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The Articles of Confederation - Becoming the United States - Extra History - #1
 
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When the thirteen colonies of North America broke away from Great Britain, they struggled to draft their first constitution. After great debate, they created the Articles of Confederation and formed the United States of America. Support us on Patreon! http://bit.ly/EHPatreon (--More below) Grab your Extra Credits gear at the store! http://bit.ly/ExtraStore Subscribe for new episodes every Saturday! http://bit.ly/SubToEC Play games with us on Extra Play! http://bit.ly/WatchEXP Talk to us on Twitter (@ExtraCreditz): http://bit.ly/ECTweet Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/ECFBPage Get our list of recommended games on Steam: http://bit.ly/ECCurator ____________ ♪ Get the intro music here! http://bit.ly/1EQA5N7 *Music by Demetori: http://bit.ly/1AaJG4H ♪ Get the outro music here! http://bit.ly/23isQfx *Music by Sean and Dean Kiner: http://bit.ly/1WdBhnm
Views: 1187869 Extra Credits
The Articles of Confederation - The Constitution Before the Constitution
 
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→Subscribe for new videos every day! https://www.youtube.com/user/TodayIFoundOut?sub_confirmation=1 →How "Dick" came to be short for 'Richard': https://youtu.be/BH1NAwwKtcg?list=PLR0XuDegDqP2Acy6g9Ta7hzC0Rr3RDS6q Never run out of things to say at the water cooler with TodayIFoundOut! Brand new videos 7 days a week! More from TodayIFoundOut The Nazis, The British Accent, and BBC News https://youtu.be/_hRQq5e7Wi0?list=PLR0XuDegDqP3-uys3Rl2dvdsFkk96zRbt The Truth About Double Jeopardy https://youtu.be/Tgjip92-ZMg?list=PLR0XuDegDqP0GESJ0DgpgTcThLJVEbFs8 In this video: For four hot, humid July days, 56 delegates of the Second Continental Congress gathered in Philadelphia with one purpose – to ratify the Declaration of Independence. The document, originally drafted by Thomas Jefferson with the help of Ben Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, ad Robert Livingston, declared that the thirteen American colonies were now independent and free of the tyranny of the British Empire. On July 4th, with the final wording in place, it was ready for the whole world to read; though, it would be about another month before congress would actually sign it, contrary to popular belief. Want the text version?: http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/12/articles-confederation-constitution-constitution/ Sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Articles_of_Confederation http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/ourdocs/articles.html http://history.state.gov/milestones/1776-1783/Articles http://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/artconf.asp http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Declaration_of_Independence http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Revolutionary_War http://books.google.com/books?id=pFXLAMC1xtUC&q=127#v=snippet&q=127&f=false http://www.cliffsnotes.com/more-subjects/american-government/the-constitution/the-articles-of-confederation http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shays%27_Rebellion http://johncashon.wordpress.com/2013/03/18/shays-rebellion-and-the-articles-of-confederation/ http://huntingtonhomestead.org/birthdate.html
Views: 88040 Today I Found Out
The Articles of Confederation Explained: U.S. History Review
 
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A review of our first Constitution, the AOC. What were the Articles of Confederation? How did it run the United States? Why did the Articles of Confederation fail? Mr. Hughes explains the basics of the Articles of Confederation including the reasons for its eventual demise. Check out the US Playlist for hundreds of videos! Now go subscribe! https://www.youtube.com/user/hughesDV/featured
Views: 304834 Hip Hughes
What Were the Articles of Confederation? | History
 
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Before the U.S. Constitution was the law of the land, there were the Articles of Confederation. Find out why they didn't last long. Newsletter: https://www.history.com/newsletter Website - http://www.history.com /posts Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/History Twitter - https://twitter.com/history HISTORY Topical Video Season 1 Whether you're looking for more on American Revolution battles, WWII generals, architectural wonders, secrets of the ancient world, U.S. presidents, Civil War leaders, famous explorers or the stories behind your favorite holidays. HISTORY®, now reaching more than 98 million homes, is the leading destination for award-winning original series and specials that connect viewers with history in an informative, immersive, and entertaining manner across all platforms. The network’s all-original programming slate features a roster of hit series, epic miniseries, and scripted event programming. Visit us at HISTORY.com for more info.
Views: 94768 HISTORY
The Constitution, the Articles, and Federalism: Crash Course US History #8
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the United States Constitution. During and after the American Revolutionary War, the government of the new country operated under the Articles of Confederation. While these Articles got the young nation through its war with England, they weren't of much use when it came to running a country. So, the founding fathers decided try their hand at nation-building, and they created the Constitution of the United States, which you may remember as the one that says We The People at the top. John will tell you how the convention came together, some of the compromises that had to be made to pass this thing, and why it's very lucky that the framers installed a somewhat reasonable process for making changes to the thing. You'll learn about Shays' Rebellion, the Federalist Papers, the elite vs rabble dynamic of the houses of congress, and start to find out just what an anti-federalist is. Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode.Founding Fathers debated over how to govern the new nation, beginning with the Articles of Confederation: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/articles-of-confederation When the Founding Fathers finally wrote the Constitution, they realized that they needed to add The Bill of Rights to get citizens on board with the new government: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-bill-of-rights Follow us: http://www.twitter.com/thecrashcourse http://www.twitter.com/realjohngreen http://www.twitter.com/raoulmeyer http://www.twitter.com/crashcoursestan http://www.twitter.com/saysdanica http://www.twitter.com/thoughtbubbler Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 4465674 CrashCourse
The Articles of Confederation | Period 3: 1754-1800 | AP US History | Khan Academy
 
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Before the United States had the Constitution, it had the Articles of Confederation, a much weaker government that lasted from 1777 to 1789. In this video, Kim and Leah discuss the pros and cons of the Articles, and the reasons they were discarded in favor of a new Constitution. View more lessons or practice this subject at https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/us-history/road-to-revolution/creating-a-nation/v/the-articles-of-confederation?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc&utm_campaign=apushistory Khan Academy is a nonprofit organization with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We offer quizzes, questions, instructional videos, and articles on a range of academic subjects, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, history, economics, finance, grammar, preschool learning, and more. We provide teachers with tools and data so they can help their students develop the skills, habits, and mindsets for success in school and beyond. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 15 million people around the globe learn on Khan Academy every month. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, we would love your help! Donate or volunteer today! Donate here: https://www.khanacademy.org/donate?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc Volunteer here: https://www.khanacademy.org/contribute?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc
Views: 73454 Khan Academy
Articles of Confederation (Kelis's "Milkshake" Parody) - @MrBettsClass
 
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Can Alexander Hamilton bring the delegates to the yard in order to fix the Articles of Confederation? New videos every Tuesday (sometimes Monday!) Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/MrBettsClass Instagram: http://instagram.com/MrBettsClass Tumblr: http://http://mrbettsclass.tumblr.com/ Like on FaceBook: http://facebook.com/MrBettsClass "En la Brisa" Music by Dan-O at http://DanoSongs.com The Articles of Confederation are flawed, With no new amendments because, We'd need a unanimous charge, Which I tell you is impossibly hard, The Articles of Confederation are flawed, We can't tax, the states disregard, No strength to enforce the laws, This government is big faux pas, It was the country's, First Constitution, Passed in the Revolution, but Made states too strong, Fed's powers none, It's pretty dumb, We can declare war, but who will fight it? We can't force people to join the army, We can print money, so can the states, What good's a dollar that no one's taking, The Articles of Confederation are flawed, Congress can't regulate commerce, It's made the economy worse, States are putting tariffs on each other, The Articles of Confederation are flawed, To ensure limited power, Goes to the central gov, Made a system which simply does not work, There's only one branch, The Legislative, Unicameral, where is the Executive, And Justices, It's powerless, Just to pass a bill, need 9 of 13, States to approve it, won't hold my breath, People know it's weak, in Massachusetts, The Shays' Rebellion, we barely stopped it, The Articles of Confederation are flawed, I say this in Annapolis, To discuss a better system, We must meet in '87, The Articles of Confederation are flawed, Let's meet in Philadelphia, At Independence Hall, Where we will write a new Constitution!
Views: 230594 MrBettsClass
The Articles of the Confederation
 
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Our Social Studies project on the articles of confederation. We are pretty bad actors so please dont laugh at us.... also at the beginning of the video we are trying to sit like "men"
What was the Articles of Confederation? | US Government and Civics | Khan Academy
 
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John Dickerson discusses the history and the significance of the Articles of Confederation. John Dickerson is co-host of CBS This Morning. He was previously CBS News' Chief Washington Correspondent, Political Director and anchor of Face The Nation. Dickerson is also a contributor to Slate's Political Gabfest and to The Atlantic. During the 2016 presidential campaign, Dickerson moderated CBS News' two presidential debates. Prior to CBS, Dickerson was Slate Magazine's Chief Political correspondent and covered politics for twelve years for Time magazine. View more lessons or practice this subject at https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/us-government-and-civics/government-civics-with-cbss-john-dickerson Khan Academy is a nonprofit organization with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We offer quizzes, questions, instructional videos, and articles on a range of academic subjects, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, history, economics, finance, grammar, preschool learning, and more. We provide teachers with tools and data so they can help their students develop the skills, habits, and mindsets for success in school and beyond. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 15 million people around the globe learn on Khan Academy every month. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, we would love your help! Donate or volunteer today! Donate here: https://www.khanacademy.org/donate?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc Volunteer here: https://www.khanacademy.org/contribute?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc
Views: 4956 Khan Academy
Articles of Confederation #1
 
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- Continental Congress - Loose confederation of autonomous states - No executive, nor judicial branch - Weak central government - Ratification
Our Living Breathing Constitution
 
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1776 The start of U.S.A. This is our 4th of July. This broke a cycle of rising and falling nations. Articles of Confederation The Continental Congress adopted the Articles of Confederation, the first constitution of the United States, on November 15, 1777. However, ratification of the Articles of Confederation by all thirteen states did not occur until March 1, 1781. U.S. Constitution The U.S. Constitution was adopted and signed in September 1787, but signing wasn't enough. It had to be ratified by nine of the 13 states before it became binding. That happened when New Hampshire ratified it on June 21, 1788. Under U.S. Constitution "We the People" had a Republic. That means "Rule of Law" government. Progressive era Constitution / the Living Breathing Constitution 1913 – a Living Breathing Constitution? Is it? Could be, since 1913. that is when Democracy, which is the stepping stone to Communism, got it's start in the U.S.A. The 17th Amendment facilitated the Living Constitution/Progressive movement. Once Democracy was in place and the Rule of Law was set aside, the Left/Communists were free to do as they pleased. Under a Living Constitution "We the People" have a Democracy. That means "Ruler's Law" government. That is government by the majority. Read more here https://t.co/gYPy2mRlLc
Views: 83 Marc MoreThan
Why the Articles of Confederation Were Actually a Success
 
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The Articles of Confederation are mostly seen as a failure which created a weak and ineffectual government, soon replaced by the Constitution. In this lecture, professor Paul Gilje tells a different story, and tries to understand how, when seen in context, the Articles were an expression of the values that inspired the Revolution and can help us appreciate the politics of the period.
Views: 2215 OU IACH
What if We Kept the Articles of Confederation?
 
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An in-depth four part series about the Articles of Confederation from Extra Credits!: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6rHSiN0vKk The United States used to be a lot less....united. The states originally wanted to control themselves, and that resulted in the failed Articles of Confederation. But what if we kept them? Twitter: https://twitter.com/AltHistoryHub Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/alternatehistoryhub/?ref=bookmarks Music by Holfix: https://www.youtube.com/user/holfix
Views: 589897 AlternateHistoryHub
Learning Objective One Articles of Confederation
 
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IV. Concept Four:http://www.thisamericanlife.org/play_full.php?play=290&act=1 Click Here for the radio interview What is Isaac Kramnick's, co-author of The Godless Constitution, concerns and how does he address the controversy between religion and government? What was the most controversial aspect of the US Constitution for people living during the time of its ratification? V. Concept Five: http://onpoint.wbur.org/2002/08/20/how-democratic-is-the-american-constitution/player Click Here to hear the story What is undemocratic about the Constitution according professor Dahl? What does Dahl mean that the U.S. Constitution encourages Americans to think undemocratically? What three questions does Professor Dahl ask those who argue that the United States was not intended to be a democracy but a Republic? What is his response? Dahl is critical of the electoral college. Why? What is the basis of the argument supporting the continuation of the electoral college.
Views: 768 Sean Kennedy
The Articles of Confederation - Constitutional Convention - Extra History - #4
 
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What if we kept the Articles of Confederation? The Alternate History Hub explores: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1NTboCDbtk The war finally ended and the United States secured their independence from Great Britain, but immediately their Confederation seemed to be on the verge of falling apart. Alexander Hamilton and James Madison teamed up to organize a new convention where all the states would not just reform the Articles of Confederation, but replace them entirely. Support us on Patreon! http://bit.ly/EHPatreon (--More below) Grab your Extra Credits gear at the store! http://bit.ly/ExtraStore Subscribe for new episodes every Saturday! http://bit.ly/SubToEC _________ Thanks for participating in this week's discussion! We want you to be aware of our community posting guidelines so that we can have high-quality conversations: https://goo.gl/HkzwQh Contribute community subtitles to Extra Credits: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCCODtTcd5M1JavPCOr_Uydg&tab=2 ___________ Play games with us on Extra Play! http://bit.ly/WatchEXP Talk to us on Twitter (@ExtraCreditz): http://bit.ly/ECTweet Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/ECFBPage Get our list of recommended games on Steam: http://bit.ly/ECCurator ____________ ♪ Get the intro music here! http://bit.ly/1EQA5N7 *Music by Demetori: http://bit.ly/1AaJG4H ♪ Get the outro music here! http://bit.ly/23isQfx *Music by Sean and Dean Kiner: http://bit.ly/1WdBhnm
Views: 664166 Extra Credits
What if the US kept the Articles of Confederation?
 
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The Articles of Confederation was an agreement among the 13 founding states that established the United States of America as a confederation of sovereign states and served as its first constitution. Its drafting by the Continental Congress began in mid-1776, and an approved version was sent to the states for ratification in late 1777. The formal ratification by all 13 states was completed in early 1781. Even when not yet ratified, the Articles provided domestic and international legitimacy for the Continental Congress to direct the American Revolutionary War, conduct diplomacy with Europe and deal with territorial issues and Native American relations. Nevertheless, the weakness of the government created by the Articles became a matter of concern for key nationalists. On March 4, 1789, general government under the Articles was replaced with the federal government under the U.S. Constitution. The new Constitution provided for a much stronger federal government with a chief executive (the president), courts, and taxing powers. But what if they were never abolished? How would our world be different? Find out in the video. FOLLOW MY BLOG: http://trackmastertrain.blogspot.com/ LIKE COMMENT SUBSCRIBE :)
The Articles of Confederation - Ratification - Extra History - #2
 
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The Continental Congress sent the Articles of Confederation to the thirteen states for ratification, but Maryland insisted on changes that Virginia rushed to oppose. Meanwhile, the American Revolutionary War raged on. Support us on Patreon! http://bit.ly/EHPatreon (--More below) Grab your Extra Credits gear at the store! http://bit.ly/ExtraStore Subscribe for new episodes every Saturday! http://bit.ly/SubToEC Play games with us on Extra Play! http://bit.ly/WatchEXP Talk to us on Twitter (@ExtraCreditz): http://bit.ly/ECTweet Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/ECFBPage Get our list of recommended games on Steam: http://bit.ly/ECCurator ____________ ♪ Get the intro music here! http://bit.ly/1EQA5N7 *Music by Demetori: http://bit.ly/1AaJG4H ♪ Get the outro music here! http://bit.ly/23isQfx *Music by Sean and Dean Kiner: http://bit.ly/1WdBhnm
Views: 767912 Extra Credits
Articles of Confederation & Free Inhabitants
 
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Let's take a look at the Articles of Confederation, Article IV. I admit I'm not this guy's superior, but I think I'll work in a pinch. Original Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H24sLF3CkMo Source on the Articles of Confederation: http://www.ushistory.org/documents/confederation.htm Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TylerValleGG Support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TylerValleGG
Views: 92693 Tyler Valle
Lessons Learned: The Articles of Confederation
 
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On March 1, 1781, the Articles of Confederation came into effect after Maryland became the thirteenth and final state to ratify them. As the first constitution for the new nation, The Articles established a national legislature but assigned it relatively little power. The individual colonies retained much of their sovereignty, and it soon became clear that such a weak federal government was ineffective. By 1787 the framers had begun writing a new constitution, the one that created the federal government Americans have today. James M. Lindsay, CFR's senior vice president and director of studies, says that this episode in U.S. history points to the difficulty of creating a workable constitution. "It is easy to write a constitution," he says, but "hard to write a constitution that works." This lesson, he argues, should be kept in mind as countries like Egypt, Tunisia, Myanmar, and South Sudan "struggle to create effective and legitimate systems of government." This video is part of Lessons Learned, a series dedicated to exploring historical events and examining their meaning in the context of foreign relations today: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF2F38E5941910270 http://www.cfr.org/us-strategy-and-politics/lessons-learned-articles-confederation/p27505
Why the Articles of Confederation didn't work
 
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You already shknow
Views: 58 Blake Chlouber
The Articles of Confederation - Finding Finances - Extra History - #3
 
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With the newly United States on the verge of bankruptcy, Congress reaches out to the most able financier in the nation: Robert Morris. His ambitious plans attract the aid of Alexander Hamilton, but fall to ruins when the states abandon him. Support us on Patreon! http://bit.ly/EHPatreon (--More below) Grab your Extra Credits gear at the store! http://bit.ly/ExtraStore Subscribe for new episodes every Saturday! http://bit.ly/SubToEC _________ Thanks for participating in this week's discussion! We want you to be aware of our community posting guidelines so that we can have high-quality conversations: https://goo.gl/HkzwQh Contribute community subtitles to Extra Credits: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCCODtTcd5M1JavPCOr_Uydg&tab=2 ___________ Play games with us on Extra Play! http://bit.ly/WatchEXP Talk to us on Twitter (@ExtraCreditz): http://bit.ly/ECTweet Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/ECFBPage Get our list of recommended games on Steam: http://bit.ly/ECCurator ____________ ♪ Get the intro music here! http://bit.ly/1EQA5N7 *Music by Demetori: http://bit.ly/1AaJG4H ♪ Get the outro music here! http://bit.ly/23isQfx *Music by Sean and Dean Kiner: http://bit.ly/1WdBhnm
Views: 689942 Extra Credits
Articles of Confederation vs. U.S. Constitution
 
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Learning Target: I can explain which of the following was most responsible for the success of America: George Washington or The United States Constitution.
Views: 23379 Mr. Wilson
Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation: Explained
 
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💩 AOC Weaknesses 💩 1. ❌ President 👨🏾‍💼 2. ❌ National Court System 👩🏽‍⚖️ 3. ❌ Power to Collect Taxes 💰 4. ❌ Power to Force States to follow Laws 5. 👍🏼 Required 9/13 States to Approve Laws 6. 👍🏼 Required 13/13 States to Approve Amendments
Views: 52 Matthew Kiernan
The Articles of Confederation
 
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The problems with the Articles of Confederation
Views: 1050 Lakerherman
Articles of Confederation ("Celebration" Parody Song) - @MrBettsClass
 
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Stay "kool" and rock out with the beta version of American government: the Articles of Confederation. Confederation, come on! The Articles ain't good (the Articles of...) Confederation, come on! It's time you understood, There's a problem going on right here, With the government we've had for the last six years, We've just got one house and we can't tax too, And we need a unanimous vote just to get something through (it's so horrible) Confederation! The Land and Northwest Ordinances were the only good days of the Articles of Confederation! But nothing else about it works, just ask Daniel Shays It's time for us to come together, Let's meet in Philly in the hot weather, Close the doors let's make a Constitution! New videos every Thursday! Like on FaceBook: http://facebook.com/MrBettsClass Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/MrBettsClass "En la Brisa" Music by Dan-O at http://DanoSongs.com
Views: 46813 MrBettsClass
We Have Not a Government: The Articles of Confederation and the Road to the Constitution
 
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In the years following the end of the American Revolution, the Continental Congress was on the brink of collapse due to the Articles of Confederation and its refusal to consider fundamental reform to the document. In professor George William Van Cleve’s book, We Have Not a Government, we encounter a sharply divided America and a Congress that grudgingly agreed to support the 1787 Constitutional Convention to replace the Articles with a more flexible and powerful government. A book signing will follow the program. Live Captioning: https://www.streamtext.net/player?event=NATA17Oct23
Views: 2392 US National Archives
The Articles of Confederation in One Minute
 
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How it Happened: US History In just one minute (and 20 seconds) this video covers the major info points of the Articles of Confederation, which were a sort of prequel or beta test for the Constitution. Learn what they were, why they were need, and why they ultimately failed. Spoiler: it's all about money. Be sure to subscribe and suggest future topics in the comments.
Views: 88186 How it Happens
Constitutional Compromises: Crash Course Government and Politics #5
 
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In which Craig Benzine teaches you about the compromises met in ratifying the U.S. Constitution. The United State’s didn’t always have its current system of government. Actually, this is it’s second attempt. Craig will delve into the failures (and few successes) of the Articles of Confederation, tell you how delegates settled on a two-house system of representation, discuss the issues of slavery and population that have been imbedded into our constitution, and fire up the clone machine to discuss how federalists and anti-federalist opposition provided the U.S. a Bill of Rights. And who knows, maybe all this talk of compromise will even inspire Craig and eagle to find some middle ground. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Instagram - http://instagram.com/thecrashcourse
Views: 1052972 CrashCourse
The Constitution Song ("Despacito" Parody)
 
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Review the United States Constitution, Preamble and purpose, Articles and Amendments, all to the song of the summer, "Despacito." PrepIT for APUSH and AP GOV Link - http://bit.ly/PrepIT Support MrBettsClass on Patreon - http://bit.ly/PatreonMBC APUSH Shirt - http://bit.ly/MBCAPUSH Historical Parody/Skits every Thursday Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/MrBettsClass Instagram: http://instagram.com/MrBettsClass Like on FaceBook: http://facebook.com/MrBettsClass "En la Brisa" Music by Dan-O at http://DanoSongs.com The Articles of Confederation They be giving us, such frustration, yeah Limits feel like strangulation, yeah Oh, we must meet up in Philadelphia Close the windows and lock the doors We the people of the US in order To form a more perfect Union, provide For the defense, see Justice ain’t denied Promote the general welfare of all our lives Oh, yeah, and to insure domestic Tranquility And to secure the Blessings of Liberty To ourselves and our Posterity (ordain this) Constitution Splitting up the government into three branches Executive, Judicial, and the Legislative Separating powers and insuring balance Constitution Building on the concepts of the Magna Carta Locke, Voltaire, and Baron Montesquieu are borrowed Still James Madison is called its father (What does, what does, what does, what does, it say) Article I’s about the Congress House and Senate They regulate and tax, declare war Writing laws with the elastic clause (Necessary and proper, baby) President and Executive fall under Article II III’s about the Judicial Branch Both of these parts are brand new Article IV’s about relation Between the states and nation V covers new amendments And their ratification VI is saying federal law will always be Supreme VII says to make this real nine states will have to agree Checks and balances ensure no branch is growing too strong The Court declares unconstitutional what it thinks is wrong If the law ain’t good, the President can veto Congress can override, impeach his seat too Federalists papers, 85 to make ya Want this Constitution, Publius’s a faker It’s really Hamilton, John Jay, and Madison Still there is one thing I can’t help feel is missing Oh yeah Constitution Will pass if we promise to have a Bill of Rights 10 Amendments, I could talk about them all night Wanna know them, click here, and you will be alright Constitution Delaware’s the first state to ratify New Hampshire is ninth, it’s now bonafide And the new plan takes effect nationwide (Huzzah, huzzah, huzzah, huzzah, huzzah) A living document, it’s meant to adapt to the times 27 Amendments so far One repealed ‘cause it went too far (Prohibition, prohibition, baby) Representative democracy, ensures the people Are the real source of power And this country remains ours Constitution We the people wanted a more perfect Union Founding Fathers came up with this great solution Plan of government that we are still using Constitution
Views: 280360 MrBettsClass
The Best United States Documents - Articles of Confederation; Constitution; Declaration; Gettysburg
 
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Best United States Documents - Articles of Confederation by the Second Continental Congress; U.S. Constitution; The Declaration of Independence; Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address The Articles of Confederation: On November 15th, 1777 The Articles of Confederation became the first constitution of the United States, though not yet ratified by the thirteen original colonies. Ratification of the Articles took place almost three and a half years later on March 1st, 1781. The purpose of the articles was to create a confederation of sovereign states with a weak central government; thus allowing state governments to wield most of the power. It wasn't long before the need for a stronger federal government was realized which led to the Articles being replaced by the United States Constitution. The Articles of Confederation is the common term for The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union. The U.S. Constitution: The United States Constitution is the legal backbone of the United States of America and comprises the basic laws of the United States Federal Government. Delegates from twelve of the thirteen original colonies put the Constitution's frame work together in May 1787 in Philadelphia. The Constitution defines the three branches of government and their jurisdictions; they are the Executive Branch (President/Vice President), Legislative Branch (Congress comprised of the Senate & House of Representatives), and the Judicial Branch (the Supreme Court). The need for three branches of government was to create a separation of powers so that not one person or group has full responsibilities, but that they're spread out and each branch must refer to the other by a means of checks and balances. The Declaration of Independence: The Declaration of Independence is a document that is the epitome of freedom and liberty. It was drafted by Thomas Jefferson in 1776 as a list of grievances against the King of England, George III. The Declaration expresses the conviction of Americans in a philosophy of self-evident truths of what individual liberty and freedom should be. The Declaration was the beginning to separation from England and the catalyst for a birth of a nation. The Gettysburg Address: The Gettysburg Address is considered one of the greatest and most quoted speeches of a President throughout American history. President Abraham Lincoln gave his address on the battlefield at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on November 19th, 1863. It was a few months after the battle at Gettysburg was over, the purpose of Lincoln being there was to consecrate a cemetery to the fallen Union soldiers of the Civil War. It is believed that Lincoln's main goal of this opportunity was to fight for the United States as a united country and to express the equality of all under the law. (Summaries by Aldark) - SUBSCRIBE to Greatest Audio Books: http://www.youtube.com/GreatestAudioBooks - LISTEN to this entire book for free! Chapter Listing and Length: Articles of Confederation by The Second Continental Congress -- 00:21:28 US Constitution by The United States -- 00:49:17 Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson -- 00:09:28 Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln -- 00:02:13 This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more info visit Librivox.org
Views: 2688 Greatest AudioBooks
♫ Articles of Confederation: "Article 11" - Sean and Dean Kiner - Extra History
 
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Listen to "Article 11," the theme song of our series on the Articles of Confederation! Music by Sean and Dean Kiner: http://bit.ly/23isQfx Support us on Patreon! http://bit.ly/EHPatreon What were the Articles of Confederation? Find out! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6rHSiN0vKk&index=1&list=PLhyKYa0YJ_5A9iLoiK_KYiCNVsCT11vZ9 (---More details below) Subscribe for new episodes every Saturday! http://bit.ly/SubToEC ___________ Play games with us on Extra Play! http://bit.ly/WatchEXP Talk to us on Twitter (@ExtraCreditz): http://bit.ly/ECTweet Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/ECFBPage Get our list of recommended games on Steam: http://bit.ly/ECCurator
Views: 99248 Extra Credits
Quickie: The Articles of Confederation
 
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Before the Constitution, there was the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, the document that first created the United States. _____ YᴏᴜTᴜʙᴇ: https://www.youtube.com/shanedk BɪᴛCʜᴜᴛᴇ: https://www.bitchute.com/shanedk/ Lɪᴠᴇsᴛʀᴇᴀᴍs: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCg3bMbE6gbL1GaADuZaC8jw Pᴀᴛʀᴇᴏɴ: https://www.patreon.com/shanedk MᴀᴋᴇʀSᴜᴘᴘᴏʀᴛ https://www.makersupport.com/shanedk Pᴏᴅᴄᴀsᴛ: http://podcast.bogosity.tv/ Dɪsᴄᴏʀᴅ: https://discord.bogosity.tv/ Mᴀsᴛᴏᴅᴏɴ: @[email protected] @[email protected] PᴀʏPᴀʟ: https://www.paypal.me/shanedk Bɪᴛᴄᴏɪɴ Cᴀsʜ: 1PyiWjnNK4TivWwzchprVYBwBxCbJrSK7M DASH: XmebStk9yUTzDCnwnxGkTCRzvm3HjRUXwi AʟᴛCᴏɪɴs: http://altcoins.bogosity.tv
Views: 993 Shane Killian
The Making of the American Constitution - Judy Walton
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/who-made-the-american-constitution-judy-walton How did a meeting intended to revise the Articles of Confederation lead to the new Constitution for the United States? Discover how a handful of men--sitting in sweltering heat and shrouded by secrecy--changed the course of history for America in 1787. Lesson by Judy Walton, animation by Ace & Son Moving Picture Co., LLC.
Views: 283160 TED-Ed
Articles of Confederation
 
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This video discusses the creation of the Articles of Confederation, its weaknesses, and the call to rethink the plan and create a new structure of government in the United States.
Views: 285 Pam Ogilvy
Articles of Confederation VS Constitution
 
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This is a video I made for a class project in which the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution are compared. Music is credited to Of Monsters and Men, Yellow Light Disclaimer: All rights of the music in this video are reserved to their rightful owner.
Views: 2310 Madison Nicole
LIMITED GOVERNMENT AND THE ARTICLES of CONFEDERATION.avi
 
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There is a time from 1781 to 1789 our government had also excised each year a new president ( for a total of 7 presidents prior to George Washington). This was also a growing time for our nation. This is very important time for all to understand our constitution. To understand what the constitution was to do. While also limit the size of government. You must understand these articles before you can understand the job the constitution was to do. You may disagree, but it is like one who does not understand division and trying to do algebra. The algebra strength is a strong understanding of all basic math functions. SO IS IT SO WITH OUR CONSTITUTION!!! TO UNDERSTAND OUR CONSTITUTION AND THE JOB IT MUST FOREFILL. YOU MUST UNDERSTAND THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION AND HOW IT HAD FAILED. When it became apparent that government under the Articles of Confederation was, in the words of George Washington, little more than the shadow without the substance, agitation for a stronger federal government began. This agitation resulted in the Annapolis Convention of 1786 and the Federal Constitutional Convention of 1787, which drafted the Constitution of the United States from 1786 through 1789 is the time it took to make and have the Constitution of United States of America to become the supreme law of this nation. Actually if you consider the birth of the government of 1781 to 1789 is the actual time it took for you constitution to be developed. ________________________________________ The Articles of Confederation Agreed to by Congress November 15, 1777; ratified and in force, March 1, 1781. Preamble To all to whom these Presents shall come, we the undersigned Delegates of the States affixed to our Names send greeting. Whereas the Delegates of the United States of America in Congress assembled did on the fifteenth day of November in the Year of our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy seven, and in the Second Year of the Independence of America, agree to certain articles of Confederation and perpetual Union between the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts-bay, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, in the words following, viz: Articles of Confederation and perpetual Union between the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts-bay, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia. ________________________________________ Article I. The Stile of this Confederacy shall be "The United States of America." ________________________________________ Article II. Each state retains its sovereignty, freedom, and independence, and every Power, Jurisdiction, and right, which is not by this confederation expressly delegated to the United States, in Congress assembled. ________________________________________ Article III. The said States hereby severally enter into a firm league of friendship with each other, for their common defense, the security of their liberties, and their mutual and general welfare, binding themselves to assist each other, against all force offered to, or attacks made upon them, or any of them, on account of religion, sovereignty, trade, or any other pretense whatever. ________________________________________ Article IV. The better to secure and perpetuate mutual friendship and intercourse among the people of the different States in this union, the free inhabitants of each of these States, paupers, vagabonds, and fugitives from justice excepted, shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of free citizens in the several States; and the people of each State shall have free ingress and regress to and from any other State, and shall enjoy therein all the privileges of trade and commerce, subject to the same duties, impositions, and restrictions as the inhabitants thereof respectively, provided that such restrictions shall not extend so far as to prevent the removal of property imported into any State, to any other State, of which the owner is an inhabitant; provided also that no imposition, duties or restriction shall be laid by any State, on the property of the united States, or either of them. If any person guilty of, or charged with, treason, felony, or other high misdemeanor in any State, shall flee from justice, and be found in any of the united States, he shall, upon demand of the Governor or executive power of the State from which he fled, be delivered up and removed to the State having jurisdiction of his offense. . YES I JD IS A PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE FOR 2012 AND ALSO CHECKOUT www.theconstitutionistparty.com Thank you for your time Jd
Views: 1435 Jd Criveau
20. Confederation
 
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The American Revolution (HIST 116) This lecture discusses the ongoing political experimentation involved in creating new constitutions for the new American states. Having declared independence from Great Britain, Americans had to determine what kind of government best suited their individual states as well as the nation at large; to many, this was the "whole object" of their revolutionary turmoil. Different people had different ideas about what kind of republican government would work best for their state. Should there be a unicameral or a bicameral legislature? How should political representation be organized and effected? How far should the principle of popular sovereignty be taken? 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Confederation 03:13 - Chapter 2. An Atmosphere of Experimentation with Governance 07:47 - Chapter 3. Congressional Encouragement of New State Constitutions 13:38 - Chapter 4. Adams's Thoughts on Government: Support for Bicameral Legislature 20:12 - Chapter 5. Core Tenets and Ideas in the State Constitutions 32:30 - Chapter 6. The Development of the Articles of Confederation 41:31 - Chapter 7. Conclusion Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2010.
Views: 26153 YaleCourses
Articles of Confederation | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Articles of Confederation Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Articles of Confederation, formally the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, was an agreement among the 13 original states of the United States of America that served as its first constitution. It was approved, after much debate (between July 1776 and November 1777), by the Second Continental Congress on November 15, 1777, and sent to the states for ratification. The Articles of Confederation came into force on March 1, 1781, after being ratified by all 13 states. A guiding principle of the Articles was to preserve the independence and sovereignty of the states. The central government established by the Articles received only those powers which the former colonies had recognized as belonging to king and parliament.The Articles formed a war-time confederation of states, with an extremely limited central government. While unratified, the document was used by the Congress to conduct business, direct the American Revolutionary War, conduct diplomacy with foreign nations, and deal with territorial issues and Native American relations. The adoption of the Articles made few perceptible changes in the federal government, because it did little more than legalize what the Continental Congress had been doing. That body was renamed the Congress of the Confederation; but Americans continued to call it the Continental Congress, since its organization remained the same.As the Confederation Congress attempted to govern the continually growing American states, delegates discovered that the limitations placed upon the central government rendered it ineffective at doing so. As the government's weaknesses became apparent, especially after Shays' Rebellion, individuals began asking for changes to the Articles. Their hope was to create a stronger national government. Initially, some states met to deal with their trade and economic problems. However, as more states became interested in meeting to change the Articles, a meeting was set in Philadelphia on May 25, 1787. This became the Constitutional Convention. It was quickly realized that changes would not work, and instead the entire Articles needed to be replaced. On March 4, 1789, the government under the Articles was replaced with the federal government under the Constitution. The new Constitution provided for a much stronger federal government by establishing a chief executive (the President), courts, and taxing powers.
Views: 14 wikipedia tts
The Articles of Confederation and Shays' Rebellion
 
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An introduction to the Articles of Confederation and its weaknesses. How Shays' Rebellion was one of the catalysts for the Constitutional Convention of 1787.
Views: 22488 Khan Academy
The US Constitution - Breaking Down the Articles
 
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PowerPoint available at: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Mr-Raymond-Civics-Eoc-Academy The video is a quick overview of the sections or Articles of the US Constitution. Students will learn about Article I and it's establishing the powers and structure of the US Legislative Branch known as Congress. Article II establishes and outlines the Executive Branch headed up by the President of the United States. Article III established the Judicial Branch headed by the US Supreme Court. Article IV discusses the relationship between the Federal Government and state governments known as federalism. Article V establishes how to create amendments to the Constitution. Article VI is known as the "Supremacy Clause" which establishes that federal law is more powerful than state law. Article VII outlines the way the US Constitution was ratified. Mr. Raymond’s Civics E.O.C. Academy was designed for students taking the Florida Civics End-of-Course (EOC) Exam. However, as many states are implementing Civics Exams, these videos will work for all students of Civics, US Government, and US History. Currently students have to pass a civics state exam in order to graduate in Idaho, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Arizona, North Dakota, Louisiana, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah. These videos look at all of the civics benchmarks that will be tested on most state civics exams. As a civics teacher I have often looked for civics YouTube video clips to show my students. I hope these videos will serve as a supplement to lessons for civics teachers, US history teachers, US government teachers and their students. While they might be a little basic for AP Government students, they could serve as a refresher of basic concepts and content. I have also thought that these videos could help those who are going to take the naturalization test to become US Citizens. I have also been reached by parents whose children are taking Florida Virtual School’s (FLVS) Civics class. ***For noncommercial, educational, and archival purposes under Law of Fair Use as provided in section 107 of the US copyright law. No copyrights infringements intended***
Article I of the Constitution | US Government and Politics | Khan Academy
 
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Article I of the US Constitution describes the roles and powers of Congress. In this video, Kim discusses Article I with scholars Heather Gerken and Ilya Somin. To learn more about US Government and Politics, visit Khan Academy at https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/ap-us-government-and-politics To read more of Article I, visit the National Constitution Center’s Interactive Constitution: https://constitutioncenter.org/interactive-constitution/articles/article-i On this site, leading scholars interact and explore the Constitution and its history. For each provision of the Constitution, experts from different political perspectives coauthor interpretive explanations when they agree and write separately when their opinions diverge.
Views: 15705 Khan Academy
Congress for Dummies -- Article 1 of the Constitution
 
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The second in the Constitution for Dummies series, in this lecture HipHughes takes you through Article I of the Constitution examining all ten sections outlining Legislative Powers. The Constitution Explained Series. 48 Videos, 6.5 Hours Long. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLi3U-nPPrbS5d-juhFwo3hTBso0gq2sUZ
Views: 189925 Hip Hughes
How NOT to Confuse the Declaration, Articles, and Constitution - @MrBettsClass
 
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Students confusing these three is the bane of a US History teacher's existence. Never confuse them again. Check out the full History Hacks video here: http://youtu.be/jtJ2UYn4PMA New videos every Tuesday! Like on FaceBook: http://facebook.com/MrBettsClass Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/MrBettsClass Instagram: http://instagram.com/MrBettsClass "En la Brisa" Music by Dan-O at http://DanoSongs.com
Views: 19971 MrBettsClass
Let's Talk Articles of Confederation
 
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My US History class wanted me to do a video on this. This is all I've got.
Views: 411 Andrew Haas
Apush: Articles of Confederation
 
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The Articles of Confederation and The Constitution. We do not own the rights to these songs. No copyright infringement is intended.
Views: 366 NicolaIsis
The 8 U.S. Presidents Before George Washington
 
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WHO WERE THE FIRST PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES? When we think of the President of the United States, many people do not realize that we are actually referring to presidents elected under the U.S. Constitution. Everybody knows that the first president in that sense was George Washington. But in fact the Articles of Confederation, the predecessor to the Constitution, also called for a president - albeit one with greatly diminished powers. Eight men were appointed to serve one year terms as president under the Articles of Confederation. In November 1781, "John Hanson" became the first President of the United States in Congress Assembled, under the Articles of Confederation. Don't go checking the encyclopedia for this guy's name — he is one of those great men that are lost to history. If you're extremely lucky, you may actually find a brief mention of his name. (It's in the Encyclopedia Britannica.) The new country was actually formed on March 1, 1781 with the adoption of The Articles of Confederation. This document was actually proposed on June 11, 1776, but not agreed upon by Congress until November 15, 1777. Under the Articles of Confederation, the United States had no executive branch. The President of Congress was a ceremonial position within the Confederation Congress. Although the office required Hanson to deal with correspondence and sign official documents, it wasn't the sort of work that any President of the United States under the Constitution would have done. Hanson didn't really enjoy his job either, and found the work tedious and wished to resign. Unfortunately, the Articles of Confederation hadn't accounted for how succession worked and his departure would have left Congress without a President. So, because he loved his country, and out of a sense of duty, he remained in office. While there, he served from November 5, 1781 until November 3, 1782, he was able to remove all foreign troops from American lands, as well as their flags. He also introduced the Treasury Department, the first Secretary of War, and the first Foreign Affairs Department. He led the flight to guarantee the statehood of the Western Territories beyond the Appalachian Mountains that had been controlled by some of the original thirteen colonies. What's probably most interesting is that Hanson is also responsible for establishing Thanksgiving Day as the fourth Thursday in November. It was no easy task to be the first person in this position as President of Congress. So it's incredible that Hanson was able to accomplish as much as he did. Plus, instead of the four year term that current Presidents serve, Presidents under the Articles of Confederation served only one year. So, accomplishing anything during this short time was a great feat. Hanson played an important role in the development of United States Constitutional History, one often not stated, but true nonetheless. Often, Hanson is regarded as the "forgotten first President." In Seymour Weyss Smith's biography of him, John Hanson, Our First President, he says that the American Revolution had two primary leaders: George Washington in the military sphere, and John Hanson in politics. Although one position was ceremonial, and the other was more official, there are statues of both men in the United States Capitol in Washington D.C. John Hanson, from Maryland, died on November 15, 1783 at the age of 62. Sources: constitutionfacts.com constitution.org usconstitution.net jjmccullough.com TRC Host: Otis Cue Pate Music: These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution [version number] License. 1) Kellee Maize = Today freemusicarchive.org/music/Kellee_Maize/The_5th_Element/08_Today Today by Kellee Maize is licensed under a Attribution License. Disclaimer: Artist maintains all music rights, and does not have anything to do with the subject matter and productions of Topkats Rebel Connection. 2) The Copycuts = Lovers Like Neon http://freemusicarchive.org/music/The... Disclaimer: Artist maintains all music rights, and does not have anything to do with the subject matter and productions of Topkats Rebel Connection. Lovers Like Neon by The Copycuts is licensed under a Attribution-ShareAlike License. Topkats' Spreaker Channel: spreaker.com/topkatsairborn
Views: 36249 Topkats Pride
Articles of Confederation (gone bad)
 
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a play for history we had to do..... ps. it gets funnier as it gets on...and i play the soldier MUSIC: Riot~ Three Days Grace p.s.s this video sucks ass
Views: 643 Olivia Johnson