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C++ Qt Game Tutorial 3 - Shooting With the Spacebar
 
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We learn how to spawn a moving projectile, aka a "bullet". We cover QTimer, QObject, Q_OBJECT macro and Signals and Slots. Code for this tutorial: https://github.com/MeLikeyCode/QtGameTutorial/tree/master/tutorial3
Views: 42890 Abdullah Aghazadah
C++ Qt 81 - QGraphicsView and QGraphicsScene
 
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These videos are a bit outdated - I am in the process of replacing these with courses on Udemy.com Below are links for the courses I have finished so far. (I will be making much much more) Qt Core Beginners https://www.udemy.com/qt-core-for-beginners/?couponCode=YOUTUBE100K QT Core Intermediate https://www.udemy.com/qt-core-intermediate/?couponCode=YOUTUBE100K Learn how to make complex image objects using the QGraphicsView
Views: 138178 VoidRealms
C++ Qt 98 - How to use a DLL
 
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These videos are a bit outdated - I am in the process of replacing these with courses on Udemy.com Below are links for the courses I have finished so far. (I will be making much much more) Qt Core Beginners https://www.udemy.com/qt-core-for-beginners/?couponCode=YOUTUBE100K QT Core Intermediate https://www.udemy.com/qt-core-intermediate/?couponCode=YOUTUBE100K Learn how to use the DLL files you create
Views: 50038 VoidRealms
Using OpenCV on Qt Creator 3.2 (Qt 5.3)
 
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Read full post: http://bit.ly/1wqwUe7 Playlist - OpenCV for Beginners: http://bit.ly/1Edch7t Using OpenCV 3.0.0 alpha on Qt Creator 3.2 (Qt 5.3) This video shows: 0:04 - Downloading and Installing Qt 5.3 1:32 - Creating a Project on Qt Creator 3.2 1:58 - Linking OpenCV to Qt Creator 3.2 3:07 - Building and Running a Sample Contact: [email protected]
Views: 72368 Rodrigo Berriel
CppCon 2016: “A lock-free concurrency toolkit for deferred reclamation and optimistic speculation"
 
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http://CppCon.org — Presentation Slides, PDFs, Source Code and other presenter materials are available at: https://github.com/cppcon/cppcon2016 — Paul E. McKenney, Maged Michael, & Michael Wong This talk introduces the concept of a Concurrency Toolkit that contains the proposed lock-free algorithms on Hazard Pointers and Read-Copy_Update and analyzes their motivation, while showing where they can be useful and their performance differences. Under optimistic concurrency, threads may use shared resources concurrently with other threads that may make such resources unavailable for further use. Care must be taken to reclaim such resources only after it is guaranteed that no threads are concurrently using them or will subsequently use them. More specifically, concurrent dynamic data structures that employ optimistic concurrency allow threads to access dynamic objects concurrently with threads that may remove such objects. Without proper precautions, it is generally unsafe to reclaim the removed objects, as they may yet be accessed by threads that hold references to them. Solutions for the safe reclamation problem can also be used to prevent the ABA problem, a common problem under optimistic concurrency. There are several methods for safe deferred reclamation. The main methods are garbage collection, reference counting, RCU (read-copy-update), and hazard pointers. Each method has its pros and cons and none of the methods provides the best features in all cases. Therefore, it is desirable to offer users the opportunity to choose the most suitable methods for their use cases. This talk will show why we are considering their inclusion (with the exception of garbage collection) in future C++ Standards under SG14/SG1 into the Concurrency TS. — Paul E. McKenney IBM Linux Technology Center Distinguished Engineer Hillsboro, OR, USA Websiterdrop.com/~paulmck Paul E. McKenney has been coding for almost four decades, more than half of that on parallel hardware, where his work has earned him a reputation among some as a flaming heretic. Over the past decade, Paul has been an IBM Distinguished Engineer at the IBM Linux Technology Center. Paul maintains the RCU implementation within the Linux kernel, where the variety of workloads present highly entertaining performance, scalability, real-time response, and energy-efficiency challenges. Prior to that, he worked on the DYNIX/ptx kernel at Sequent, and prior to that on packet-radio and Internet protocols (but long before it was polite to mention Internet at cocktail parties), system administration, business applications, and real-time systems. His hobbies include what passes for running at his age along with the usual house-wife-and-kids habit. Maged Michael Facebook New York Maged Michael is a software engineer at Facebook. He is the inventor of hazard pointers, lock-free malloc and several algorithms for concurrent data structures. His work is included in several IBM products where he was a Research Staff Member at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center. He received a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Rochester. He is an ACM Distinguished Scientist and an ACM Distinguished Speaker. He is an elected member of the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering. He received the 2014 ACM SIGPLAN Most Influential PLDI Paper Award for his paper on Scalable Lock-Free Dynamic Memory Allocation. Michael Wong Codeplay Software/ISOCPP VP of R&D/Director Michael Wong is the CEO of OpenMP. He is the Canadian representative to the C++ Standard and OpenMP Committee. He is also a Director of ISOCPP.org and a VP, Vice-Chair of Programming Languages for Canada’s Standard Council. He has so many titles, it’s a wonder he can get anything done. He chairs the WG21 SG5 Transactional Memory and SG14 Games Development/Low Latency, and is the co-author of a number C++11/OpenMP/Transactional Memory features including generalized attributes, user-defined literals, inheriting constructors, weakly ordered memory models, and explicit conversion operators. Having been the past C++ team lead to IBM’s XL C++ compiler means he has been messing around with designing C++ compilers for twenty years. His current research interest, i.e. what he would like to do if he had time is in the area of parallel programming, transactional memory, C++ benchmark performance, object model, generic programming and template metaprogramming. He holds a B.Sc from University of Toronto, and a Masters in Mathematics from University of Waterloo. He has been asked to speak at ACCU, C++Now, Meeting C++, ADC++, CASCON, Bloomberg, CERN, and many Universities, research centers and companies. — Videos Filmed & Edited by Bash Films: http://www.BashFilms.com
Views: 3065 CppCon
AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute and ImportError: No module named Python
 
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This video covers the AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute and ImportError: No module name errors in Python
Views: 53456 sentdex
Hello World Qt, hand made from Empty qmake Project.
 
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Hello World Qt, hand made from Empty qmake Project. http://qteveloper.blogspot.com/2015/10/hello-world-qt-hand-made-from-empty.html
Views: 3756 Qt Eric
CppCon 2017: Louis Brandy “Curiously Recurring C++ Bugs at Facebook”
 
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http://CppCon.org — Presentation Slides, PDFs, Source Code and other presenter materials are available at: https://github.com/CppCon/CppCon2017 — I've spent the last few years watching Facebook's C++ codebase grow by several orders of magnitude. Despite constantly improving abstractions, constantly improving tooling, frequent internal courses, and ongoing internal discussion, there are bug-patterns we simply cannot stop from being reintroduced into our code. My hope is to show some of the most common (and infamous) bugs in our history, and the surprising complexity that arises in some apparently simple situations. This talk serves the dual purpose of educating the intermediate (and perhaps the occasional advanced) C++ programmer about some really nasty common pitfalls, as well as serves as a plea to experts to help further improve the language, libraries, and best practices to help educate and eradicate some of these problematic patterns. — Louis Brandy: Engineering Director, Facebook My team is responsible for the overall health of the Facebook C++ codebase, both the tools and the libraries. We work on: compilers, static/dynamic analysis, linters, large scale changes, and the core libraries. — Videos Filmed & Edited by Bash Films: http://www.BashFilms.com
Views: 37046 CppCon
C++ Play Sound on Windows
 
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Demonstrates setting up a Visual C++ project file to play a sound.
Views: 80765 profgustin
Qt Tutorials -  Integrating OpenCV in a Qt application [part 4]
 
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Check my blog: http://projectsfromhellandmore.blogspot.de/2016/02/qt-tutorials-integrating-opencv-in-qt.html Last part of this tutorial where I show a demo of the working application, discuss a few of its aspects and then wrap up everything while talking about future projects. Content of this tutorial: Part 1 - https://youtu.be/vKIEzqmeajQ Part 2 - https://youtu.be/nk7ajLBBsjc Part 3 - https://youtu.be/bG7aNiO0Y04 Part 4 - https://youtu.be/5sOiGJRyoBI
Views: 6132 rbaleksandar
sound function in c
 
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use of sound function in c& fun with sound function present in dos.h header file
CppCon 2018: “Grill the Committee”
 
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http://CppCon.org — Presentation Slides, PDFs, Source Code and other presenter materials are available at: https://github.com/CppCon/CppCon2018 — What would you like to know about the C++ standard? Join us for a panel discussion with the leaders of the C++ standards committee where the audience asks the questions. — Jon Kalb, Jon Kalb, Consulting Conference Chair Jon Kalb is a freelance C++ instructor and chairs CppCon, C++ Now, and the Boost Steering Committee. He is a director and the treasurer of the C++ Alliance. He has been programming in C++ for over 25 years and has written C++ for Amazon, Apple, Dow Chemical, Intuit, Lotus, Microsoft, Netscape, Sun, and Yahoo! Marshall Clow, Qualcomm Marshall has been programming professionally for 35 yearsHe is the author of Boost.Algorithm, and has been a contributor to Boost for more than 15 years. He is the chairman of the Library working group of the C++ standard committee. He is the lead developer for libc++, the C++ standard library for LLVM. Olivier Giroux, NVIDIA Olivier Giroux has worked on nine GPU and five SM architecture generations released by NVIDIA. Lately, he works to clarify the forms and semantics of valid GPU programs, present and future. He was the programming model lead for the NVIDIA Volta architecture. He is the chair of SG1, the Concurrency study group of the ISO C++ committee, and is a passionate contributor to C++'s forward progress guarantees and memory model. Howard Hinnant Ripple Bjarne Stroustrup, MorganStanley dization, future; performance, reliability; software developer education; distributed systems Bio: www.stroustrup.com/bio.html Herb Sutter, Microsoft Author, and chair of the ISO C++ committee. Ville Voutilainen, Qt Company Ville Voutilainen is the Chair of the Evolution Working Group, and also a gcc/libstdc++ developer. He's the Finnish representative in the C++ committee, and has contributed to numerous C++11 and C++14 facilities, including override/final, lambda init-captures, aggregate NSDMIs, and more. Titus Winters, Google C++ Codebase Cultivator Titus Winters has spent the past 6 years working on Google's core C++ libraries. He's particularly interested in issues of large scale software engineer and codebase maintenance: how do we keep a codebase of over 100M lines of code consistent and flexible for the next decade? Along the way he has helped Google teams pioneer techniques to perform automated code transformations on a massive scale, and helps maintain the Google C++ Style Guide. — Videos Filmed & Edited by Bash Films: http://www.BashFilms.com
Views: 3854 CppCon
Error 404 not found - The Requested URL was Not Found on This Server
 
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This video shows "How to solve error 404 in Windows and other operating system". It also showing other information about Error 404. Error 404 is a normal error. It may occur when you are trying to access wrong URL. It may be possible that you that page you are accessing is moved to other URL or removed. Stay Connected: -------------------------- Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/trickstable/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ketan7529 Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/106634414... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/techketan/ Visit My site: http://www.trickstable.com
Views: 310012 KP Geek
CppCon 2018: Jason Turner “Surprises in Object Lifetime”
 
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http://CppCon.org — Presentation Slides, PDFs, Source Code and other presenter materials are available at: https://github.com/CppCon/CppCon2018 — One of the main defining features of C++ is that of well defined object lifetime. We know that when a scope exits any local variables will be properly cleaned up. This is something that we rely upon and use regularly for the management of resources (ie RAII). However, there are some corners of the language that challenge our understanding of object lifetime. I have been teaching classes on understanding object lifetime for over a year now and some of these places continue to surprise my students and have even surprised me. We will explore these corners of C++ and ask if they cause enough concern that the language features should not be used, or if they are still worth the price? We will also ponder if these can be considered mistakes in the language or just side effects of a useful feature. We will also explore when and how the compiler and analyzers can warn on these issues. — Jason Turner Developer, Trainer, Speaker Host of C++Weekly https://www.youtube.com/c/JasonTurner-lefticus, Co-host of CppCast http://cppcast.com, Co-creator and maintainer of the embedded scripting language for C++, ChaiScript http://chaiscript.com, and author and curator of the forkable coding standards document http://cppbestpractices.com. I'm available for contracting and onsite training. — Videos Filmed & Edited by Bash Films: http://www.BashFilms.com
Views: 11446 CppCon
CppCon 2018: Herb Sutter “Thoughts on a more powerful and simpler C++ (5 of N)”
 
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http://CppCon.org — Presentation Slides, PDFs, Source Code and other presenter materials are available at: https://github.com/CppCon/CppCon2018 — Perhaps the most important thing we can do for C++ at this point in its evolution is to make sure we preserve its core strengths while also directing its evolution in ways that make it simpler to use. That is my own opinion at least, so this talk starts with a perspective question: What “is C++,” really? The language continues to evolve and change; as it does so, how can we be sure we’re picking C++ evolutionary improvements that not only don’t lose its “C++-ic” qualities, but make it a better C++ than ever? At recent CppCons, I’ve spoken about several of my own personal C++ evolution efforts and experiments, and why I think they’re potentially important directions to explore for making C++ both more powerful and also simpler to use. The bulk of the talk is updates on two of these: 1. Lifetime and dangling: At CppCon 2015, Bjarne Stroustrup and I launched The C++ Core Guidelines in our plenary talks. In my part starting at 29:06, I gave an early look at my work on the Guidelines “Lifetime” profile, an approach for diagnosing many common cases of pointer/iterator dangling at compile time, with demos in an early MSVC-based prototype. For this year’s CppCon, I’ll cover what’s new, including: • use-after-move diagnoses • better support for the standard library out of the box without annotation • more complete implementations in two compilers: in MSVC as a static analysis extension, and in a Clang-based implementation that is efficient enough to run during normal compilation • the complete 1.0 Lifetime specification being released on the Guidelines’ GitHub repo this month I’ll summarize the highlights but focus on what’s new, so I recommend rewatching that talk video as a refresher for background for this year’s session. 2. Metaclasses: In my CppCon 2017 talk, I gave an early look at my “metaclasses” proposal to use compile-time reflection and compile-time generation to make authoring classes both more powerful and also simpler. In this case, “simpler” means not only eliminating a lot of tedious boilerplate, but also eliminating many common sources of errors and bugs. For this year, we’ll cover what’s new, including: • an update on the Clang-based implementation, which now supports more use cases including function parameter lists • new examples, including from domains like concurrency • an updated P0707 paper, with more links to working examples live on Godbolt, being posted in the next few weeks for the pre-San Diego committee mailing — Herb Sutter Microsoft Author, and chair of the ISO C++ committee. — Videos Filmed & Edited by Bash Films: http://www.BashFilms.com
Views: 36740 CppCon
CppCon 2017: Bjarne Stroustrup “Learning and Teaching Modern C++”
 
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http://CppCon.org — Presentation Slides, PDFs, Source Code and other presenter materials are available at: https://github.com/CppCon/CppCon2017 — We – attendees at CppCon – are all teachers. Some teach for a living; many occasionally teach a course or give a lecture; essentially all give advice about how to learn C++ or how to use C++. The communities we address are incredibly diverse. What do we teach, and why? Who do we teach, and how? What is “modern C++”? How do we avoid pushing our own mistakes onto innocent learners? Teaching C++ implies a view of what C++ is; there is no value-neutral teaching. What teaching tools and support do we need? Consider libraries, compiler support, and tools for learners. This talk asks a lot of questions and offers a few answers. Its aim is to start a discussion, so the Q&A will be relatively long. — Bjarne Stroustrup - Managing Director,, Morgan Stanley C++: history, design, use, standardization, future; performance, reliability; software developer education; | distributed systems — Videos Filmed & Edited by Bash Films: http://www.BashFilms.com
Views: 129687 CppCon
CppCon 2018: Borislav Stanimirov “DynaMix: A New Take on Polymorphism”
 
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http://CppCon.org — Presentation Slides, PDFs, Source Code and other presenter materials are available at: https://github.com/CppCon/CppCon2018 — Software with very complex business logic, such as games, CAD systems, and enterprise systems, often needs to compose and modify objects at runtime - for example to add or override a method in an existing object. Standard C++ has rigid types which are defined at compile time and make this hard. On the other hand languages with dynamic types like lua, Python, and JavaScript make this very easy. Therefore, to keep the code readable and maintainable, and accomplish complex business logic requirements, many projects use such languages alongside C++. Some drawbacks of this approach include the added complexity in a language binding layer, the performance loss from using an interpreted language, and the inevitable code duplication for many small utility functionalities. DynaMix is a library which attempts to remove, or at least greatly reduce, the need for a separate scripting language by allowing the users to compose and modify polymorphic objects at runtime in C++. This talk will elaborate on this problem and introduce the library and its key features to potential users or people who might benefit form the approach with an annotated example and a small demo. — Borislav Stanimirov, Bulgaria Borislav has been a C++ programmer for 15 years. In the past 11 he has been programming video games. He has worked on C++ software for all kinds of platforms: desktops, mobile devices, servers, and embedded. His main interests are software architecture and design, and programming languages. — Videos Filmed & Edited by Bash Films: http://www.BashFilms.com
Views: 2830 CppCon
CppCon 2017: Titus Winters “C++ as a "Live at Head" Language”
 
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http://CppCon.org — Presentation Slides, PDFs, Source Code and other presenter materials are available at: https://github.com/CppCon/CppCon2017 — Engineering is programming integrated over time. That is to say, as much as it can be difficult to get your code to build and run correctly, it is manifestly harder to keep it working in the face of changing assumptions and requirements. This is true no matter the scale, from a small program to a shared library. Only two solutions have been shown to be theoretically sound: never change or provide no compatibility guarantees. What if there were a third option? What if we took the question of maintenance out of the realm of theory and moved it to practice? This talk discusses the approach we've used at Google and how that intersects with other languages, package management, API and ABI compatibility, and a host of other software engineering practices. The particulars of C++ as a language and an ecosystem make it well positioned for a different approach: Live at Head. — Titus Winters: Google, C++ Codebase Cultivator, NYC Titus Winters has spent the past 6 years working on Google's core C++ libraries. He's particularly interested in issues of large scale software engineer and codebase maintenance: how do we keep a codebase of over 100M lines of code consistent and flexible for the next decade? Along the way he has helped Google teams pioneer techniques to perform automated code transformations on a massive scale, and helps maintain the Google C++ Style Guide. — Videos Filmed & Edited by Bash Films: http://www.BashFilms.com
Views: 28180 CppCon
CppCon 2018: Juan Pedro Bolivar Puente “The Most Valuable Values”
 
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http://CppCon.org — Presentation Slides, PDFs, Source Code and other presenter materials are available at: https://github.com/CppCon/CppCon2018 — The modern C++ community puts a strong emphasis on value semantics. We know how to build types and algorithms thinking in terms of values, their properties and relationships. However, when it gets to the big picture—the architecture—we end up growing ad-hoc webs of mutable objects that perform poorly and are hard to understand, debug and maintain. In this talk, we'll learn what value semantics are about in a fundamental way. We'll then use values where they matter most: the architectural foundations of our system! As an example, we'll present the Unidirectional Data Flow Architecture, that is changing how people build interactive software. We'll show some patterns, examples and tools that make it easy to implement, and efficient to execute. We will also present Lager, a library that implements such architecture and augments value-based programs with time-travel capabilities! Links: https://github.com/arximboldi/lager https://github.com/arximboldi/immer https://github.com/arximboldi/ewig — Juan Pedro Bolivar Puente, Independent (Sinusoidal Engineering) Consultant Juanpe is a Berlin based freelance software engineer, with a focus on interactive software, modern C++, functional programming and open source strategy. Before he worked for Ableton and he has been involved in various music technology projects. He has also developed for the GNU project and cofounded a Hacklab in Granada. — Videos Filmed & Edited by Bash Films: http://www.BashFilms.com
Views: 2189 CppCon
CppCon 2017: Roel Standaert “Migrating a C++03 library to C++11 case study: Wt 4”
 
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http://CppCon.org — Presentation Slides, PDFs, Source Code and other presenter materials are available at: https://github.com/CppCon/CppCon2017 — In this talk, we will describe the effort of migrating the API of a reasonably large open source library to C++11. During the migration we wanted to benefit from as many new C++ features as possible, while preserving the semantics and features of the library. We will present various trade-offs in choosing a smart pointer strategy that was compatible with the existing object ownership model. The signal/slot mechanism, formerly based on boost.signals, was simplified and replaced by an implementation relying on lambdas, std::function and std::bind. Many smaller helper classes such as Boost.Any, Boost.Date_Time, and others were replaced by their standard counterparts. The minimum requirements of Wt 4 are C++11, but we will describe how C++14/17 are used if the compiler supports them. The main benefit of this transition is that the Wt API became more self-explaining, compilation times have been reduced, run-time performance improved, and the library's user requires less knowledge of boost. We will also discuss secondary consequences of the transition, such as simpler stack traces and the impact on compiler errors. Wt is an open source widget-based web GUI library, first released in 2006. Before C++11 came around, Wt could be considered to be written in a modern style C++, relying as much as possible on the standard library and using boost libraries for missing C++ features. Wt 4 is the next major release of the library, fully embracing C++11. Visit https://www.webtoolkit.eu for more information. — Roel Standaert: Emweb Roel is a software developer at Emweb, the company that markets Wt, the C++ web toolkit. Roel holds a Master's degree in computer science from the University of Leuven. — Videos Filmed & Edited by Bash Films: http://www.BashFilms.com
Views: 3375 CppCon
Life's Too Short - Write Fast Code (part 2)
 
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Google Tech Talks Web Exponents presented by Steve Souders March 5, 2009 blog post: http://google-code-updates.blogspot.com/2009/03/steve-souders-lifes-too-short-write.html This is the second talk based on Steve's next book, Even Faster Web Sites, the follows-up to High Performance Web Sites. The first talk presented three new best practices: Split the Initial Payload, Load Scripts Without Blocking, and Don't Scatter Inline Scripts. The most important of these is loading external scripts without blocking other downloads and preventing page rendering. One complication is this may introduce undefined symbol errors if inlined code uses symbols from the external scripts. Luckily, there are several techniques to workaround this problem. That and other topics will be covered in this presentation of three more best practices: * Coupling Asynchronous Scripts * Use Iframes Sparingly * Flush the Document Early Speaker: Steve Souders Steve Souders works at Google on web performance and open source initiatives, and previously served as the Chief Performance Yahoo!. He also co-founded Helix Systems and CoolSync, and worked at General Magic, WhoWhere?, and Lycos. Steve is the creator of YSlow, the performance analysis extension to Firebug, which has over 700,000 downloads. He serves as co-chair of Velocity, the web performance and operations conference from OReilly, and is co-founder of the Firebug Working Group. He recently taught High Performance Web Sites at Stanford University. The topics from part 1 can be seen here: http://sites.google.com/site/io/even-faster-web-sites
Views: 127610 GoogleTechTalks
C++ Win32 API Basic Play Wav Sound
 
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.Using Dev C++ 5.4.1 .Made by C++ & Win32 API .Just for fun .Example demonstrates how to play simple wav sound file. .No video sound here.
Views: 6261 encryptor256
D-Bus
 
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D-Bus is an inter-process communication and remote procedure call mechanism that allows communication between multiple computer programs concurrently running on the same machine. D-Bus was designed as part of the effort of the freedesktop.org project to standardize services provided by Linux desktop environments such as GNOME and KDE. The freedesktop.org project also developed a free and open-source software library called libdbus, as a reference implementation of the specification. This library is often confused with the D-Bus itself. Other implementations of D-Bus also exist, such as GDBus, QtDBus, dbus-java and sd-bus. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 4969 Audiopedia
Auburn Coach Wife Kristi Malzahn Agrees with Match & eHarmony: Men are Jerks
 
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My advice is this: Settle! That's right. Don't worry about passion or intense connection. Don't nix a guy based on his annoying habit of yelling "Bravo!" in movie theaters. Overlook his halitosis or abysmal sense of aesthetics. Because if you want to have the infrastructure in place to have a family, settling is the way to go. Based on my observations, in fact, settling will probably make you happier in the long run, since many of those who marry with great expectations become more disillusioned with each passing year. (It's hard to maintain that level of zing when the conversation morphs into discussions about who's changing the diapers or balancing the checkbook.) Obviously, I wasn't always an advocate of settling. In fact, it took not settling to make me realize that settling is the better option, and even though settling is a rampant phenomenon, talking about it in a positive light makes people profoundly uncomfortable. Whenever I make the case for settling, people look at me with creased brows of disapproval or frowns of disappointment, the way a child might look at an older sibling who just informed her that Jerry's Kids aren't going to walk, even if you send them money. It's not only politically incorrect to get behind settling, it's downright un-American. Our culture tells us to keep our eyes on the prize (while our mothers, who know better, tell us not to be so picky), and the theme of holding out for true love (whatever that is—look at the divorce rate) permeates our collective mentality. Even situation comedies, starting in the 1970s with The Mary Tyler Moore Show and going all the way to Friends, feature endearing single women in the dating trenches, and there's supposed to be something romantic and even heroic about their search for true love. Of course, the crucial difference is that, whereas the earlier series begins after Mary has been jilted by her fiancé, the more modern-day Friends opens as Rachel Green leaves her nice-guy orthodontist fiancé at the altar simply because she isn't feeling it. But either way, in episode after episode, as both women continue to be unlucky in love, settling starts to look pretty darn appealing. Mary is supposed to be contentedly independent and fulfilled by her newsroom family, but in fact her life seems lonely. Are we to assume that at the end of the series, Mary, by then in her late 30s, found her soul mate after the lights in the newsroom went out and her work family was disbanded? If her experience was anything like mine or that of my single friends, it's unlikely. And while Rachel and her supposed soul mate, Ross, finally get together (for the umpteenth time) in the finale of Friends, do we feel confident that she'll be happier with Ross than she would have been had she settled down with Barry, the orthodontist, 10 years earlier? She and Ross have passion but have never had long-term stability, and the fireworks she experiences with him but not with Barry might actually turn out to be a liability, given how many times their relationship has already gone up in flames. It's equally questionable whether Sex and the City's Carrie Bradshaw, who cheated on her kindhearted and generous boyfriend, Aidan, only to end up with the more exciting but self-absorbed Mr. Big, will be better off in the framework of marriage and family. (Some time after the breakup, when Carrie ran into Aidan on the street, he was carrying his infant in a Baby Björn. Can anyone imagine Mr. Big walking around with a Björn?)
Views: 195089 Shari Wing

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