps described in this tutorial to analyze: *notes from participatory observations; *documents; *web pages; *or other types of qualitative data. STEP 8 Suggested reading Alan Bryman's book: 'Social Research Methods' published by Oxford University Press. Steinar Kvale's and Svend Brinkmann's book 'InterViews: Learning the Craft of Qualitative Research Interviewing' published by SAGE. Text and video (including audio) © Kent Löfgren, Sweden
Views: 794616 Kent Löfgren
Fundamentals of Qualitative Research Methods: Data Analysis (Module 5)
 
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Qualitative research is a strategy for systematic collection, organization, and interpretation of phenomena that are difficult to measure quantitatively. Dr. Leslie Curry leads us through six modules covering essential topics in qualitative research, including what it is qualitative research and how to use the most common methods, in-depth interviews and focus groups. These videos are intended to enhance participants' capacity to conceptualize, design, and conduct qualitative research in the health sciences. Welcome to Module 5. Bradley EH, Curry LA, Devers K. Qualitative data analysis for health services research: Developing taxonomy, themes, and theory. Health Services Research, 2007; 42(4):1758-1772. Learn more about Dr. Leslie Curry http://publichealth.yale.edu/people/leslie_curry.profile Learn more about the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute http://ghli.yale.edu
Views: 178175 YaleUniversity
Analysing your Interviews
 
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This video is part of the University of Southampton, Southampton Education School, Digital Media Resources http://www.southampton.ac.uk/education http://www.southampton.ac.uk/~sesvideo/
6 Tips for designing a semi-structured interview guide
 
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6 tips for designing a semi-structured interview guide So, you want to design a guide (or protocol) for your semi-structured interview, as part of your qualitative research project? This video shows you how to develop the right questions and ask them in right order, so you can get the information you need every time! GET YOUR FREE SEMI-STRUCTURED INTERVIEW TEMPLATE http://eepurl.com/diQf1P Recommended Reading https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0... If you found this video useful, please like the video. If you know others who would find this video useful - please share https://youtu.be/N_sKx9QQYLw Want to make a video like this? Please go to http://track.fiverr.com/visit/?bta=20... Video Transcript So, you want to design a guide for your semi-structured interview but not sure of the best way to do this? I will show you how to develop the right questions and ask them in the right order, so you can get the information you need every time! A semi-structured is a verbal exchange where one person (the interviewer) elicits information respectfully from another person (the interviewee/respondent) through a series of questions. It should feel like a good conversation. First remember the questions you develop rely very heavily on your knowledge of the topic. If you are researching a topic that you know well for example if you are a nurse researching patients experiences of taking medication, then you are in a good place. Whether you know something or nothing at all about the topic – always – always read the literature before developing your guide. Once you have read the literature and have a good grasp of topic – return to your research question and ask yourself – what information do I want to get from the semi-structured interview? Make a list of everything you want to find out using the semi-structured tool. (include list examples for white board text). Make sure that each item on the list only consists of one idea …questions asking about more than one thing can be unclear, confusing and introduce bias. Now you can start drafting your questions. Remember in qualitative research, our aim to get the respondents perspective so we must use open questions and never use leading questions. The first set of questions in your research guide must be broad questions that put the interviewee at ease and encourage them to give you their perspective for example - Tell me about experience of coming to this school. The middle section is where you pursue ideas in more depth and where you get the answers to your specific research questions. The interviewee is now at ease, feeling valued because you have listened to them. Now you may ask more detailed questions and use probes, to build on the respondents previous answers. For example, you mentioned that you like to coming to school because your teachers are very nice, what sort of things does your teacher do that makes you say they are nice? In the concluding section, here you can seek clarification for anything that is still unclear and also that take into account any theories you may be using in your research for example research has shown that boys learn differently from girls. In your school how do your teachers meet the different learning needs of boys and girls Let’s summarise 1. Make sure you are familiar with the topic – this helps you to ask relevant questions 2. Make a list of what information you want to get from the semi-structured interview – this helps you formulate questions that will provide an answer to your research questions 3. Start with broad open questions – this puts the interviewee at ease and encourages them to give you their perception
Interview as a method for qualitative research
 
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The qualitative research interview seeks to describe and the meanings of central themes in the life world of the subjects. The main task in interviewing is to understand the meaning of what the interviewees say. For a comprehensive presentation of this method, see Jaber F. Gubrium and James A. Holstein's (2002) "Handbook of Interview Research." For a deconstruction of subjectivity in the interview, see James A. Holstein and Jaber F. Gubrium (1995) "The Active Interview."-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your own animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 52792 adly hafidzin
How to do a research interview
 
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After a short introduction looking at Steinar Kvale's 10 criteria of a good interviewer, this video examines two interviews: one a short and rather poor attempt, the other a longer and much improved version. It is designed to help anyone learning how to undertake research interviews in the social sciences. In addition to the references mentioned in the video you might be interested in this text by colleagues of mine: King, N., & Horrocks, C. (2010). Interviews in Qualitative Research. London: Sage.
Views: 208761 Graham R Gibbs
Qualitative data analysis
 
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Views: 54440 Jeongeun Kim
Qualitative Data Analysis - Coding & Developing Themes
 
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This is a short practical guide to Qualitative Data Analysis
Views: 146866 James Woodall
Using In-Depth Interviews (IDIs) In Your Research: Qualitative Research Methods
 
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Wondering how to do a valid In-Depth Interview with subjects in your qualitative research project? We give you some tips. See our other modules on many related topics at Mod-U: https://modu.ssri.duke.edu
What makes a good interview? - Advanced qualitative methods
 
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In part 2 of a 6 part discussion, Fiona Holland and James Elander from the University of Derby discuss the elements that contribute to a good qualitative research project. To find out more visit http://www.derby.ac.uk/ehs
Views: 38812 University of Derby
Coding Part 2: Thematic coding
 
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Thematic coding is one of the most common forms of qualitative data analysis and it is found in grounded theory, several forms of phenomenological analysis and framework analysis. The analyst tries to identify themes, categories or classifications of the data. Passages of the data (commonly an interview transcript) are coded to the themes - that is the passages are tagged or marked with the name of the theme. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/
Views: 195649 Graham R Gibbs
How to Know You Are Coding Correctly: Qualitative Research Methods
 
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Coding your qualitative data, whether that is interview transcripts, surveys, video, or photographs, is a subjective process. So how can you know when you are doing it well? We give you some basic tips.
5.3 Unstructured, Semi-Structured and Structured Interviews
 
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If you are having troubles with your research paper, I might have a solution for you. My full course "Research Methods for Business Students" is available on Udemy. Here you can also submit YOUR questions to me and receive FEEDBACK ON YOUR PAPER! As you are my students, the course is only for 9.99 USD with following link: https://www.udemy.com/research-methods-for-business-students/?couponCode=RESEARCH_METHODS_1
Views: 44682 MeanThat
Implenting In-Depth Interviews (IDIs) Well: Qualitative Research Methods
 
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It can be a lot of work to run a valid In-Depth Interview to gather data for your research, so we provide some tips to help you make that process go more easily. See our other modules on many related topics at Mod-U: https://modu.ssri.duke.edu
Interview guide (Qualitative interviews #2)
 
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(SCROLL DOWN FOR ADDITIONAL RESOURCES) This video is the 2nd in the series on how to develop, conduct and analyse qualitative interviews, and I discuss designing an interview guide (or protocol). I also talk about types of interview questions, and which questions to ask/avoid. USEFUL RESOURCES: For general interview structure, go to episode 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_U52HgsWNew For tips how to act DURING the interview, go to episode 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0QLmii0wiwU My blog article on how to do interviews: https://drkriukow.com/how-to-do-interviews/ USEFUL RESOURCES: King, N. & Horrocks, Ch. (2010). Interviews in Qualitative Research. London: Sage Publications. Kvale S. (1996). Interviews: An Introduction to Qualitative Research Interviews. Sage Publications, California. Robson, C. (2002). Real world research: a resource for social scientists and practitioner-researchers. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishers. My FB page - https://www.facebook.com/QualitativeResearcher/ Website - www.drkriukow.com My self-study course "How to analyse Qualitative data" - https://www.udemy.com/how-to-analyse-qualitative-data/?couponCode=REGULAR IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, FEEL FREE TO ASK ME IN THE COMMENTS! :) Best Dr K
Coding Part 1: Alan Bryman's 4 Stages of qualitative analysis
 
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An overview of the process of qualitative data analysis based on Alan Bryman's four stages of analysis. Reference Bryman, A (2001) Social Research Methods, Oxford: Oxford University Press This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/
Views: 206780 Graham R Gibbs
What Does Coding Looks Like?: Qualitative Research Methods
 
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You may be told that you need to "code" some qualitative data like interview transcripts, photos, or audio clips, but what does coding look like? We give you the basics. See our other modules on many related topics at Mod-U: https://modu.ssri.duke.edu
Fundamentals of Qualitative Research Methods: Focus Groups (Module 4)
 
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Qualitative research is a strategy for systematic collection, organization, and interpretation of phenomena that are difficult to measure quantitatively. Dr. Leslie Curry leads us through six modules covering essential topics in qualitative research, including what it is qualitative research and how to use the most common methods, in-depth interviews and focus groups. These videos are intended to enhance participants' capacity to conceptualize, design, and conduct qualitative research in the health sciences. Welcome to Module 4. Morgan D. Focus groups. Annual Review Sociology 1996;22:129-152. Learn more about Dr. Leslie Curry http://publichealth.yale.edu/people/leslie_curry.profile Learn more about the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute http://ghli.yale.edu
Views: 91377 YaleUniversity
6 Tips for analysing data from a semi-structured interview
 
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So, you have completed your semi-structured interview – well done you! I will show you how to analyse your interview data so you can produce meaningful answers to your research question every time. 1. After an interview, note down your thoughts. 2. Organise and store your audio recording and notes. 3. Transcribe your audio. 4. Read your transcript and identify themes. Give each theme a name – this process is called coding. You can do this manually or using software. Keep notes of why you have named the theme in a specific way. These notes are called memos 5. Repeat the process for other interviews and start to identify themes that recur across your interviews. 6. Combine themes to develop broader concepts Want more detail? Download the full presentation deck below If you found this video useful – please hit like and subscribe Institute for Development (IfD) Qualitative Research Specialists
Fundamentals of Qualitative Research Methods: What is Qualitative Research (Module 1)
 
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Qualitative research is a strategy for systematic collection, organization, and interpretation of phenomena that are difficult to measure quantitatively. Dr. Leslie Curry leads us through six modules covering essential topics in qualitative research, including what is qualitative research and how to use the most common methods, in-depth interviews and focus groups. These videos are intended to enhance participants' capacity to conceptualize, design, and conduct qualitative research in the health sciences. Welcome to module 1. Patton M. Qualitative Research and Evaluation Methods, 3rd edition. Sage Publishers; 2002. Curry L, Nembhard I, Bradley E. Qualitative and mixed methods provide unique contributions to outcomes research. Circulation, 2009;119:1442-1452. Crabtree, B. & Miller, W. (1999). Doing qualitative research, 2nd edition. Newbury Park, CA:Sage. Schensul S, Schensul J. and Lecompte M. 2012 Initiating Ethnographic research: A mixed Methods Approach, Altamira press. Learn more about Dr. Leslie Curry http://publichealth.yale.edu/people/leslie_curry.profile Learn more about the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute http://ghli.yale.edu
Views: 237838 YaleUniversity
Qualitative Sampling
 
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Who should you recruit for your qualitative research study? C'mon, let's go on a journey and find out!
Views: 67977 ChrisFlipp
Fundamentals of Qualitative Research Methods: Developing a Qualitative Research Question (Module 2)
 
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Qualitative research is a strategy for systematic collection, organization, and interpretation of phenomena that are difficult to measure quantitatively. Dr. Leslie Curry leads us through six modules covering essential topics in qualitative research, including what it is qualitative research and how to use the most common methods, in-depth interviews and focus groups. These videos are intended to enhance participants' capacity to conceptualize, design, and conduct qualitative research in the health sciences. Welcome to Module 2. Learn more about Dr. Leslie Curry http://publichealth.yale.edu/people/leslie_curry.profile Learn more about the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute http://ghli.yale.edu
Views: 107727 YaleUniversity
Qualitative Analysis: Coding and Categorizing Data by Philip Adu, Ph.D.
 
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Data analysis is all about data reduction. But how do you reduce data without losing the meaning? What is the coding process? What coding strategies can you use? How do you make sure the categories or themes address your research question(s)? How do you present your qualitative findings in a meaningful manner? If you want answers to these questions, watch this video. To access the PowerPoint slides, please go to:https://www.slideshare.net/kontorphilip/qualitative-analysis-coding-and-categorizing To buy Dr. Philip Adu's new book, 'A Step-by-Step Guide to Qualitative Data Coding', please go to Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/Step-Step-Guide-Qualitative-Coding/dp/1138486876/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1543874247&sr=8-3&keywords=Philip+adu)
Doing a transcription for qualitative research
 
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In this 16 minute video, Graham R Gibbs discusses some of the issues behind transcribing an interview or getting someone else to do it for you. PowerPoint files for the session are here: http://onlineqda.hud.ac.uk/movies/PowerPoints.php
Views: 33132 Graham R Gibbs
When to Stop Gathering Qualitative Data: Qualitative Research Methods
 
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How do you know when to stop when you are doing qualitative research and are gathering data through interviews, focus groups, or surveys? We give you some tips. See our other modules on many related topics at Mod-U: https://modu.ssri.duke.edu
Demo qualitative interview with mistakes
 
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Can you spot at least 10 mistakes made by this interviewer? Then watch her do the same interview again, correctly, in the next video and notice she gets different (and much more useful) answers. Interview from I-TECH www.go2tech.org - an amazing organisation that trains healthcare workers for resource poor countries.
Views: 91200 Joanna Chrzanowska
A Practical Guide to Qualitative Interviewing
 
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James gives practical hints and tips when conducting qualitative interviews, including how to design interview schedules and how to probe to maximize data collection.
Views: 2523 James Woodall
Better qualitative interview
 
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A better interview for comparison
Views: 11112 Erin C
Qualitative data analysis (Qualitative interviews #4)
 
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In this video (which is the 4th in my mini-series on qualitative interviews) I explain how to analyse qualitative data. As I explain, although it is not easy to talk about qualitative, or interview data analysis in terms of a framework, there are some guidelines for analysying qualitative data that can be applied most of the times. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: The blog article I mention: https://drkriukow.com/tips-on-how-to-unlock-your-data-analysis/ Discount (just 9.99) for my self-study course on Qualitative data analysis: https://www.udemy.com/how-to-analyse-qualitative-data/?couponCode=YTTRAILER
Introduction to Text Analysis with NVivo 11 for Windows
 
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It’s easy to get lost in a lot of text-based data. NVivo is qualitative data analysis software that provides structure to text, helping you quickly unlock insights and make something beautiful to share. http://www.qsrinternational.com
Views: 156258 NVivo by QSR
The Cycles of Coding: Qualitative Research Methods
 
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Coding is not something you do in a single pass. It is a process of going back to your data several times to find codes and patterns. We explain the basic procedure. See our other modules on many related topics at Mod-U: https://modu.ssri.duke.edu
Qualitative Data Collection
 
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Table of Contents: 00:00 - Qualitative Data Collection & Sampling Strategies 00:36 - How might you collect data for a qualitative study? 03:10 - Qualitative Interviews 07:34 - Tips for constructing interview questions 09:29 - Constructing good qualitative interview questions 15:22 - Tips for conducting effective interviews 19:42 - Focus groups 24:32 - Observation 28:01 - Documents 30:17 - Purposive sampling in qualitative research
Views: 25705 Molly Ott
Semi-structured interviewing for Participatory Action Research
 
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This video helps you to improve your interviewing skills. It contains practical tips as well as a real life example of a semistructured interview, from the slums of Kampala, Uganda. For more information about our work at 7Senses, check out our website: www.7sens.es. Here you can also subscribe to our newsletter, the 7Senses E-Zine.
Using semi-structured interviews in qualitative research
 
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Learn how to use semi-structured interviews effectively, and make sure they run smoothly! Practical tips to make sure you get rich qualitative data
Views: 94 Quirkos Software
Thematic Analysis Process
 
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Views: 110641 ProfCTimm
Celine Marie Pascale-Qualitative Textual Analysis of Interviews and Media
 
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Presentation by Dr. Celine-Marie Pascale, from American University, as part of the webinar series on qualitative methodology. Title: Qualitative Textual Analysis of Interviews and Media.
What is a Code?: Qualitative Research Methods
 
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In qualitative research, a "code" is the most basic building block. But what can a code look like, and how do you use it? We explain. See our other modules on many related topics at Mod-U: https://modu.ssri.duke.edu
How to Conduct a Qualitative Interview
 
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How to conduct an interview for qualitative data research in three steps.
Views: 388 Jerod Quinn
The analysis of narratives
 
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Examines the use of narratives in speech and in research analysis. Beginning with a look at the range of ways narratives might be analysed such as linguistic, structural and thematic. Attention is then turned to some of the functions of narrative. This was a lecture given to postgraduate (graduate) students at the University of Huddersfield as part of a course on Qualitative Data Analysis. To learn more about social research methods you might be interested in this new, inexpensive, postgraduate, distance learning course: MSc Social Research and Evaluation. The course is delivered entirely via the Internet. http://sre.hud.ac.uk/ Works referred to in the video include: Bury, M (2001) “Illness narratives: Fact or Fiction” Sociology of Health and Illness 23: 263-85 Cortazzi, M (1993) Narrative Analysis. London: Falmer Press. Denzin, N.K. (1989) Interpretive biography. Newbury Park, Calif., London: Sage. Labov, W. (1972) 'The transformation of experience in narrative syntax', in W. Labov (ed), Language in the inner city: Studies in the Black English vernacular. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. pp. 354-396. Lieblich, A., Tuval-Mashiach, R. and Zilber, T. (1998) Narrative Research: Reading, Analysis and Interpretation. London: Sage. Mishler, E.G. (1986) Research Interviewing: Context and Narrative, Cambridge Mass.: Havard University Press Rhodes, C., and Brown, A.D. (2005) “Narrative, Organizations and Research”, International Journal of Management Research, 5: 167-88. Riessman, C.K. (1993) Narrative Analysis. Newbury Park, CA, London: Sage. Credits: Sounds and music: 'Fifth Avenue Stroll' from iLife Sound Effects, http://images.apple.com/legal/sla/docs/ilife09.pdf Image: Freizeitanlage Kräwinklerbrücke, Kräwinklerbrücke in Remscheid by Frank Vincentz, Wikimedia Commons, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.
Views: 37959 Graham R Gibbs
Validity and reliability in Qualitative research (6 strategies to increase validity)
 
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What are validity and reliability in qualitative research? How to make sure (or provide evidence) that our study is valid and reliable? I answer these questions in the video. USEFUL RESOURCES: Breakwell, G. M. (2000). Interviewing. In Breakwell, G.M., Hammond, S. & Fife-Shaw, C. (eds.) Research Methods in Psychology. 2nd Ed. London: Sage. Buchbinder, E. (2011). Beyond Checking: Experiences of the Validation Interview. Qualitative Social Work, 10 (1), 106-122. Carlson, J.A. (2010). Avoiding Traps in Member Checking. The Qualitative Report, 15 (5), 1102-1113. Cohen, L., Manion, L., & Morrison, K. (2007). Research Methods in Education. 6th Ed. London: Routledge. Curtin, M., & Fossey, E. (2007). Appraising the trustworthiness of qualitative studies: Guidelines for occupational therapists. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 54, 88-94. Lincoln, Y. S. & Guba, E. G. (1985). Naturalistic Inquiry. Newbury Park, CA: SAGE. Robson, C. (2002). Real world research: a resource for social scientists and practitioner-researchers. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishers. Silverman, D. (1993) Interpreting Qualitative Data. London: Sage. Also: My FB page - https://www.facebook.com/QualitativeResearcher/ Website - www.drkriukow.com My self-study course "How to analyse Qualitative data" - https://www.udemy.com/how-to-analyse-qualitative-data/?couponCode=REGULAR IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, FEEL FREE TO ASK ME IN THE COMMENTS! :) Best Dr K
Demonstration Qualitative Interview - how it should be done
 
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Interviewer shows good quality of attention and listening, uses open questions and shows she values the answers, is aware respondent might be sensitive about admitting her needs, and guides her gently into offering realistic suggestions. Used with permission www.go2itech.org.
Views: 80306 Joanna Chrzanowska
Conducting Qualitative Analysis Using NVivo 11 (Part1) by Philip Adu, Ph.D.
 
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Manually analyzing qualitative data could be burdensome and time consuming. The introduction of user-friendly qualitative data analysis software such as NVivo has made analyzing qualitative data less stressful and more enjoyable. However, figuring out how to: import files, analyze data, create memos and annotations, organize cases and characteristics, and visualize and export findings turns out to be challenging to first-time-users of the NVivo software. With this webinar, Dr. Philip Adu presents a step-by-step process of analyzing qualitative data using NVivo software. To access the PowerPoint slides, please go to: https://www.slideshare.net/kontorphilip/conducting-qualitative-analysis-using-nvivo-a-quick-reference To buy Dr. Philip Adu's new book, 'A Step-by-Step Guide to Qualitative Data Coding', please go to Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/Step-Step-Guide-Qualitative-Coding/dp/1138486876/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1543874247&sr=8-3&keywords=Philip+adu)
When to Use Which UX Research Method
 
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Don’t just do usability tests. Do what you need. Consider 5 criteria to determine the most effective user-experience research method to use for your situation, to meet research goals, and achieve desired design outcomes. #UX #userresearch #usability #userexperienceresearch #methodology
Views: 26573 NNgroup