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Is Psychology a Science?
 
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Psychology research can be tricky, because brains are complicated. But does that mean it isn't a science? Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters—we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Kevin Bealer, Mark Terrio-Cameron, KatieMarie Magnone, Patrick Merrithew, Charles Southerland, Fatima Iqbal, Benny, Kyle Anderson, Tim Curwick, Scott Satovsky Jr, Will and Sonja Marple, Philippe von Bergen, Bella Nash, Bryce Daifuku, Chris Peters, Patrick D. Ashmore, Charles George, Bader AlGhamdi ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: http://www.gly.uga.edu/railsback/1122sciencedefns.html http://articles.latimes.com/2012/jul/13/news/la-ol-blowback-pscyhology-science-20120713 https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/under-the-influence/201308/the-psychology-the-psychology-isnt-science-argument https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/psysociety/psychology-8217-s-brilliant-beautiful-scientific-messiness/ http://www.apa.org/action/science/
Views: 143280 SciShow Psych
Why an Entire Field of Psychology Is in Trouble
 
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Learn why an entire field of Psychology is in trouble. Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Coda Buchanan, Lucy McGlasson, Accalia Elementia, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Saul, Kathy & Tim Philip, Kevin Bealer, Christopher Collins, Thomas J., charles george, Andreas Heydeck, Patrick D. Ashmore, Justin Lentz, Will and Sonja Marple, Ed Shelley, Chris Peters, Tim Curwick, Philippe von Bergen, Fatima Iqbal. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: https://faculty.washington.edu/jdb/345/345%20Articles/Baumeister%20et%20al.%20(1998).pdf http://www.simplypsychology.org/psyche.html https://www.apa.org/helpcenter/willpower-limited-resource.pdf http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/cover_story/2016/03/ego_depletion_an_influential_theory_in_psychology_may_have_just_been_debunked.html http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20876879?dopt=Abstract https://static1.squarespace.com/static/550b09eae4b0147d03eda40d/t/5525fa8de4b0788926c389cb/1428552333890/running-on-empty.pdf http://www.slate.com/articles/business/productivity/2014/10/decision_fatigue_ego_depletion_how_to_make_better_decisions.html http://www.uky.edu/~njdewa2/gailliotetal07JPSP.pdf http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2012/04/the-chocolate-and-radish-experiment-that-birthed-the-modern-conception-of-willpower/255544/ http://www.psychologicalscience.org/redesign/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Sripada-Kessler-Jonides-Commentary_final2-002.pdf http://www.psychologicalscience.org/redesign/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/RRR-comment-BaumeisterVohs-revised-March17-002.pdf http://www.vox.com/2016/3/22/11284528/explain-replication-crisis-psychology http://www.psy.miami.edu/ehblab/PubBiasSelfControlEgo.pdf
Views: 2275767 SciShow
Is Most Published Research Wrong?
 
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Mounting evidence suggests a lot of published research is false. Check out Audible: http://bit.ly/AudibleVe Support Veritasium on Patreon: http://bit.ly/VePatreon Patreon supporters: Bryan Baker, Donal Botkin, Tony Fadell, Jason Buster, Saeed Alghamdi More information on this topic: http://wke.lt/w/s/z0wmO The Preregistration Challenge: https://cos.io/prereg/ Resources used in the making of this video: Why Most Published Research Findings Are False: http://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.0020124 Trouble at the Lab: http://www.economist.com/news/briefing/21588057-scientists-think-science-self-correcting-alarming-degree-it-not-trouble Science isn't broken: http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/science-isnt-broken/#part1 Visual effects by Gustavo Rosa
Views: 2040484 Veritasium
Peer Review in 3 Minutes
 
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How do articles get peer reviewed? What role does peer review play in scholarly research and publication? This video will explain. This video is published under a Creative Commons 3.0 BY-NC-SA US license. License, credits, and contact information can be found here: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/tutorials/peerreview/ Feel free to link to / embed our videos!
Views: 288230 libncsu
How Restaurants Use Psychology to Make You Spend More Money
 
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Restaurants have a whole bucket-load of tricks up their sleeves to get you to spend more money. Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: Sam Lutfi, Kevin Knupp, Nicholas Smith, Inerri, D.A. Noe, alexander wadsworth, سلطان الخليفي, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Bella Nash, Charles Southerland, Bader AlGhamdi, James Harshaw, Patrick Merrithew, Patrick D. Ashmore, Candy, Tim Curwick, charles george, Saul, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Viraansh Bhanushali, Kevin Bealer, Philippe von Bergen, Chris Peters, Fatima Iqbal, Justin Lentz ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev.nutr.24.012003.132140 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0899900704001510 https://flavourjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13411-015-0046-9 http://scholarship.sha.cornell.edu/chrpubs/169/ http://www.le.ac.uk/press/ebulletin/news/havingtherighttaste.html http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1745-459X.2009.00267.x/abstract http://www.acrwebsite.org/search/view-conference-proceedings.aspx?Id=8588 http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/662615 https://foodpsychology.cornell.edu/discoveries/color-your-plates-matters http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.2466/pms.2002.94.2.671 https://academic.oup.com/jcr/article-abstract/30/3/455/1790637/Bottoms-Up-The-Influence-of-Elongation-on-Pouring http://www.mdpi.com/2306-5710/3/3/33/htm http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0950329314001542 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0043007 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0950329315000907 https://flavourjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13411-017-0052-1 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0950329317301192 https://flavourjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/2044-7248-1-12 https://flavourjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/2044-7248-1-7 https://cpl.revues.org/398 http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0013916506295574 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0950329311000966 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1745-459X.2011.00351.x/full https://flavourjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/2044-7248-3-4 https://www.psy.ox.ac.uk/publications/322876 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1038/oby.2005.12/full Images: https://flavourjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/2044-7248-3-7
Views: 1490411 SciShow Psych
Why Psychology is a Science
 
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A Psy.D. student discusses human factors, statistics, and policy issues about how and why psychology is absolutely a science and cannot function without it. Reference: Woods, D. L., Wyma, J. M., Yund, E. W., Herron, T. J., & Reed, B. (2015). Factors influencing the latency of simple reaction time. Frontiers in human neuroscience, 9, 131. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4374455/
Views: 2 Psychology Bee
The Science of Learning with Stress and Fear
 
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To support us visit http://www.patreon.com/sprouts The reason why we remember specific moments or movies is because they have been stored in our memory under the influence of emotions. When we win or fail, cry or celebrate, we learn fast, deep and plenty. But when we are afraid our brain limits our ability to think, for a good reason. Fear is an emotion induced when we face a threat to our physical or psychological well being. It causes a change in brain and organ functions and ultimately in our behavior first we get stressed or aggressive, then we are left with three final ways out: freeze, fight or flight. The reason for this is evolution. Over the last million years, we learn that when we meet a dangerous animal, we better freeze, fight or run and hide. To save our life this is now programmed in our genes. But something else happens. When it gets dangerous a specific region of our brain, the Amygdala, takes over. Its job is to protect us and save our life. To act fast it refrains us from thinking and leaves us only with those three options. This makes creative and critical thought processes impossible. High pressure triggers a similar response. In one experiment, German neuroscientist Prof. Dr. Huether measured the brain function of young men playing a car racing game. The race was on and the men eager to win. When the researchers later looked at the scans of the brain they saw shockingly little activity. In fact, the young men hardly used their brains at all and they certainly didnt remembered much. Later the researchers repeated the experiment. This time they did not play the game themselves but just watched from inside the car sitting next to the driver. Instead of focusing to win, they focused on a lot of other things: driving behavior, the race track, other cars. This time the brains showed lots of activity Learning happened and memories were created. The scientists concluded that when we panic at a math exam or when a salesmen fears to miss his monthly target, it can create a tunnel vision. Then our vision field becomes smaller, our learning limited and we cannot find the road to success. Next time when you are stressed to perform or when you panic during an exam, try this quick fix. First slowly breath in through your nose. To do it slow enough, count from one to five. Then breath out through your mouth, again counting to five. Repeat that for 1-5 minutes and your body will relax and your brain can switch from protection back to a learning mode. SOURCES: Manfred Spitzer about Cocain & Porsche Car: https://youtu.be/bv16azw2MVo?t=29m46s http://www.gerald-huether.de/content/international/audio_and_video/ http://www.id-factory.de/NEWSLETTER/Hirnforschung-ein-Interview-mit-Prof.-Dr.-Gerald-Huether-Neurobiologe https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fear_processing_in_the_brain http://www.stressstop.com/stress-tips/articles/fight-flight-or-freeze-response-to-stress.php https://www.welt.de/debatte/kommentare/article113327766/Jedes-Kind-lernt-gerne-aber-nur-ohne-Druck.html http://humanitiesinmedicine.org/manfred-spitzer/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bv16azw2MVo
Views: 66096 Sprouts
How to Write a Paper in a Weekend (By Prof. Pete Carr)
 
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In this video, Prof. Carr (faculty member at the University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry) is explaining the Algorithm of writing a paper in a weekend.
The Teenage Brain Explained
 
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Being a teenager is hard. Especially when hormones play their part in wreaking havoc on the teenage body and brain. In this episode, Hank explains what is happening to the during the angsty-time. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Thanks Tank Tumblr: http://thankstank.tumblr.com SOURCES http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/print/2011/10/teenage-brains/dobbs-text ** http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/new_scientist/2013/04/teenage_sleep_patterns_why_school_should_start_later.html http://www.livescience.com/11043-teens-hurt-science-injury.html http://www.livescience.com/12896-7-mind-body-aging.html http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/humanbody/body/articles/lifecycle/teenagers/sleep.shtml http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052970203806504577181351486558984 http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/teenbrain/view/ http://www.livescience.com/21461-teen-brain-adolescence-facts.html http://rendezvous.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/05/15/science-tackles-mystery-of-the-teenage-brain/ http://science.howstuffworks.com/life/teenage-brain.htm http://www.theguardian.com/science/2005/mar/03/1 http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/teenbrain/work/ http://www.newscientist.com/topic/teenagers http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21829130.100-why-teenagers-really-do-need-an-extra-hour-in-bed.html http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/12/061211124302.htm http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8381804 http://www.nature.com/jid/journal/v53/n1/full/jid1969100a.html
Views: 3510815 SciShow
Confidence: What Does It Do? | Richard Petty | TEDxOhioStateUniversity
 
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Confidence has become a buzzword and everyone wants to be confident. Dr. Richard Petty talks about what confidence actually is, and his research on the subject matter. Richard discusses that someone who is very confident is more likely to take action regardless of how good or how bad that idea/thought may be. Richard Petty is Distinguished University Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychology at The Ohio State University. He received his B.A. from the University of Virginia with a double major in political science and psychology and his Ph.D. in social psychology from Ohio State. Petty’s research focuses on the automatic and deliberative factors responsible for influencing people’s attitudes, decisions, and behaviors. He has published eight books and over 300 research articles and chapters. Petty is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Association for Psychological Science, the American Psychological Association, and four other societies. His honors include the Scientific Impact Award from the Society of Experimental Social Psychology and the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Awards from the Societies for Personality and Social Psychology and Consumer Psychology. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 36905 TEDx Talks
Science Of Persuasion
 
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http://www.influenceatwork.com This animated video describes the six universal Principles of Persuasion that have been scientifically proven to make you most effective as reported in Dr. Cialdini’s groundbreaking book, Influence. This video is narrated by Dr. Robert Cialdini and Steve Martin, CMCT (co-author of YES & The Small Big). About Robert Cialdini: Dr. Robert Cialdini, Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Marketing, Arizona State University has spent his entire career researching the science of influence earning him a worldwide reputation as an expert in the fields of persuasion, compliance, and negotiation. Dr. Cialdini’s books, including Influence: Science & Practice and Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion, are the result of decades of peer-reviewed published research on why people comply with requests. Influence has sold over 3 million copies, is a New York Times Bestseller and has been published in 30 languages. Because of the world-wide recognition of Dr. Cialdini’s cutting edge scientific research and his ethical business and policy applications, he is frequently regarded as the “Godfather of influence.” To inquire about Dr. Robert Cialdini’s speaking, Steve Martin, CMCT or any of our other Cialdini Method Certified Trainers (CMCTs) please contact INFLUENCE AT WORK at 480.967.6070 or [email protected] About INFLUENCE AT WORK: INFLUENCE AT WORK (IAW®) was founded by Robert Cialdini, Ph.D. as a professional resource to maximize influence results through ethical business applications. Offering participatory workshops and training, keynote presentations and intensive Cialdini Method Certified Trainer (CMCT) programs, IAW serves an international audience. For more information, visit our website at www.influenceatwork.com or call 480.967.6070. To order a poster of the final screen shot, visit https://www.influenceatwork.com/store/#!/Science-of-Persuasion-Animation-Poster/p/37513485/category=9805434 For more information on The Small BIG, visit http://www.thesmallbig.com/. For our latest, animated videos from THE SMALL BIG, visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S45ay... - narrated by Dr. Cialdini, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xMOlV... - narrated by Mr. Steve Martin, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S45ay... - narrated by Dr. Noah Goldstein. This animated video was created and produced by TINOPOLIS http://www.tinopolis.com/. Subscribe to our blog at: http://www.insideinfluence.com
Views: 11186600 influenceatwork
Scientific Studies: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
 
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John Oliver discusses how and why media outlets so often report untrue or incomplete information as science. Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happens: www.youtube.com/user/LastWeekTonight Find Last Week Tonight on Facebook like your mom would: http://Facebook.com/LastWeekTonight Follow us on Twitter for news about jokes and jokes about news: http://Twitter.com/LastWeekTonight Visit our official site for all that other stuff at once: http://www.hbo.com/lastweektonight
Views: 15173419 LastWeekTonight
26 PSYCHOLOGY FACTS YOU NEVER KNEW ABOUT PEOPLE
 
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Learning something new about yourself is always interesting and entertaining. And understanding the psychology behind the way we behave, treat others, and express ourselves can be even more appealing. Today, we here at Bright Side have compiled a list of the most surprising psychology facts that can help you better understand yourself and others. Other videos you might like: 10 Psychology Problems Caused by Parenting Behavior https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_eJPX-OI7c& 13 Psychology Tricks That Work On Anybody https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSvxuekIVuk& 12 Smart Psychological Tips You'd Better Learn https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Szahr27ReQo& SUMMARY: - Any friendship that begins in the period between 16 and 28 years of age is more likely to be robust and long-lasting. - Women generally prefer men with deep husky voices because they seem more confident and not aggressive. - The smarter the person is, the faster he thinks, and the sloppier his handwriting is. - Our emotions don’t affect the way we communicate. In fact, the way we communicate has an influence on our mood. - The way a person treats restaurant staff reveals a lot about their character. - People who have a strong sense of guilt understand others’ thoughts and feelings better. - Men are not funnier than women. They just make more jokes, not caring whether others like their humor or not. - Shy people talk little about themselves, but they do this in a way that makes other people feel that they know them very well. - Women have twice as many pain receptors in their bodies than men, but they have a much higher pain tolerance. - Listening to high-frequency music makes you feel calm, relaxed, and happy. - If you can’t stop your stream of thoughts at night, get up and write them down. This trick will set your mind at ease so you can sleep. - Good morning and good night text messages activate the part of the brain responsible for happiness. - Doing things that scare you will make you happier. - The average amount of time a woman can keep a secret is 47 hours and 15 minutes. - People who try to keep everyone happy often end up feeling the loneliest. - The happier we are, the less sleep we require. - When you hold the hand of your beloved, you feel less pain and worry less. - Intelligent people have fewer friends than the average person. The smarter the person is, the more selective they are. - Marrying your best friend eliminates the risk of divorce by over 70%. This marriage is more likely to last a lifetime. - The people who give the best advice are usually the ones with the most problems. - Women who have mostly male friends stay in a good mood more often. - People who speak two languages may unconsciously shift their personalities when they switch from one language to another. - Being alone for a long time is as bad for your health as smoking 15 cigarettes a day. - Travel boosts brain health and decreases a person’s risk of heart attack and depression. - People look more attractive when they speak about the things they are interested in. - When two people talk to each other, and one of them turns their feet slightly away or repeatedly moves one foot in an outward direction, this is a sign of disagreement. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 3057640 BRIGHT SIDE
The Science of Awkwardness
 
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awkward......... Sources and extra links below! me on twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tweetsauce me on instagram: http://www.instagram.com/electricpants music by http://www.youtube.com/JakeChudnow Embarrassment and prosociality: http://ist-socrates.berkeley.edu/~keltner/publications/FeinbergWillerKeltner2012.pdf Empathetic Embarrassment: http://www.npr.org/2014/07/19/332760081/the-opposite-of-schadenfreude-vicarious-embarrassment http://healthland.time.com/2011/05/05/why-your-embarassment-causes-me-so-much-pain/ Cringe subreddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/cringe awkward hug gifs: http://giphy.com/search/awkward-hug Embarrassment: http://www.apa.org/monitor/2012/11/embarrassment.aspx The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows: http://www.dictionaryofobscuresorrows.com The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows (on YouTube): https://www.youtube.com/user/obscuresorrows “Why Are We Morbidly Curious?” (related Vsauce video): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbdMMI6ty0o social rejection and physical pain: http://www.pnas.org/content/108/15/6270.full Social awkwardness and genetics: http://news.sciencemag.org/social-sciences/2009/11/socially-awkward-check-your-genes http://www.snpedia.com/index.php/Rs53576 Psychology experiments that test the breaking of social norms are called “breaching experiments”: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breaching_experiment Stage Fright: http://business.uni.edu/buscomm/Presentations/stagefright.html Oxytocin: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxytocin http://www.psyneuen-journal.com/article/S0306-4530(13)00211-4/abstract?cc=y Oxytocin and fear/anxiety: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-07/nu-tlh072213.php negativity bias: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negativity_bias more negative emotions than positive: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3156001/ https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/in-the-name-love/201007/are-negative-emotions-more-important-positive-emotions Eleanor Roosevelt quote: http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/26110-you-wouldn-t-worry-so-much-about-what-others-think-of “in you 20s and 30s…” quote: http://www.ihhp.com/equotes/ The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows: http://www.dictionaryofobscuresorrows.com The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows (on YouTube): https://www.youtube.com/user/obscuresorrows “sonder” gif: http://i.imgur.com/zxBZ0vF.gif
Views: 8583210 Vsauce
10 Psychology Facts Why You're the Way You're
 
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10 amazing psychological facts about human behavior. Over the years, scientists have uncovered many of the human brain’s mysteries and shortcomings that were securely hidden in our psyche. Bright Side invites you on a journey inside your own head to find out what makes your consciousness work. TIMESTAMPS We’re constantly altering our memories 0:35 We can only have a limited number of friends 1:25 We feel happier when we’re busy 1:57 We can memorize only 3-4 things at a time 2:52 Our visual perception of things differs from their appearance 3:49 We spend 30% of our time daydreaming 4:42 We can’t ignore 3 things in life: food, sex, and danger 5:28 We need as much choice as possible 6:15 Most of our decisions are unconscious 7:14 There’s no such thing as multitasking 8:13 Which fact was the most surprising for you? Share in the comments! Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ SMART Youtube: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Have you ever seen a talking slime? Here he is – Slick Slime Sam: https://goo.gl/zarVZo ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 1089897 BRIGHT SIDE
13 Study Tips: The Science of Studying
 
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Our brain can potentially memorize 2.5 petabytes of information, which is roughly the equivalent of 3 million hours of YouTube videos. In order to use some of that staggering capacity a little more effectively when you study, here are some tips that are based on widely accepted research by neuroscientists and learning experts. Support our channel at http://www.patreon.com/sprouts Books: - The Mind within the Net: Models of Learning, Thinking, and Acting, by Manfred Spitzer (http://a.co/5zaSMdF) - How we Learn, by Benedict Carey (http://a.co/aOJM4BW) - A Mind For Numbers, by Barbara Oakley, (http://a.co/7T1Gur4) Sources: Brain Capacity https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/what-is-the-memory-capacity/ Spaced Repetition http://science.sciencemag.org/content/344/6188/1173.full http://www.alzforum.org/news/research-news/while-you-were-sleeping-synapses-forged-amyloid-purged https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaced_repetition#Research_and_applications Find your own Style http://www.br-online.de/jugend/izi/english/publication/televizion/25_2012_E/huether_learning.pdf Good Night Sleep http://www.mcgill.ca/channels/news/give-it-time-and-sleep-25022 Spaced Repetition https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaced_repetition#Research_and_applications Pomodoro https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pomodoro_Technique Hard Stuff first https://staciechoice1010.wordpress.com/category/learning-solutions-in-action/ Expertise, Meditate, Converse https://www.ted.com/talks/sandrine_thuret_you_can_grow_new_brain_cells_here_s_how https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3004979/ Go Places https://www.tamu.edu/faculty/stevesmith/SmithMemory/SmithSageChapter.pdf Take Fun Seriously https://www.edutopia.org/blog/neuroscience-behind-stress-and-learning-judy-willis Space Your Studies http://www.psych.utoronto.ca/users/shkim/Bahrick%20et%20al.%20(1993)%20spacing%20effect.pdf 70% Recite vs 30% Memorizse https://archive.org/details/recitationasfact00gaterich Instant Self-Test http://learninglab.psych.purdue.edu/downloads/2006_Roediger_Karpicke_PsychSci.pdf
Views: 3504634 Sprouts
The Neuroscience of Creativity
 
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ORDER BRAINCRAFT MERCH! 🧠https://store.dftba.com/collections/braincraft SUBSCRIBE to BrainCraft! 👉 http://ow.ly/rt5IE My Twitter https://twitter.com/nessyhill | Instagram https://instagram.com/nessyhill Your brain uses lots of different pathways to communicate – which form complex networks in your brain. Creativity depends on the cooperation of two competing networks: one that generates spontaneous thoughts (the default mode network) and the executive control center of the brain that governs everything else. Our random, free-flowing thoughts that are worthy of further exploration pop into our consciousness when they're recruited by the executive control network. BrainCraft was created by Vanessa Hill (@nessyhill) and is brought to you by PBS Digital Studios. Talking psychology, neuroscience & why we act the way we do. This episode was written by Bahar Gholipour and produced/animated by Vanessa Hill. FURTHER READING 📚 Kidd, C., & Hayden, B. Y. (2015). The psychology and neuroscience of curiosity. Neuron, 88(3), 449-460. http://www.cell.com/neuron/fulltext/S0896-6273(15)00767-9 De Pisapia, N., Bacci, F., Parrott, D., & Melcher, D. (2016). Brain networks for visual creativity: a functional connectivity study of planning a visual artwork. Scientific reports, 6. https://www.nature.com/articles/srep39185 https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/beautiful-minds/the-real-neuroscience-of-creativity/
Views: 43611 BrainCraft
The psychology of self-motivation | Scott Geller | TEDxVirginiaTech
 
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Never miss a talk! SUBSCRIBE to the TEDx channel: http://bit.ly/1FAg8hB Scott Geller is Alumni Distinguished Professor at Virginia Tech and Director of the Center for Applied Behavior Systems in the Department of Psychology. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, and the World Academy of Productivity and Quality. He has written numerous articles and books, including When No One's Watching: Living and Leading Self-motivation. Scott will examine how we can become self-motivated in "The Psychology of Self-Motivation." In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 7969136 TEDx Talks
How to Write an Abstract Step-by-Step (With Examples)
 
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How to Write an Abstract. Once you’re done with your academic paper after months of hard work, you’ll also need to create an abstract of your paper, too. Since this writing summarizes and represents your work, you’ll want it to be picture perfect, right? Lucky for you, we’ve put together some tips on writing the best abstract, so pay close attention! TIMESTAMPS Find out the requirements 0:55 Pick the right abstract type 1:42 Consider your readers 3:27 Explain the importance of your research 4:10 Explain the problem and your methods 4:45 Avoid copy-pasting 5:19 Keep it well-structured and logical 6:15 Include key phrases and words 7:00 Sum it up 7:49 Editing and proofreading 8:18 Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY -Whether you’re writing it to apply for a conference, grant, journal publication, or work project, find out if there are any specific requirements regarding its length and style. -When it comes to abstract types, you have two options to choose from: descriptive versus informative. Normally, descriptive abstracts are written for shorter papers, and informative ones for longer more technical pieces. -Fellow scholars from the same research field will easily get the ideas and special terminology you use, while average readers or people from another scientific field probably won’t grasp complicated concepts. -As you get down to actually writing the abstract, there are four key points you wanna hit when explaining the importance of your research to your readers. -It’s really important to define the scope of your research. It’s imperative that your research has a key claim or argument, which is definitely worth mentioning in the abstract. -Your abstract should be an independent piece of writing and not a collage of disconnected paraphrased sentences. -No matter how short it has to be, your abstract should be built according to the usual essay model and have an introduction, body, and conclusion. -If you want your prospective readers to be able to find your work among millions of publications, adding 5 to 10 important key words or phrases to your abstract will certainly help. -An informative abstract should explain what answers the research helped you find and if it supported your original argument. -Check your abstract several times for grammar and spelling, and don’t forget to format it the right way. Another pair of eyes won’t hurt either. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 118631 BRIGHT SIDE
The surprising science of alpha males | Frans de Waal
 
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In this fascinating look at the "alpha male," primatologist Frans de Waal explores the privileges and costs of power while drawing surprising parallels between how humans and primates choose their leaders. His research reveals some of the unexpected capacities of alpha males -- generosity, empathy, even peacekeeping -- and sheds light on the power struggles of human politicians. "Someone who is big and strong and intimidates and insults everyone is not necessarily an alpha male," de Waal says. Check out more TED Talks: http://www.ted.com The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED
Views: 1108534 TED
The real reason conspiracy theories work
 
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Here's why we've evolved to fall for conspiracy theories. Listen to Sidenote: https://youtu.be/pyNLbJ9VStA WATCH MORE! Tech!: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLv... Health!: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLv... Food!: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLv... FOLLOW US! Greg Instagram: https://instagram.com/whalewatchmeplz Twitter: https://twitter.com/whalewatchmeplz Mitch Instagram: https://instagram.com/mitchellmoffit Twitter: https://twitter.com/mitchellmoffit ASAPScience Instagram: https://instagram.com/asapscience Facebook: https://facebook.com/asapscience Twitter: https://twitter.com/asapscience Tumblr: https://asapscience.tumblr.com Created by Mitchell Moffit and Gregory Brown Written by: Matthew Carter, Mitch Moffit & Greg Brown Illustrated by: Max Simmons Edited by: Sel Ghebrehiwot, Mitch Moffit & Greg Brown Send us stuff! ASAPSCIENCE INC. P.O. Box 93, Toronto P Toronto, ON, M5S2S6 REFERENCES https://undark.org/article/the-psychology-and-allure-of-conspiracy-theories/ https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-come-some-people-believe-in-the-paranormal/ http://time.com/4965093/conspiracy-theories-beliefs/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5646574/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5900972/ https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ejsp.2507 https://www.shape.com/blogs/shape-your-life/more-half-people-believe-conspiracy-theory https://www.seeker.com/why-do-so-many-people-believe-in-conspiracy-theories-1842225519.html https://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2013/04/12-million-americans-believe-lizard-people-run-our-country/316706/ https://www.orlandosentinel.com/opinion/os-op-florida-conspiracy-theories-20180906-story.html https://www.vox.com/2018/3/19/17139910/deep-state-poll-trump https://www.france24.com/en/20180108-8-10-french-people-believe-conspiracy-theory-survey http://time.com/5023383/conspiracy-theories-reasons-believe/ https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/nov/23/study-shows-60-of-britons-believe-in-conspiracy-theories https://www.publicpolicypolling.com/polls/republicans-more-likely-to-subscribe-to-conspiracy-theories/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z98U1nMFrJQ https://www.psychologytoday.com/ca/blog/experimentations/201810/what-makes-conspiracy-theorists-tick https://www.union.edu/news/stories/201809/Who-believes-in-conspiracies-Research-by-Union-professor-offers-a-theory https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6238178/ https://neurosciencenews.com/thinkng-error-creation-conspiracy-9716/ https://www.seeker.com/why-do-so-many-people-believe-in-conspiracy-theories-1842225519.html https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/schizotypal-personality-disorder/symptoms-causes/syc-20353919 https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/19/technology/youtube-conspiracy-stars.html https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/feb/17/study-blames-youtube-for-rise-in-number-of-flat-earthers https://www.sciencefocus.com/the-human-body/the-rise-of-the-flat-earthers/ https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1745691618774270 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/ejsp.2530 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kme1vaWJJms http://oxfordre.com/climatescience/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780190228620.001.0001/acrefore-9780190228620-e-328 https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/plot-kill-george-washington-180970729/
Views: 447221 AsapSCIENCE
5 Crazy Ways Social Media Is Changing Your Brain Right Now
 
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Your brain may never be the same! Watch our Q&A: http://youtu.be/thYzq0TEwbs Send us stuff! ASAPSCIENCE INC. P.O. BOX 93, Toronto P, TORONTO, ON, M5S2S6 Subscribe: http://bit.ly/10kWnZ7 Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1fjWszw Twitter: http://bit.ly/1d84R71 Tumblr: http://bit.ly/1amIPjF Vine: Search "AsapSCIENCE" on vine! Written and created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz). Further Reading-- Abnormal White Matter Integrity in Adolescents with Internet Addiction Disorder: A Tract-Based Spatial Statistics Study http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0030253 Phantom vibrations among undergraduates: Prevalence and associated psychological characteristics http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0747563212000799 Cognitive control in media multitaskers http://www.pnas.org/content/106/37/15583.abstract?sid=113b39d8-d0b5-4f46-b2a5-362ee79d0b61 Amygdala Volume and Social Network Size in Humans http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3079404/ What is the role of dopamine in reward: hedonic impact, reward learning, or incentive salience? http://www.lsa.umich.edu/psych/research&labs/berridge/publications/Berridge&RobinsonBrResRev1998.pdf
Views: 4179065 AsapSCIENCE
Calling Out Psychology Today: Science
 
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Psychology today released some pretty bad articles about science. Let us take a look at who actually denies science!
Views: 20 Aman From Kekistan
Basic science (psychology) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basic_science_(psychology) 00:01:10 1 Abnormal psychology 00:02:01 2 Biological psychology 00:03:08 3 Cognitive psychology 00:04:20 4 Developmental psychology 00:05:37 5 Experimental psychology 00:06:26 6 Evolutionary psychology 00:07:42 7 Mathematical psychology 00:09:04 8 Neuropsychology 00:09:50 9 Personality psychology 00:10:43 10 Psychophysics 00:11:19 11 Social psychology 00:12:16 12 Additional areas 00:12:33 13 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8255906125227717 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Some of the research that is conducted in the field of psychology is more "fundamental" than the research conducted in the applied psychological disciplines, and does not necessarily have a direct application. The subdisciplines within psychology that can be thought to reflect a basic-science orientation include biological psychology, cognitive psychology, neuropsychology, and so on. Research in these subdisciplines is characterized by methodological rigor. The concern of psychology as a basic science is in understanding the laws and processes that underlie behavior, cognition, and emotion. Psychology as a basic science provides a foundation for applied psychology. Applied psychology, by contrast, involves the application of psychological principles and theories yielded up by the basic psychological sciences; these applications are aimed at overcoming problems or promoting well-being in areas such as mental and physical health and education.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
32 Great Psychological Tips to Read People's Mind
 
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Sometimes we do something weird and then think, ‘What was the logic of my behavior?’ Was it there? In fact, there’s always some logic, but most often it hides in certain peculiarities of your mind. The human psyche is a pro at hiding its own secrets. Scientists have been working for years to understand everything about the mind and brain, yet there’s still so much left to find out. But you don't necessarily have to be an expert in psychology to understand what's going on in other people's heads and use it to your advantage. There are some psychological tips that work on a subconscious level that help you win another person's trust, get somebody's approval, and relax when you’re stressed out. Watch the video till the end to understand why we always want something that is impossible to achieve and why we act one way or another! TIMESTAMPS: Who people look at when they're laughing 1:04 Constant changing of your memories 2:09 How to get any information you need 4:42 Clustering illusion 7:15 The secret of a small mirror 8:29 The Kuleshov Effect 11:28 How much time you spend in La-la Land 12:11 "Body Negative" 13:52 What 3 things you can't NOT notice 14:10 Survivorship Bias 15:30 Hard-to-Reach Effect 17:32 The Fear of Beauty 19:30 #psychologicaltricks #readpeople #psychologyhacks Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY: - After a good joke or in the middle of an interesting discussion, every person instinctively looks at the person they like the most. This is because they want to make sure that the object of their desires approves of and shares their sense of humor. - People often imagine their memories like short films or video clips. You store them somewhere in the attic of your brain, and they stay there collecting dust and never changing. But this isn't exactly true. - If you don't like the answer someone has given you, or it seems like they’re not telling you the whole story, just keep staring at them. - If you have to talk to a lot of people at work, hang a small mirror behind your desk. You’ll be surprised that many people will be more polite and ready to meet you halfway in negotiations. This is because nobody likes to see themselves angry or annoyed. - The effect when a viewer, after seeing two unrelated frames, unconsciously makes up a logical connection between them is called the Kuleshov effect. - Scientists from the University of California are saying that every single day people spend 30% of their time in La-la Land. - "Body negative" is a condition where a person thinks they’re ugly, and this is why their personal life is a fail. And their whole life is a fail. Most often such people are attractive, and the problem is more about self-esteem than real flaws. - You can't NOT notice 3 things: food, sex, and danger - Most often we judge a situation only by successful people ("survivors"), and that’s why we know just one side of it. - Roughly speaking, this is the phenomenon telling that the hard-to-reach is always more desirable. Even if we look at it from a human level: closed, high-status, "no-one-knows-what’s-on-their-mind" people always seem more attractive than others. - Some people feel excessive tension next to beautiful people: excitement, double control of one’s actions, the desire to save face, and fear of comparison. Such stress doesn’t arise next to an average person. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 1597753 BRIGHT SIDE
Is psychology broken?
 
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Several famous studies in psychology have failed replications. What does that mean? Is psychology okay? References: http://www.nature.com/news/first-results-from-psychology-s-largest-reproducibility-test-1.17433 http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/cover_story/2016/03/ego_depletion_an_influential_theory_in_psychology_may_have_just_been_debunked.html https://osf.io/92dhr/wiki/home/ https://twitter.com/lakens/status/757262308561289216 http://datacolada.org/53/ http://datacolada.org/47 http://datacolada.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/5341-Nosek-et-al-Science-2015-Estimating-the-reproducibility-of-psychological-science.pdf https://digest.bps.org.uk/2016/09/16/ten-famous-psychology-findings-that-its-been-difficult-to-replicate/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wClqZ9Z6Q1o http://pps.sagepub.com/content/11/4/546.full http://europepmc.org/articles/PMC4206661/figure/F2/ http://archive.is/aK7Vn https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wClqZ9Z6Q1o
Views: 649 Deciderata
19 Simple Psychological Tricks That Actually Work
 
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Have you ever had to use psychological tricks to get what you want? There are a lot of psychological tricks and neuro-linguistic programming tips and there are millions of books and articles written about them. Many of these tricks really help professionals manipulate people and avoid being tricked by others. But are there tips that non-professionals can use on a daily basis? Psychology is a science with certain laws one cannot ignore. Modern marketing specialists, entrepreneurs, and even swindlers realize that. Bright Side offers a few psychological tricks you can use in everyday life to make it much easier and more exciting for you to reach your goals. TIMESTAMPS: #1 0:29 #2 0:58 #3 1:18 #4 1:46 #5 2:03 #6 2:17 #7 2:40 #8 3:06 #9 3:21 #10 3:36 #11 3:55 #12 4:20 #13 4:49 #14 5:19 #15 5:51 #16 6:04 #17 6:19 #18 6:38 #19 7:04 #psychologicaltricks #psychologicaltips #changelife Music by Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/ SUMMARY: - Never start your request with the words "Could you..." It can cause the other person to subconsciously assume that this is a theoretical question - If you ever want someone to feel uncomfortable, look at the middle of their forehead during the conversation. - If someone you're talking to is trying to avoid answering a question, just make a pause in the conversation while still keeping eye contact. - When asking a question that you want an affirmative answer to, try to nod subtly as you make your request. This trick is often used by restaurants employees to make guests buy more food, and it’s pretty effective! - If a person is really concentrated on a task (let's say they're in the middle of a serious phone conversation), you can extend your hand to them and get anything they’re holding at the moment. - If you want somebody to do something for you, casually say how they probably wouldn’t even be able to do it. Most people will try really hard to prove someone wrong when it comes to doubting their capabilities. - Here’s a good one for negotiations. If you like a person's offer in general but would like to get better conditions, pretend to be a little bit disappointed. - As soon as your alarm clock goes off, sit up, make two fists, and yell "Yeah!" as if you’re a soccer player who's just scored a goal. It sounds bizarre, but it really does help you easily get out of bed feeling refreshed. - If a person tries to pull you into an argument or some drama, say something nice to them. The ol’ “kill ‘em with kindness” trick really does stop them in their tracks. - If you have that one lazy person on your team that slows the whole work process down, don't give them tasks by saying "Do this." It’s better to say "Start with this." - If someone is staring at you in the subway (happens all-too often, right?), just look at their shoes. Don't give up, keep gazing! It’ll drive them crazy! - If someone has done something wrong, but you don’t wanna sound too accusing, change the way you construct your sentences. - If you didn't get a good night's sleep, tell yourself that you did. I know, it sounds like nonsense, but it does work 100% if you say it with meaning! - People are better at remembering what happened at the beginning and end of the day. As for anything that went on in between, it gets blurry. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 26305805 BRIGHT SIDE
How To Read a Scholarly Journal Article
 
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Recognize the structure of scholarly articles in order to use them most effectively in your research projects. With Tim Lockman, Kishwaukee College librarian.
Psychology Of THE PUNISHER - Science Behind Superheroes
 
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Is the Punisher truly insane? Or is his rampage driven by something else? SOURCES OF NOTE: http://www.wikihow.com/Spot-a-Sociopath https://www.psychologytoday.com/basics/psychopathy http://www.smithsonianmag.com/ist/?next=/history/phineas-gage-neurosciences-most-famous-patient-11390067/ http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd/index.shtml http://www.helpguide.org/articles/ptsd-trauma/emotional-and-psychological-trauma.htm
The British Journal of Social Psychology Landmark Article Podcast
 
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Read Susan Fiske's landmark article in Volume 51, Issue 1 of the BJSP here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.2044-8309.2011.02092.x/full
Views: 1079 Wiley
Weird Science: An Introduction to Anomolistic Psychology
 
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Presented by Professor Chris French at our August 3, 2011 Drinking Skeptically in Silver Spring, MD. The Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit (APRU) was set up by Professor Chris French in 2000 in the Department of Psychology at Goldsmiths College, University of London. Anomalistic psychology may be defined as the study of extraordinary phenomena of behaviour and experience, including (but not restricted to) those that are often labeled "paranormal". Over the last decade, members of the APRU have investigated a wide range of weird and wonderful topics, including alien contact experiences, sleep paralysis, haunted houses, dowsing, and telepathy. Many paranormal claims have been scientifically tested under properly controlled conditions along the way. This overview will present some of the results of such investigations. Professor Chris French is the Head of the Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit in the Psychology Department at Goldsmiths, University of London. He is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society and of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry, as well as being a Distinguished Supporter of the British Humanist Association and a member of the Scientific and Professional Advisory Board of the British False Memory Society. He has published over 100 articles and chapters covering a wide range of topics within psychology. His main current area of research is the psychology of paranormal beliefs and anomalous experiences. He frequently appears on radio and television casting a sceptical eye over paranormal claims, as well as writing for the Guardian's online science pages. For more than a decade, he edited The Skeptic and his latest book, co-edited with Wendy Grossman, is Why Statues Weep: The Best of The Skeptic (London: The Philosophy Press).
Views: 4768 NCASVideo
Psychology of Trolling | Tamil Science
 
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Check out our latest video about Manual Scavenging! - https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=9PwIv6kVurU As most of us are familiar with the trolls. In this episode of Arivu Theeni learn a little about how social scientists think trolls came to be, and how online communities are figuring it all out. Links http://scottbarrykaufman.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/trolls-just-want-to-have-fun.pdf http://www.wired.co.uk/article/online-aggression http://www.academia.edu/3658367/The_online_disinhibition_effect https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2179886 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0191886914000324 http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/climate_desk/2014/02/internet_troll_personality_study_machiavellianism_narcissism_psychopathy.html https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/what-psychopath-means/ https://www.theguardian.com/media-network/media-network-blog/2014/sep/18/psychology-internet-trolls-pewdiepie-youtube-mary-beard Connect with us: Facebook - facebook.com/ArivuTheeni Twitter - twitter.com/ArivuTheeni Google - google.com/+ArivuTheeni Instagram - instagram.com/ArivuTheeni
Views: 1502 Arivu Theeni
The Science of Being Transgender ft. Gigi Gorgeous
 
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What can science teach us about gender identity and dysphoria? Thanks so much to Gigi Gorgeous! https://youtu.be/83jGTVHGj1Y Check out our new PODCAST: http://sidenotepodcast.com Subscribe for more! http://bit.ly/asapsci The Trevor Project's 24/7/365 Lifeline at 866-4-U-TREVOR (866-488-7386) or https://www.thetrevorproject.org The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK (8255) Trans Lifeline at 877-565-8860 Created by: Mitchell Moffit and Gregory Brown Written by: Jodre Datu, Greg Brown and Mitch Moffit Illustrated by: Max Simmons Edited by: Sel Ghebrehiwot Narrated by: Mitch Moffit FOLLOW US! Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube AsapINSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/asapscience/ Facebook: http://facebook.com/AsapSCIENCE Twitter: http://twitter.com/AsapSCIENCE Tumblr: http://asapscience.tumblr.com Created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz). Send us stuff! ASAPSCIENCE INC. P.O. Box 93, Toronto P Toronto, ON, M5S2S6 Further Reading/References https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK9967/ http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/xx-male-syndrome-0 https://academic.oup.com/endo/article/142/8/3281/2988779 http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/males-and-females-differ-in-specific-brain-structures https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3896179/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4350266/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21334362 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4350266/ https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/917990-overview#a4 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7477289 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22941717 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4037295/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10983252 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17765230 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23398495 https://williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/AFSP-Williams-Suicide-Report-Final.pdf https://globalnews.ca/news/3648571/transgender-gene-study/ http://www.apa.org/topics/lgbt/transgender.aspx http://www.bu.edu/research/articles/lgbt-issues-stem-diversity/ https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26511-out-in-the-open-is-science-lgbt-friendly/ https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/01/remembering-the-transgender-scientist-who-changed-our-understanding-of-the-brain/549458/ https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-lgbt-biology/born-this-way-researchers-explore-the-science-of-gender-identity-idUSKBN1AJ0F0
Views: 1069096 AsapSCIENCE
10 Simple Psychological Tricks That Always Work
 
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Can you shape how others perceive you? Do you ever wish you could control what people thought of you? Or maybe you just wanna communicate in a more confident way? Well, you don’t need any magical powers to make it happen — just good old-fashioned psychology tricks! Other videos you might like: 19 Simple Psychological Tricks That Actually Work https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l4tWdTmYZoM& 10 Tricks from a Former FBI Agent to Become 200% Attractive https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JxVryHiRnDE& Science Proves Anyone Can Fall In Love With You https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9maxVPfUdDI TIMESTAMPS: Find out if someone is secretly looking at you 0:36 Diffuse a conflict with food 1:45 Get someone to tell you more 3:10 Make yourself memorable in job interviews 3:47 Form stronger bonds with people 4:54 Control people’s assumptions about you 5:42 Make someone feel like they’re important 6:43 Get someone to help you do something 7:49 Get people to believe in you 8:33 Keep people’s attention 9:24 Music by Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/ SUMMARY: - If you want to learn if someone has been looking at you, try yawning. No, it’s not some secret code, but if someone is looking at you and you happen to yawn, they won’t be able to help but yawn themselves. - The food serves as a great distraction and can actually relieve tension since you’ll start to care more about the food than what you’re talking about. - When there’s silence, the other person is more likely to talk and will probably say more than they would if you were to interject. - A sure way to stand out from the crowd is to use the “serial position effect.” This is based on the idea that people tend to remember the first and last parts of things and not as much of the middle. - If you’re in a new relationship or starting a friendship with someone, instead of going to the movies or out to eat, try doing an activity together that can get your blood pumping. - While you’re talking and getting to know each other, try to point out something you both have in common. Maybe you grew up in the same town or you both have the same alma mater. - When you meet someone for the first time at a party or work event, say their name right after they introduce themselves. - Instead of asking the person point blank if they can help, pose a false dilemma. - Even if you aren’t sure of something, that doesn’t mean you should question what you say. Try leaving out the word “I think” when you talk to your friends and family. - For people to pay attention to what you’re saying, keep direct eye contact with them while you’re talking. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Photos: https://www.depositphotos.com East News ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 1556470 BRIGHT SIDE
Mental Disorders as Brain Disorders: Thomas Insel at TEDxCaltech
 
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Thomas R. lnsel, M.D. is director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) charged with generating knowledge needed to understand, treat, and prevent mental disorders. Prior to his appointment as NIMH Director in 2002, Tom was professor of psychiatry at Emory University where he was founding director of the NSF Center for Behavioral Neuroscience and director of an NIH-funded Center for Autism Research. He has published over 250 scientific articles and four books and has served on numerous academic, scientific, and professional committees and boards. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, a fellow of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, and a recipient of the Outstanding Service Award from the U.S. Public Health Service and the 2010 La Fondation IPSEN Neuronal Plasticity Prize. No endorsement of this event by NIMH/NIH is intended. In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations) On January 18, 2013, Caltech hosted TEDxCaltech: The Brain, a forward-looking celebration of humankind's quest to understand the brain, by exploring the past, present and future of neuroscience. Visit TEDxCaltech.com for more details.
Views: 124369 TEDx Talks
Do you trust psychology? The Rosenhan Experiment
 
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The battle of Sane vs. Insane. The Rosenhan experiment was a famous experiment done in order to determine the validity of psychiatric diagnosis, conducted by psychologist David Rosenhan, a Stanford University professor, and published by the journal Science in 1973 under the title "On being sane in insane places". Despite the provocative title, which is designed to initiate date, Lifelong Learners would like to acknowledge the huge amount of value provided by expert psychologists. Do you have positive or negative experiences with psychologists? Post below. My equipment: Hardware (1) Microphone: http://amzn.to/2wRW60p (2) Phone Recording: http://amzn.to/2htNLuh (3) DSLR Recording: http://amzn.to/2xF17h4 (4) Laptop: http://amzn.to/2hsHI9x Software: (1) Visual/ Animation software: (a) Videoscribe, (b) Adobe Premiere Pro, (c) Powtoon. (2) Audio: Audacity (3) Thumbnails: Powerpoint To learn more see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j6bmZ8cVB4oTo see more information http://psychrights.org/articles/Rosenham.htm Check out other great content: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KScrHGrbaxs
Views: 6305 Lifelong Learners
The Science of Anti-Vaccination
 
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Fewer children in the United States are getting vaccinated. That’s bad news for those kids, and also for public health in general. Often, the response is to argue and debate and get angry at people who are we see as making terrible, irrational decisions. Instead of doing that, let’s use science to understand why this is happening in the first place. Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow Sources: Meta-Analysis of the Safety of Vaccines: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/134/2/325 The Internet and the Psychology of Vaccination Decisions: http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=19849 Naturalness Bias: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18319507 Omission Bias and Vaccines: http://mdm.sagepub.com/content/14/2/118 Difficulty in changing minds once they’re made: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2014/02/25/peds.2013-2365 Onset Patterns of Autism: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2857525/ Bad is Stronger than Good - Negativity Bias: http://assets.csom.umn.edu/assets/71516.pdf Parental Vaccine Decision Making: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24011751 Read more about Risk Perception: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Risk_perception And Explanatory Style: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Explanatory_style http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/autism/detail_autism.htm
Views: 2205554 SciShow
Why Is It So Hard to Fix Traffic?
 
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Fixing traffic seems easy—just add more roads, right? Turns out that this is a problem studied by physicists and psychologists alike, with no easy answers. Hosted by: Hank Green Head to https://scishowfinds.com/ for hand selected artifacts of the universe! ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: Jerry Perez, Lazarus G, Kelly Landrum Jones, Sam Lutfi, Kevin Knupp, Nicholas Smith, D.A. Noe, alexander wadsworth, سلطان الخليفي, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Charles Southerland, Bader AlGhamdi, James Harshaw, Patrick D. Ashmore, Candy, Tim Curwick, charles george, Saul, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Viraansh Bhanushali, Kevin Bealer, Philippe von Bergen, Chris Peters, Justin Lentz ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: http://www.physics.upenn.edu/liugroup/jamming.html https://journals.aps.org/pre/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevE.48.3290 https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2000/12/the-physics-of-gridlock/378457/ http://jliszka.github.io/2013/10/01/how-traffic-actually-works.html https://www.researchgate.net/publication/243567449_Shock_Wave_Relation_Containing_Lane_Change_Source_Term_for_Two-Lane_Traffic_Flow https://books.google.com/books?id=dHW1BQAAQBAJ&pg=PA509&lpg=PA509#v=onepage&q&f=false https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-540-77074-9_41 http://homepage.ruhr-uni-bochum.de/Dietrich.Braess/Paradox-BNW.pdf https://www.forbes.com/sites/quora/2016/10/20/bad-traffic-blame-braess-paradox/ https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=783424 http://www.vtpi.org/gentraf.pdf https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2006/nov/01/society.travelsenvironmentalimpact https://grist.org/infrastructure/2011-04-04-seoul-korea-tears-down-an-urban-highway-life-goes-on/ http://legacy.wbur.org/2012/07/12/big-dig-effect https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iHzzSao6ypE https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/a59b/0aa97491aed923a38742142fc6492e51b080.pdf https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7375327 https://www.wsj.com/articles/one-driver-can-prevent-a-traffic-jam-1476204858 https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/bitstream/handle/10919/55073/811079.pdf?sequence=1 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1367-2630/aa95f0 https://www.quora.com/At-a-red-light-why-do-some-drivers-leave-a-huge-gap-between-themselves-and-the-car-in-front-of-them https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160913125211.htm http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/science/science-news/8011029/Aggressive-and-timid-drivers-cause-traffic-jams-scientists-discover.html https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-642-24660-9_25 https://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/13/us/why-last-second-lane-mergers-are-good-for-traffic.html Media: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Miami_traffic_jam,_I-95_North_rush_hour.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Seoul-Restoration_site_02.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:San_Francisco-Embarcadero_Freeway_demolition.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:San_Francisco_(5765603478).jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cheonggyecheon.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Jazda_na_suwak_ulica_Starzy%C5%84skiego_wjazd_na_Most_Gda%C5%84ski_w_Warszawie.JPG
Views: 690348 SciShow
The Attachment Theory - How Childhood Trauma Affects Your Life
 
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The attachment theory argues that a strong emotional and physical bond to one primary caregiver in our first years of life, is critical to our development. If our bonding is strong and we are securely attached, then we feel safe to explore the world. If our bond is weak, we feel insecurely attached. We are afraid to leave or explore a rather scary-looking world. Because we are not sure if we can return. Often we then don't understand our own feelings. Special thanks for our patroeon supporters: Ville Medeiros, Chutimon Nuangnit, Cedric Wang, Mike, Eva Marie Koblin, Julien Dumesnil, Mathis and the others. You are wonderful !!! If you feel helpful and want to support our channel, write a comment, subscribe and spread the word or become a patron on www.patreon.com/sprouts. Full Script: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1v82PcEvf_G2iolc5ejPY5dQ2RtqU1Vj9V5L_iIKWUhk/edit?usp=sharing Dealing with Attachment Issues: Dealing with Attachment Issues is no easy task. For those who feel like they can’t help themselves, or can’t find trust through their partners of family, we recommend looking for professional support through a therapy. If you are able to form a secure attachment to a therapist, he can become the one who provides you with that secure base. Here three of possible therapies: 1. Psychoanalysis. The aim of psychoanalysis therapy is to release repressed emotions and experiences, i.e., make the unconscious conscious. In order to do that they therapist might try to bring back some childhood memories, to work at the root cause of the problem. 2. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). CBT is a psycho-social intervention that is widely used for improving mental health. Instead of trying to bring you back in time, it aims to explain you whats going on inside your brain and how to cope with irrational feelings or fears. 3. The Hoffmann Process. This 7-8 days guided process, designed by the American psychologist Hoffmann, brings participants back into their childhood to reconnect with their parents at the time when attachment is formed. Its very intensive. Sources: Havard Study https://arizona.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/feelings-of-parental-caring-predict-health-status-in-midlife-a-35 Minnesota Study https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2857405/ Further Readins: https://www.psychologistworld.com/developmental/attachment-theory
Views: 1742080 Sprouts
HEROES OF THE STORM PSYCHOLOGY: DELAYED GRATIFICATION | Use science to be a better player! 🔎
 
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In the first episode of Storm Psychology, Tempo Storm Parkzer explains the concept of delayed gratification, and provides examples on how you can put this theory into practice to win more games of Heroes of the Storm. If you're wondering why I used Cho'gall as the graphic ... Cho seems like an ogre who would want instant gratification, while Gall scolds him for not waiting for a greater reward in the future. Text version written by Corey Tincher: https://tempostorm.com/articles/storm-psychology-delayed-gratification Table of Contents 00:03 – Introduction 01:56 – 1. Experience soaking 02:36 – 2. Map vision 03:17 – 3. Waiting to select talents 03:56 – 4. Camp timing 05:02 – 5. Ability cooldowns 05:48 – 6. Stack-building talents 06:39 – 7. Communication 07:28 – Conclusion --- Buy games, subscription memberships, and more for incredible prices at https://www.G2A.com/r/tempo-storm. Use our code "TEMPO" for 3% off your purchases! --- Looking for more Heroes of the Storm content? Check out the following streams! Dreadnaught: http://twitch.tv/Dreadnaught_Heroes So1dier: http://twitch.tv/So1dier Kaeyoh: http://twitch.tv/Kaeyoh Zoia: http://twitch.tv/ZoiaTV Parkzer: http://twitch.tv/Parkzer For more Tempo Storm: http://TempoStorm.com https://twitter.com/Tempo_Storm http://twitch.tv/team/TempoStorm https://facebook.com/TempoStormHS --- Tempo Storm is a professional eSports organization featuring some of the best players and casters in Hearthstone, Heroes of the Storm, the Fighting Game Community (FGC), FIFA, and World of Warcraft. Founded by Reynad, Tempo Storm has grown from a Hearthstone-only organization to having a strong presence in a myriad of competitive eSports scenes under his guidance.
Views: 4158 Tempo Storm Heroes
12 Smart Psychological Tips You'd Better Learn
 
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How to make people like you? Bright Side is sharing 12 tips that will work every time and can help you out in any situation and help you win another person's trust. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ SMART Youtube: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Have you ever seen a talking slime? Here he is – Slick Slime Sam: https://goo.gl/zarVZo ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 5235058 BRIGHT SIDE
Psychology Hacks to Become a Better Teacher (or Student!)
 
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If you are a teacher who is trying to make new lesson plans, or a student trying to learn more, we have some psychology hacks for you! Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It's called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at https://www.scishowtangents.org ---------- Huge thanks go to the following Patreon supporters for helping us keep SciShow free for everyone forever: Adam Brainard, Greg, Alex Hackman. Sam Lutfi, D.A. Noe, الخليفي سلطان, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Charles Southerland, Patrick D. Ashmore, charles george, Kevin Bealer, Chris Peters ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: Sources: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/media-spotlight/201405/the-return-dr-fox https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1120118 https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0181775 http://www-inst.eecs.berkeley.edu/~cs301/sp15/resources/Williams_Howm_I_Doing.pdf https://www.psychologicalscience.org/journals/pspi/PSPI_9_3.pdf https://www.wired.com/2015/01/need-know-learning-styles-myth-two-minutes/ https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1467-9450.2005.00462.x https://psycnet.apa.org/fulltext/2000-12129-008.html https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF00308685 https://www.dartmouth.edu/~cogedlab/pubs/Kang(2016,PIBBS).pdf https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/a59f/da0eaecfa15a51c672a9ee6fc0ec4d526fae.pdf https://psycnet.apa.org/fulltext/2005-14834-002.pdf https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21707204 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5126970/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11826272 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20580350 https://npjscilearncommunity.nature.com/users/58416-jonathan-firth/posts/19254-spacing-out-instruction-for-more-effective-learning https://www.nifdi.org/15/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=52&Itemid=27 https://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/1001315.pdf https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.3102/00028312019001075 http://www.indiana.edu/~pcl/rgoldsto/courses/dunloskyimprovinglearning.pdf https://www.evullab.org/pdf/CepedaPashlerVulWixtedRohrer-PB-2006.pdf https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/agricultural-and-biological-sciences/testing-effect https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.3758%2FBF03202713.pdf http://learninglab.psych.purdue.edu/downloads/2006_Roediger_Karpicke_PsychSci.pdf https://pages.wustl.edu/files/pages/imce/memory/2007_kang.pdf http://science.sciencemag.org/content/331/6018/772 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21252317 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/9781118900772.etrds0289 http://memory.psych.purdue.edu/downloads/2010_Karpicke_Zaromb_JML.pdf https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.5408/14-051.1 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/acp.2914 https://www.pnas.org/content/111/23/8410 https://www.pnas.org/content/pnas/suppl/2014/05/08/1319030111.DCSupplemental/pnas.201319030SI.pdf https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/f18b/b53e645d6c7c64ea85d2b22281555f6f1302.pdf https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/j.2168-9830.2004.tb00809.x https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21364101 https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Gail_Hudson/publication/254344820_Academic_Performance_of_College_Students_Influence_of_Time_Spent_Studying_and_Working/links/53e265dc0cf275a5fdd727d8/Academic-Performance-of-College-Students-Influence-of-Time-Spent-Studying-and-Working.pdf https://psycnet.apa.org/fulltext/1982-24391-001.pdf
Views: 160665 SciShow Psych
Monogamy
 
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Hank examines the zoological definition of monogamy, as well as some other breeding strategies that animals use. Like SciShow on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Follow SciShow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow References women give kids more genes than men: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=the-x-chromosome-and-monogamy Monogamy uncommon: http://articles.latimes.com/2009/nov/22/opinion/la-oe-barash22-2009nov22 Dunnocks: http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/life/Dunnock#p007tx02 and: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/exposed-secret-sex-life-of-the-female-decievers--genetic-fingerprinting-techniques-have-exposed-monogamy-among-birds-as-a-myth-fostered-by-the-victorians-scientists-say-that-adultery-is-commonplace-and-a-deliberate-survival-strategy-steve-connor-reports-1566073.html Polygamy: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn14817-polygamy-left-its-mark-on-the-human-genome.html How monogamy evolved with human behaviour: http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2008/feb/14/relationships http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VFmxZitx5Bw IMAGES: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dunnock_crop2.jpg http://digitalmedia.fws.gov/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/natdiglib&CISOPTR=1726&CISOBOX=1&REC=2 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Malagasy.giant.rat.arp.jpg
Views: 1144651 SciShow
Joe Rogan Experience #1191 - Peter Boghossian & James Lindsay
 
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Peter Boghossian is a philosophy instructor, activist, author, speaker, and atheism advocate. He is a full-time faculty member at Portland State University. James Lindsay has a Ph.D. in mathematics and a background in physics and is also the author of three books.
Views: 1408683 PowerfulJRE
Are There "Male" and "Female" Brains?
 
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If you looked at a male and female brain side by side, would you be able to see any differences? Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: Lazarus G, Sam Lutfi, Nicholas Smith, D.A. Noe, alexander wadsworth, سلطا الخليفي, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Charles Southerland, Bader AlGhamdi, James Harshaw, Patrick D. Ashmore, Candy, Tim Curwick, charles george, Saul, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Viraansh Bhanushali, Kevin Bealer, Philippe von Bergen, Chris Peters, Justin Lentz ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3008499/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3969295/ https://academic.oup.com/cercor/advance-article/doi/10.1093/cercor/bhy109/4996558 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24746928 https://academic.oup.com/cercor/article/23/10/2514/296735 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2605782/ http://www.pnas.org/content/112/50/15468 http://www.pnas.org/content/pnas/113/14/E1965.full.pdf http://www.pnas.org/content/113/14/E1969.full https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2892674/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2329809/ https://stanmed.stanford.edu/2017spring/how-mens-and-womens-brains-are-different.html http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/04/study-finds-some-significant-differences-brains-men-and-women http://sciencenordic.com/what-we-don%E2%80%99t-know-about-gender-differences-brain Image Sources: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dopamine_pathways.svg https://academic.oup.com/view-large/figure/116717159/bhy109f02.tif https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:PhrenologyPix.jpg https://academic.oup.com/view-large/figure/116717153/bhy109f01.tif
Views: 321119 SciShow Psych
Psychology and Nature IV: Study and Careers
 
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For all videos in this playlist, go to: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLRfHZ9wXKs6dptZx0YVwH0B-H0T4VOK57 Dr. Thomas J. Doherty is a licensed psychologist whose work integrates clinical, environmental and organizational perspectives. He specializes in ecopsychology–a perspective that views psychology, identity and mental health in terms of ecology and global sustainability. Thomas has worked with individuals and groups for over 25 years. He co-founded and directs the Ecopsychology Certificate Program at Lewis & Clark Graduate School. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, Past President of the Society for Environmental, Population and Conservation Psychology, and founding editor of the Ecopsychology journal. Thomas has published articles and chapters on topics such as research methods in outdoor therapy and the psychological impacts of global climate change. For more information on the research cited in this video see: http://selfsustain.com/psychology-and-nature-video-resources/ or contact Thomas Doherty ([email protected]). Additional information: American Psychological Association Division 34, the Society for Environmental, Population, and Conservation Psychology website: http://www.apa.org/about/division/div34.aspx Sustainable Self: ‪http://www.selfsustain.com Portland Community College’s Psychology program: ‪http://www.pcc.edu/programs/psychology Ecopsychology Certificate Program at Lewis & Clark Graduate School: https://graduate.lclark.edu/programs/continuing_education/certificates/ecopsychology/ Ecopsychology Journal: ‪ http://www.liebertpub.com/overview/ecopsychology/300/ American Psychological Association Task Force on Global Climate Change Report: ‪http://www.apa.org/science/about/publications/climate-change.aspx Teaching Psychology for Sustainability: ‪http://www.teachgreenpsych.com/ This video was produced by the: Psychology Program, Video Production Unit and Distance Education at Portland Community College. Written and performed by: Dr. Thomas Doherty Produced by: Dr. Tatiana Snyder Produced and directed by: Michael Annus Lighting: Mike McNamara Camera: Kevin Forrest Grip/Teleprompter: Derek Skeen Editor: Lucia DeLisa
Views: 1140 PCC Videos
The Science of Six Degrees of Separation
 
09:23
Are all people on Earth really connected through just six steps? There's much more science in this than I initially expected. It turns out ordered networks with a small degree of randomness become small-work networks. This is why your acquaintances turn out to be more important in job searches and finding new opportunities than close friends. DON'T SEND ME AN EMAIL anymore... 1. Do not send it directly to me unless you know me. 2. Send the email to someone you have met IN PERSON and know on a first name basis AND THEY KNOW YOU. 3. Make the subject line 'Six Degrees of Veritasium' 4. Explain that you're trying to get this email to me and ask them to forward it on to me (only if they know me IRL) or someone they know who might know me. 5. If your email reaches me by Sept. 1, 2015 I will email you back and ask for your address so I can send you a postcard. Animations in this video by The Lyosacks: https://www.youtube.com/user/TheLyosacks There are some great books on this topic: Duncan Watts, Six Degrees: The Science of a Connected Age Albert-Laszlo Barabasi, Linkds: How Everything is Connected to Everything Else And here are articles I referred to: Milgram's small world experiment: http://www.uvm.edu/~pdodds/files/papers/others/1969/travers1969.pdf http://snap.stanford.edu/class/cs224w-readings/milgram67smallworld.pdf Granovetter, Strength of Weak Ties: https://sociology.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/publications/the_strength_of_weak_ties_and_exch_w-gans.pdf
Views: 3001262 Veritasium
Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection
 
03:22
Learn how to find articles for your psychology classes.
Views: 473 RCPughLibrary
7 Psychological Effects That Rule Your Whole Life
 
10:39
Did you know you could sell a $20 bill for ten times its value? Or that a person you’re physically attracted to may not be as smart and funny as you think? Or that the only reason why there’s this third option on the market is to create the decoy? All these things are called cognitive biases, and they rule your entire life without you even knowing it. Here are some of the most prominent ones. Other videos you might like: 20+ Psychology Tricks to Read Anyone Like a Book https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RMPxx71ICxk& 10 Tricks from a Former FBI Agent to Become 200% Attractive https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JxVryHiRnDE& 12 Things That Ruin a First Impression Immediately https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JrbnTZPjg0k& TIMESTAMPS: Phenomenon of Max Bazerman 0:25 Decoy effect 2:23 Halo effect 4:00 Framing effect 5:00 Illusion of control 6:05 Dr. Fox effect 7:45 Spotlight effect 9:17 #psychology #humanbrain #brightside Music by Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/ SUMMARY: - How hard could it be to take 20 bucks from an MBA student? In fact, Professor Max Bazerman proves it’s easy-peasy. In 2010, he first conducted an experiment at his class where he organized a simple auction: he would give a $20 bill to the student who pays the most money for it. The $20 bill was sold for $204. - The only reason why there’s this third option on the market is to create this decoy to make you buy a more expensive product. - You may not notice this, but when you see an attractive person, you tend to exaggerate their good traits of character. And that’s the gist of the halo effect. - We tend to prefer an option that is described in a positive way. Even if the only other option is absolutely the same, people will likely disregard it because it’s been given a negative description. - Although a situation can be completely random, people tend to think their choice somehow affects the results. We like to be in control of everything, don’t we? - The positive attitude and liveliness of a person can completely fool a whole audience of highly educated specialists. If you ever heard motivational speakers and got inspired by their ideas… well, chances are that you’ve also experienced the Dr. Fox effect. - If you’ve ever felt self-conscious leaving your house in different socks, worrying that everyone would laugh and point fingers at you, you’ve become a victim of the spotlight effect. It’s a psychological bias that basically makes you think too much of yourself. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Stock materials (photos, footages and other): https://www.depositphotos.com https://www.shutterstock.com https://www.eastnews.ru ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 406847 BRIGHT SIDE
Qualitative vs. Quantitative
 
09:03
Let's go on a journey and look at the basic characteristics of qualitative and quantitative research!
Views: 805553 ChrisFlipp